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Hero movie

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  • Hero movie

    This simply has to be one of the most visually stunning movies I have ever seen. Absolutely beautiful in every sense of the word. The soundtrack alone almost brought a tear to my eyes. And the fights... oh the fights! It's like watching dancers rather than the overblown nonsense that cinema is currently obsessed with.

    Anyone else seen it? If not, I couldn't recommend it highly enough!
    Call me cockey, but if there\'s an alien I can\'t kill, I haven\'t met him and killed him yet!

  • #2
    I was lead to believe it contained the BS 'flying fights' seen in Crouching Tiger, is this true?
    "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
    --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PsychicWarVeteran
      I was lead to believe it contained the BS 'flying fights' seen in Crouching Tiger, is this true?
      Bob, PWV, what is the name of the movie and who made it? Who did the choreography?

      After Bob's encomium on this subject (dare I say "paean"?) I want at least to look it up
      and inform myself a little as to its particulars.

      Bob: You should take PWV's comments anent the "flying fights" stuff with a grain of
      artificial salt substitute. He and I have an extracurricular interest that makes us a little
      harder to please in these matters than is the case for most people.

      PWV: I told you we should never have stolen and read the secret Wu Dang Mountain
      manual! Knowledge is the enemy, sometimes, of simple pleasures. ;)

      LSN

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      • #4
        Yes, it does contain a 'flying fight'. It takes place on water, too, which looks all the more silly.

        The film really is glorious. Please don't let that put you off :)

        It all boils down to the whole being more than the sum of its parts. The wonderful soundtrack, fantastical colours and amazing choreography combine to make something majestic and beautiful.
        Call me cockey, but if there\'s an alien I can\'t kill, I haven\'t met him and killed him yet!

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        • #5
          I saw Hero at the weekend, and loved it. It is visually and aurally stunning. The whole movie seems more like a moving painting than a film. The fight scenes are like dance sequences, and are superb. The best film I have seen so far this year. :D

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          • #6
            PWV: I recall your praise of Spider-Man 2 a while back. Hero looks no more silly than that, so you should be fine with it, I think.
            Call me cockey, but if there\'s an alien I can\'t kill, I haven\'t met him and killed him yet!

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            • #7
              You guys dropped enough information to permit me to look it up. The movie appears
              to be somewhat reminiscent of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, in that it's a sort
              of "serious" film that uses the tropes and some of the machinery of Hong Kong kung fu
              revenge movies. This kind of thing is a little hard for Western audiences, not raised
              on such films, to swallow. (My wife's reaction to the flying scenes in Crouching Tiger...,
              for instance, was hilarity.)

              Several major reviewers gave it very high marks and write of it in terms not very
              different from those of Bob and Cypher. One reviewer went so far as to compare
              it to Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon, in the way it presents a basic story, then
              peels off layer after layer of what we think is "reality."

              So it sounds as if it's got some things going for it.

              That being said, my reaction to the Hong Kong-style use of wires for flying scenes is
              not terribly far from that of PWV. I find I need to ignore it in Crouching Tiger...
              to appreciate what the film does well. Perhaps that's true here, too.

              LSN

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              • #8
                It doesn't occur half as much in Hero. In Crouching Tiger, they literally flew away from eachother. It seems to be used more subtly in hero; like when the characters jump, or are knocked away, they seem to land with grace.

                The water scene really is the only major case of the wires.

                Enjoy it, if you get to see it.
                Call me cockey, but if there\'s an alien I can\'t kill, I haven\'t met him and killed him yet!

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                • #9
                  Of course, we Brits were raised on shows like Thunderbirds and Captain Scarlet, so we're used to seeing our heroes pulled around on wires... they were puppets of course, so it's a little different, but I'm sure there's a connection in the psyche somewhere.

                  Hero got a terrible review in the Mail on Sunday, so it must be good.
                  "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
                    Hero got a terrible review in the Mail on Sunday, so it must be good.
                    And an excellent review in the Morning Star no less....
                    http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/c...entous_history :)
                    \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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                    • #11
                      So are you going to see "Team America?"
                      :D

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                      • #12
                        Bob: I will indeed see it. It's not that I can't abide the wire scenes, it's just that Crouching Tiger continually made it difficult to suspend my disbelief. Limited use won't bother me.

                        Besides, since it's a Tarantino movie, I'm sort of obligated to see it. Quentin is da man.

                        LSN: Yes, knowledge definitely can ruin simple pleasures. I feel this in so many areas of my life. But, of course, once you know something, you can't un-know it.

                        Thing that bothers me the most about using too many wires in these kung fu movies is that martial artists -- and specifically Chinese martial artists -- can do so many amazing things that it's sort of sad that such tactics need to be implemented. Look at the remarkable things Jackie Chan does. I've seen Chinese entertainment troupes do things that seemed impossible.
                        "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                        --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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                        • #13
                          Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was superior to Hero. I wasn't put off by the wires, because I saw it as a deft bit of coreography that just isn't possible on the floor. CTHD's strength was in the politics of women, the strong women, and the use of weaponry. I remember the tavern fight with great relish.

                          Hero's non-linearity offers false predictibility, and by the third iteration I was starting to wonder what would happen next. The message is simplistic. What was goofy to me were the scenes containing the arrows, which is at least as cheesy as strings and definitely less interesting. The usage of color had a strong impact on me and the martial artwork was very stimulating, particularly the "imagined melee". I also enjoyed the clever building of the "symbol" throughout the storytelling. I thought it was one thing, and then another, and then it's final true meaning. The ending was sentimental and a somewhat poor way to tie it all up. I was hoping that it was a false ending.

                          One guy fell asleep in front of me, and people laughed at all the artful moments. I found myself laughing, alone, when the old man packed up his instrument.
                          The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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                          • #14
                            PWV: Tarantino only picked up the title; he had nothing to do with the creation of the film. It suprised me to learn it had already been out for near two years in the East! Definite kudos to Tarantino for helping bring it over to a wider audience, though!

                            Berry: Though I take your points about Crouching Tiger on board, Hero has the edge for me. It was so beautifully crafted, that it left more of a mark on me than Crouching Tiger. Indeed, about the only thing that could have made Hero better, for me, would have been the inclusion of Michelle Yeoh. Her skill in Crouching Tiger, was breathtaking.
                            Call me cockey, but if there\'s an alien I can\'t kill, I haven\'t met him and killed him yet!

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                            • #15
                              I thoroughly enjoyed Ying Xiong (aka Hero). Everything from the soundtrack to the cinematography was superb. I marginally prefer this over Crouching Tiger... as I am already well-versed in Hong Kong movies and find I prefer the more direct approach coupled with the astonishing eye candy (and it is astonishing!)

                              There's a more in-depth look at the movie on my blog of Saturday, September 25th, 2004 @ www.gaiateam.dsl.pipex.com

                              I must just say that I didn't think the ending overly sentimental and perhaps it would more aptly be described as classically tragic. It does have several "on wires" fight scenes but, as Bob mentions, if you have no issues with a man dressed in red & blue pyjamas swinging thru New York on webbing, fantasy martial arts should present no problems :)

                              -mr.wolfie
                              www.gaiateam.dsl.pipex.com

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