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Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

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  • #16
    I'm rather like the Gov - I was always into SF rather than fantasy. And in a big way: in my mid-teens I probably read little else. But then in the mid-70s I began to lose interest and gave up entirely by 1980, as my reading tastes became much wider (mind you having children might have had something to do with it ).

    The only SF I'm still interested in is Ballard and the New Wave stuff (New Worlds and asscociated authors, rather than the U.S.)

    But I kept some of my SF paperback collection, and its interesting to see how similar some of the names are to those already mentioned:

    Aldiss (Hothouse, Barefoot in the Head)

    Dick (A Scanner Darkly, Three Stimata, Man in the High Castle)

    Disch (Camp Concentration, Under Compulsion, 334)

    Cordwainer Smith

    Rob Shekley (esp. Dimension of Miracles)

    Bester

    Charles Harness

    Olaf Stapleton

    Clifford Simak (City)

    Blish (Case of Conscience, Black Easter, Day of Judgement)

    R A Lafferty (Fourth Mansions, Ninehundred Grandmothers)

    Zelazny (but ONLY before Damnation Alley, which was so disappointing that I never read him again - wasn't there a thread a while back where someone made a similar comment to this?)

    I also had a very good collection of Henry Kuttner's short stories.
    Mike H.
    www.holli.co.uk

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Doc
      I read the Atrocity Archives recently. I absolutely loved it--the tone, the story, and the wit. Is his other stuff like that? I've almost bought Singularity Sky twice...
      I would say so. Atrocity Archives is probably his best, though Accelerando is good (similar to Greg Egan). Singularity Sky and its sequel are readable - The beginning of Singularity Sky is memorable with telephones falling from the sky! His Merchant Princes sequence is reminiscent of Zelazny's Amber and H Beam Piper's Paratime - enjoyable stuff.
      Statistically 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy.

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      • #18
        (digs in his pocket, opens his wallet, says goodbye to more money...)

        Thanks Elwher! I appreciate the relevant comparisons.

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        • #19
          It's a long time since I read all the sci-fi in my teens and more is coming back to me.
          TV/Movie tie-ins were another big thing, too. Let me see, I must have read (when they came out) Star Wars, The Black Hole, Battlestar Galactica, Buck Rogers, Alien, The Thing, The Empire Strikes Back, Logans Run, Close Encounters... Probably more.

          Strangely enough this led me to read Alan Dean Foster. Mainly the 'Commonwealth' series of books (apart from more of his tie-ins and follow-ups.) I particularly enjoyed 'Midworld,' with a planet covered in a riot of life. Stopped reading him when his 'Spellsinger' series started to come out, apart from filling in a few gaps.
          You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

          -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

          Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

          :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


          "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

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          • #20
            Are we not forgetting Sturgeon .....

            Some damned good books ( english tittles ignored ) and some interesting !

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Governor of Rowe Island
              Shit! I forgot to mention the second biggest colection of an authors work I have is a straight fight between two Phils - José Farmer and K. Dick. Can't get enough of either. Both of them brilliant ideas men, but very different.
              .
              Maybe you are a philophile
              Anyway,me...
              Well,apart from Moorcock I don't get many books from a single writer.I am not a fan of series I guess.
              But here are some of the most common names in my room...

              Tolkien
              Herbert-Frank of course...
              Dick
              Leguin
              Asimov
              I also like Zelazny very much but I have only a 3 books so far...

              Of course I usually have to buy Greek translations.Damn...why don't all the writers write...in Greek???
              But I can find in my language some cool stuff,so it's ok.
              Last edited by Heiron; 02-15-2013, 01:14 PM.

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              • #22
                Robert Silverberg is one of the great ones ......

                for his mainstream opus and for his more philosophical ones

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                • #23
                  Kim Stanley Robinson - the Mars series in particular. Science, Ecology, Politics, Spirituality, Radical Economics... what more can you ask for!
                  Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
                  Bakunin

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                  • #24
                    Clive Barker. Love his stuff to bits. He could write about the colour of cereal and I'd still probably love it. His use of language is so gorgeous and his metaphysical fantasies are to die for. Great stuff.
                    The name that can be named is not the true name.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Kamelion
                      Clive Barker. Love his stuff to bits. He could write about the colour of cereal and I'd still probably love it. His use of language is so gorgeous and his metaphysical fantasies are to die for. Great stuff.
                      I have a very high opinion of Barker's Weaveworld novel and reckon it one the best novels of the '80s, but once he moved the focus of his books away from England (Britain) to the USA I lost interest.
                      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by David Mosley
                        I have a very high opinion of Barker's Weaveworld novel and reckon it one the best novels of the '80s, but once he moved the focus of his books away from England (Britain) to the USA I lost interest.
                        Weaveworld was the first Barker story that I read and I have a real softspot for that one. I am a big fan of the Books of the Art, though - but I do understand what you mean about their focus on Americana. Imajica remains my favourite, I think (although I have yet to read his last few - Gallilee, Coldheart Canyon and the Abarat books - stuff by this Moorcock fellow keeps getting in the way ).

                        Did you read Sacrament at all? It seemed split between America and Britain in a number of curious ways. It strikes me as a very personal work, moreso than his other material - that split between countries seems echoed in Barker's own move from England to America, a shift in focus that sometimes reminds me of some of Mike's work.
                        The name that can be named is not the true name.

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                        • #27
                          No. In the late '80s I decided I wanted to expand my reading from the usual SF & Fantasy I was reading up to then and decided to sample the Horror genre, but I wasn't interested in reading the usual Stephen King/James Herbert/Shaun Huston stuff. Even then Barker had a cachet about him that made him more interesting to me. (I think Hellraiser had been released by then.) I bought WW, then Cabal, vols 1-3 of the Books of Blood (which mostly went unread in the end) & The Hellbound Heart. I then bought The Great and Secret Show, of which I read the first few chapters but didn't finish, and Imagica & his book for children (I forget the name). Both sat on my shelves and eventaully I ended up auctioning all of them bar WW, Cabal & THH. Oh, and the kids' book would wouldn't sell.
                          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by David Mosley
                            ...his book for children (I forget the name)...
                            Thief of Always, I think it was. I seem to recall reading somewhere that they were going to make it into an animated movie or something. I'd rather see the much-delayed Weaveworld miniseries.

                            Shaun Huston - hmm. I managed one of his books (something about Dagda destroying the world? Can't really recall). He quoted Queensryche lyrics on the opening page, which lured me in. Not a mistake I ever repeated. I am partial to Stephen King, though, more for the fantastic elements in his work than for the horror. And I love the way he portrays regular folks - there is a natural ease with which he shows mundane life that gives his stories a solidly real feel. Probably works well to highlight the supernatural elements when they crop up, but I could almost read them without the spooky stuff and just enjoy his descriptions of small town life, lol.
                            The name that can be named is not the true name.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by David Mosley
                              I have a very high opinion of Barker's Weaveworld novel and reckon it one the best novels of the '80s, but once he moved the focus of his books away from England (Britain) to the USA I lost interest.
                              I'm quoting David and agreeing with Kamelion, here.

                              I love Weaveworld and Imajica. The imagry in both is breathtaking. To me, the books of the Art are better because Barker (or perhaps, I,) was ready to deal with their complexity, having written (or in my case, read) Weaveworld and Imajca.

                              While I like The Great and Secret Show and Everville a great deal, I started losing a little interest with Sacrament and Galilee. I read Sacrament on a plane, and it seemed more of a book to pass time on a plane. The gothic aspect that I enjoyed in the books grounded in England was sorely missed. I think that some of Barker's themes needs a sense of age and time that you cannot create from America. (This coming from an American, of course. As a further aside, those who have read Gaiman's American Gods will understand the point I make) Perhaps that is why I still have not read Galilee--subtituting southern American gothic for the English cultural landscape seems to be too large a leap for me.

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                              • #30
                                Ther are so many:
                                • Kim Stanley Robinson
                                • Ursula Le Guin
                                • Dan Simmons
                                • Brian Aldiss
                                • H.G. Wells
                                • Ray Bradbury: only part way through the Martian Cronicles but I'm loving it


                                At one point I would also have put Iain Banks in there but he increasingly irritates me these days
                                forum

                                1. a meeting or assembly for the open discussion of subjects of public interest
                                2. a medium for open discussion, such as a magazine
                                3. a public meeting place for open discussion

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