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Favourite SF authors

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  • #61
    Lest I forget:

    Stanislaw Lem: Solaris, His Master's Voice, The Cyberiad, Tales of Pirx the Pilot, The Futurological Congress, A Perfect Vacuum, Imaginary Magnitude, The Chain of Chance, Fiasco ...

    The Strugatsky Brothers: Definitely Maybe, Far Rainbow, Beetle in the Anthill, The Second Invasion from Mars, The Final Circle of Paradise, The Snail on the Slope, Noon: 22nd Century ...

    In my humble opinion, if you haven't read either Lem and/or the Strugatsky Brothers, you're missing out on some of the very best SF on the planet, and you've only got yourself to blame.

    (If McCaffrey is an SF writer, then I would say that Andrei Platonov: Chevengur, The Foundation Pit, The Fierce and Beautiful World, is probably one as well.)
    sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

    Gold is the power of a man with a man
    And incense the power of man with God
    But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
    And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

    Nativity,
    by Peter Cape

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    • #62
      Re-Barker ILP.
      Couldnt agree more on Weaveworld and Pie-o-pah but i love the three Abarat books and cant wait for the next two.
      Sacrament though is by far my favourite.
      "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

      Hunter S Thompson

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      • #63
        Originally posted by thingfish View Post
        Re-Barker ILP.
        Couldnt agree more on Weaveworld and Pie-o-pah but i love the three Abarat books and cant wait for the next two.
        Sacrament though is by far my favourite.
        I haven't read Sacrament yet - I've read some of his American books, and they're not the same sort of book. Abarat is a "domestic" sort of book, what you'd never expect him to write, if all you've ever read are the likes of Weaveworld and The Hellbound Heart. (Happy happy, joy joy, I've picked up his Theatre Games! (oops, corrigendum: The Clive Barker of this book was born in Yorkshire in 1931; Clive Barker of Hellraiser fame was born in Liverpool in 1952. My bad.)) But then, as he says, he's writing it for his partner's daughter - I suppose you could say he's adopted her and it would seem she's adopted him -, and that comes through. It's even playful, and he manages to pull it off, but it's a totally different sort of book to Weaveworld, and Imajica.
        Last edited by In_Loos_Ptokai; 10-28-2008, 02:02 AM.
        sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

        Gold is the power of a man with a man
        And incense the power of man with God
        But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
        And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

        Nativity,
        by Peter Cape

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        • #64
          I never knew anything much about his domestic situation ILP but on reflection to what you said i can see what you mean.
          They do have that element to them.
          Have you read The Thief of Always?
          Its a barkerlike dark take on the childrens fairytale genre and is great.
          BTW if you see Sacrament anywhere i would highly recommend you pick it up.
          "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

          Hunter S Thompson

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          • #65
            Originally posted by In_Loos_Ptokai View Post
            Lest I forget:

            Stanislaw Lem: Solaris, His Master's Voice, The Cyberiad, Tales of Pirx the Pilot, The Futurological Congress, A Perfect Vacuum, Imaginary Magnitude, The Chain of Chance, Fiasco ...
            I've only read Solaris, The Futurological Congress, and Chain of Chance, but I agree with you on the first two. Chain of Chance wasn't anything special by comparison, but his masterworks probably pushed up my expectations. Lem wrote very timeless books that read as well today as when they were written.
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            • #66
              Not much activity here, but I thought I'd reply anyway, since I'm new. i saw a lot of my favorites mentioned here- Dick, Bester, Strugatskys, Disch, etc, but noticed a couple I like a lot that weren't mentioned.

              One of my all time favorite series is the Marid Audran Budayeen series by George Alec Effinger. The Budayeen is based on New Orleans, where he lived. The books- When Gravity Fails, A Fire in The Sun and The Exile Kiss are amazingly good. If you're into cyberpunk and haven't read them, you've missed something really special. Unfortunately, he died before he finished the 4th novel. He was ill a lot of his life and ended up at the wrong hospital once and they charged him a lot and sued him. The suit attached his own work, so he had to write in other people's worlds just to survive.

              Another favorite author is Samuel R. Delany. Dhalgren remains my all time favorite book for many reasons. The Neveryon series is great too- intelligent Sword & Sorcery. He hasn't written much SF in a long time, but his next novel, I've heard, will mark his return to the genre.

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              • #67
                The Effinger books sound interesting NR.
                Im off to have a wee look for them.
                Cheers for that!
                "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                Hunter S Thompson

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                • #68
                  Mike
                  Asimov
                  Frank Herbert
                  Gene Wolf
                  Jack Vance
                  some Heinlein but most of his stuff I don't like
                  Last edited by flutegirlrockz; 02-08-2012, 02:37 AM.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by The English Assassin View Post
                    Ther are so many:
                    • Kim Stanley Robinson
                    • Ursula Le Guin
                    • Dan Simmons
                    • Brian Aldiss
                    • H.G. Wells
                    • Ray Bradbury: only part way through the Martian Cronicles but I'm loving it


                    At one point I would also have put Iain Banks in there but he increasingly irritates me these days
                    Always interesting to necro-vamp your old posts... These days I'm much less into SF than I was. Of those author's listed I can only imagine reading Aldiss and HG Wells now. Bradbury, yes - but not really his SF...

                    The only other proper SF author I can imagine reading these days is Philip K Dick. As much as I love Vonnegut I think I've read all I need to read of him. Much of his later work reeked of self-parody to the extent that he seemed to loss the ability to write a novel by the time he wrote Time Quake.

                    The only SF stuff, apart from PKD, I can really see me dipping into is pre-genre science fantasies of Verne, Shiel, Wells... and maybe the late comer to this proto-genre category Wyndham, who I have an ambivalent relationship with, yet whose work strangely fascinates me. However I think all these have as much in common with fantasy or horror as they do with the techno-utopianism of modern SF. I think genre fiction only gets interesting when it starts bleeding into other genres and/or into non-genre territory. I suppose this is "weird" fiction, although I don't love the term.
                    forum

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                    • #70
                      Good thread, due for a bit of benign necromancy.

                      Favorite authors, in no particular order...

                      Robert E. Howard
                      Fritz Leiber
                      Michael Moorcock (of course)
                      Karl Edward Wagner
                      Leigh Brackett (picked up her stuff after reading a mention in an intro MM wrote)
                      CL Moore (see above!)
                      Barrington Bayley
                      Talbot Mundy
                      H Rider Haggard
                      ER Burroughs
                      HP Lovecraft
                      Clark Ashton Smith
                      Joe Lansdale
                      Howard Waldrop
                      Neal Barrett Jr.
                      Stanislaw Lem
                      Gustav Meyrink

                      Some non spec-fic...
                      Dashiell Hammett
                      Raymond Chandler
                      Cornell Woolrich
                      Elmer Kelton
                      Charles Willeford
                      Chester Himes
                      Dave Hardy
                      http://fireandsword.blogspot.com/

                      My books: Crazy Greta, Tales of Phalerus the Achaean, and Palmetto Empire.

                      sigpic

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                      • #71
                        I think I can now add Bob Shaw and Alastair Reynolds to the list of my favourite SF authors. Read a few of Shaw's now and enjoy his characterisation very much, so I'll probably be picking up any of his I see. Reynolds has captured me with his massive ideas and the Tension* he builds as he unfolds his stories.

                        Did I mention Edmund Cooper/Richard Avery? I can't remember how many of his I've read, but his Expendables series is a massively politically and ecologically incorrect guilty pleasure of mine.


                        *yes it really does have a captital 't'!
                        You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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                        • #72
                          Arthur C Clarke and Philip K Dick. ACK gave me a sense of wonder about the physical universe and the nature of evolution, PKD gave me a sense of wonder about the nature of metaphysical 'reality,' identity and perception. Does Robert Anton Wilson count as a sci-fi author? He also changed how I view reality with some of his books, especially the 'Historical Illuminatus Chronicles.'

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                          • #73
                            There are so many that picking out just a few is pretty difficult:

                            Jerry Aherne (Survivalist series)
                            Patrick Tilley (Fade Out, Amtrak Wars)
                            Arthur C Clarke (Rama, Deep Range)
                            Isaac Asimov (Foundation, Robot)
                            Dean R Koontz (Lightning, Phantoms, Strangers)
                            HG Wells (Time Machine, Food of the Gods)
                            Philip Jose Farmer (Two Hawks from Earth)
                            Harry Harrison (Stainless Steel Rat, Deathworld)

                            There are far too many others to list, but I think these are the main ones over my last few years' of reading and re-reading.
                            Twitter: The system that put paid to the old adage 'politicians only lie when their lips start moving'

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                            • #74
                              Are you also too lazy to use the Search this Thread function?
                              _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                              _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                              _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                              _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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                              • #75
                                These days I am an avid science fiction TV shows and films watcher, but I am not really into typical science fiction books, although I did my reading of Arthur C Clarke, Poul Anderson, Fredrik Pohl, Orson Scott Card, I am more tempted by the styles of P. K Dick, Zelazny, Moorcock, Ursula Le Guin, Jack Vance, Frank Herbert and William Gibson.
                                "From time to time I demonstrate the inconceivable, or mock the innocent, or give truth to liars, or shred the poses of virtue.(...) Now I am silent; this is my mood." From Sundrun's Garden, Jack Vance.
                                "As the Greeks have created the Olympus based upon their own image and resemblance, we have created Gotham City and Metropolis and all these galaxies so similar to the corporate world, manipulative, ruthless and well paid, that conceived them." Braulio Tavares.

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