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Hot new Fantasy on Film

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  • Hot new Fantasy on Film

    Legend of Earthsea :?:

    http://www.scifi.com/earthsea/
    \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
    Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

  • #2
    *sigh*...I so wish it was good news but alas no :

    http://www.trollslayer.net/bb/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=864

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    • #3
      8O Good grief, what have they done to Ged?? I'm backing you up here Athenys... and the production, well it just looks. . . cheap. Sorry! Those books are very close to my heart. I was excited when I heard they were making it, but looks like I'll avoid it now!

      And please tell me it that isn't the bird from Superman playing Tenar? :x

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      • #4
        As I said before you can not expect tv networks to be able to make an epic movie. Now the special effects do look better than most tv made movies. Anyways, I tried to read the Earthsea books but they did not do anything for me. They did not make me feel anything What to you guys like about these books? I would like to know how they make you feel.

        Galadriel

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        • #5
          I got the Wizard of Earthsea its a great book! I just re-read it recently as well. Its really sad when Ged's little otak dude dies. I want to read the other books in the series

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          • #6
            Hmmm... I think what I like is that Ursula Le Guin writes about characters.

            Very vague indeed, but it's really hard to pinpoint what I like about her so much - apart from her use of dragons - I absolutely love her shapeshifters.

            Without giving too much away to those who haven't read the books, I really like how she treats her main character Ged. Oh balls to it - she takes away his magic and the guy is the most powerful wizard in the world!!! - it's a really interesting scenario, you really feel for him. There's one scene in 'Tehanu' so beautifully understated, but that makes me shed a tear every time. Makes a change from the usual wizard losing his powers then suddenly regaining them again/coming back to life, which seems pretty frequent in your run-of-the-mill sword 'n' sorcery rabble. Ged is human and has to deal with his losses. I first read some of the books when I was ten, and I read 'em all last year (I'm now 29) Bloody marvellous :D

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            • #7
              Oh my god!!!! What have they done?!?! The Earthsea quartet is one of my favourite set of books I've ever read. Ursula le Guin created soem amazing characters and a great story. And now to see it destroyed like this...

              Checking out the website it just seems all wrong. Looks like they're quite happy to ignore the actual books and story line and invent something of their own based own le Guins books.

              Ged is an old man for the 2nd, 3rd and last book! And how can he have a female classmate on Roke? All wizards were male! Also, Ged isn't white....

              Arg!!!!
              Regret achieves nothing. Regret breeds weakness. Regret is a cancer which attacks the body's vital organs and eventually destroys.

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              • #8
                Hmmm... I think what I like is that Ursula Le Guin writes about characters.

                Very vague indeed, but it's really hard to pinpoint what I like about her so much - apart from her use of dragons - I absolutely love her shapeshifters.
                I like characters too. I read "The Finding" from the Earthsea series. In my opinion I did not get to realy know any of they characters well. I would like to have seen human emotions and see what kind of people they were. Anyways, I pictured the world of Earthsea as based on Asian mythology. Then again I also pictured Ireland or Scotland.

                Galadriel

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                • #9
                  Oh balls to it - she takes away his magic and the guy is the most powerful wizard in the world!
                  I think Elric would have been quite happy if someone had taken all his magic + Stormbringer away as well, but because he was an EC he still had to do the whole Ragnarok maneuver. So much for retirement... But In Ged's case it helped to see that his character and not necessarily his powers made him who he was. Magic is clearly not the answer to all of life's problems, much as technology is in some aspects, and there is always a price to pay for abusing either. Not to mention it provided an opportunity to show more of Tenar's inner strength.

                  I'm backing you up here Athenys... and the production, well it just looks. . . cheap.
                  The costumes look like they are castoffs from the LOTR movies, the priestesses for example are supposed to dress in BLACK with horsehair belts and they are not 'nice' either. It's like saying Pan Tangians or Melniboneans are nice, one has to consider who Tenar initialy worships IMO. And the actors, Tenar isn't quite as terrible, but Ged who looks like a flippin' Hobbit is an even greater casting disaster...'we were color-blind when it came to casting'...yeah right, ok whatever :roll: . The worst part as I said before was that the screenwriter practically re-wrote the whole series! Here is what Ursula had to say about the whole fiasco:



                  "Earthsea"
                  11/13/2004

                  "Miss Le Guin was not involved in the development of the material or the making of the film, but we've been very, very honest to the books," explains director Rob Lieberman. "We've tried to capture all the levels of spiritualism, emotional content and metaphorical messages. Throughout the whole piece, I saw it as having a great duality of spirituality versus paganism and wizardry, male and female duality. The final moments of the film culminate in the union of all that and represent two different belief systems in this world, and that's what Ursula intended to make a statement about. The only thing that saves this Earthsea universe is the union of those two beliefs."

                  Sci Fi Magazine
                  December 2004

                  I've tried very hard to keep from saying anything at all about this production, being well aware that movies must differ in many ways from the books they're based on, and feeling that I really had no business talking about it, since I was not included in planning it and was given no part in discussions or decisions.

                  That makes it particularly galling of the director to put words in my mouth.

                  Mr Lieberman has every right to say what his intentions were in making the film he directed, called "Earthsea." He has no right at all to state what I intended in writing the Earthsea books.

                  Had "Miss Le Guin" been honestly asked to be involved in the planning of the film, she might have discussed with the film-makers what the books are about.

                  When I tried to suggest the unwisdom of making radical changes to characters, events, and relationships which have been familiar to hundreds of thousands of readers all over the world for over thirty years, I was sent a copy of the script and informed that production was already under way.

                  So, for the record: there is no statement in the books, nor did I ever intend to make a statement, about "the union of two belief systems." There's nothing at all about the "duality of spirituality and paganism," whatever that means, either.

                  Earlier in the article, Robert Halmi is quoted as saying that Earthsea "has people who believe and people who do not believe." I can only admire Mr Halmi's imagination, but I wish he'd left mine alone.

                  In the books, the wizardry of the Archipelago and the ritualism of the Kargs are opposed and united, like the yang and yin. The rejoining of the broken arm-ring is a symbol of the restoration of an unresting, active balance, offering a risky chance of peace.

                  This has absolutely nothing to do with "people who believe and people who do not believe." That terrible division into Believers and Unbelievers (itself a matter not of reason but of belief) is one which bedevils Christianity and Islam and drives their wars.

                  But the wizards of Earthsea would look on such wars as madness, and the dragons of Earthsea would laugh at them and fly away...

                  Toto, something tells me Earthsea isn't Iraq.

                  I wonder if the people who made the film of The Lord of the Rings had ended it with Frodo putting on the Ring and ruling happily ever after, and then claimed that that was what Tolkien "intended..." would people think they'd been "very, very honest to the books"?

                  Ursula K. Le Guin
                  13 November 2004

                  The whole thing pisses me off ...

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                  • #10
                    Well, at least we know le Guin isn't happy about it. Now we can all happily boycott it knowing that it's going to be crap.
                    Regret achieves nothing. Regret breeds weakness. Regret is a cancer which attacks the body's vital organs and eventually destroys.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      http://www.comingsoon.net/news/topnews.php?id=7554

                      There's an interview with Shawn Ashmore (who plays Ged) if anyone's interested.

                      Apparently he's also the guy who plays Iceman in the X-Men movies.

                      Saw a trailer for this the other day - didn't look too hot, CGI looked a little ropey.

                      I've not read the books, so can't comment on the adaptation. But at least Le Guin is bound to get a few more book sales out of it - there's bound to be a bit of new interest for her. (I mean there were people who liked the D&D movie, it can't be half as bad as that).
                      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

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                      • #12
                        So what about the book made the sci-fi channel movie adaption an utter piece of crapola?

                        just the inaccuracies?

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                        • #13
                          Le Guin's sales have always been very good, especially for the Earthsea books. I wonder sometimes if a bad movie doesn't actually harm sales,
                          but I hope you're right. Didn't do a thing for The Final Programme, as I recall. Maybe some people found the film so baffling they bought the book, but then they found the book equally baffling. I remember one of the actors deciding he ought to read it and saying he was no better off.
                          He then asked me what the film was all about. No idea, I replied, since I didn't by that time. There you are, he said, turning to the other actors, even the author doesn't know what it's about...

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                          • #14
                            :lol:

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                            • #15
                              I like the Earthsea books well-enough, but it was a little jarring when
                              A Wizard of Earthsea first came out back in the late Sixties.
                              This was the author of The Left Hand of Darkness, after all,
                              which was a rather adult (mostly) piece of fiction -- not so much in
                              the sexuality, but in the central concerns of the work. Similar things
                              could be said for her other, earlier books (even for Rocannon's World).
                              Suddenly, with the first Earthsea book, we got a simpler, less
                              challenging story that was good for adults, but seemed really aimed
                              at slightly younger readers. It's an elegantly told Faustian myth, but
                              it's just not as bold a piece of work as a lot of her other books of the
                              time.

                              Still, I'm sorry to learn about the Hollywood trashing of her books.
                              This happens when people sell options on their work. They need
                              to be careful with whom they choose to do business. Mr. Moorcock
                              could likely comment on this. We know Harlan Ellison could. :lol:

                              (Don't we know it.)

                              LSN

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