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Favourite SF authors

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  • Favourite SF authors

    Surely someone else must read Science Fiction?

    I feel a bit of an odd one out on this site because I actually prefer to read SF (when I read any fiction that is.)

    I have been reading it for many years now, probably since before my teens. I remember scouring the shelves of my local mobile library for any new additions, on a Monday after school, before making my way to my Grandmothers for tea. Heinlein was my big favourite (I didn't know or understand about his political views back then) but I thought his later works were trying too hard to be 'cool' .
    I read many more authors over the years - Harrison, Asimov, Clarke, Weintraub, Pohl (& Kornbluth), Niven (& Pornelle), Varley, Blish, Aldiss, Bradbury, Haldeman, etc, etc, etc. I don't read a lot of modern authors but I do enjoy William Gibson, Steven Baxter, David Brin.

    I have just started reading 'Time' by Baxter, the first of his Manifold books.

    Come on who have you enjoyed reading? Do you like space operas? Or earthbased stories? End of the world stories? Utopias/Dystopias?

    I personally liked Post-Apocalypse stories, I must have read dozens. 'A Candle For Leibowitz' is on my re-read list (just as soon as I get it. )
    You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

    -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

    Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

    :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


    "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

  • #2
    Ooh, I haven't read any non-Moorcockian SF for years - but then I seem to have difficulty reading much Moorcock at the moment. However, on my shelves are books by:

    Philip K Dick - nearly 40 novels (most books by single author after Mike)

    J.G. Ballard - about six books including The Drowned World, The Wind from Nowhere, High Rise and The Atrocity Exhibition.

    Brian Aldiss - about three books (Report on Probability A, Barefoot in the Head, and Frankenstein Unbound)

    Thomas M. Disch - maybe half a dozen: Camp Concentration, Echo Round His Bones, 334, The Prisoner and some others(?)

    M. John Harrision - everything up to The Course of the Heart

    Norman Spinrad - Bug Jack Barron, The Iron Dream, The Men in the Jungle

    John Wyndham - everything from Triffids and up to Web plus Jizzle

    William Burroughs - The Naked Lunch and The Soft Machine

    Alfred Bester - The Demolished Man and Tiger, Tiger

    Philip E High - The Time Mercenaries

    William Gibson - about seven books inc. Neuromance, Count Zero, Difference Engine & Virtual Light

    Also loads of Doctor Who novels - Target novelisations, Virgin New/Missing Adventures and BBC EDAs & PDAs.

    Sadly, I can't say I've read all of those - many have been bought in second-hand shops and wait patiently to be read - sometimes for several years or even decades.

    Guess you could say that on the whole I prefer 'New Wave' SF.

    ETA: Ooh, nearly forgot - okay I did forget: Harry Harrison - first five Stainless Steel Rat novels.
    Last edited by David Mosley; 07-11-2006, 03:36 PM.
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

    Comment


    • #3
      I would add Vance, Silverberg, and many others ......

      Comment


      • #4
        Guv, Mr. Mosely, and Mr. Kane are very much on the nosey, add Verne, Williamson, Tucker, Budrys, Wells, Sterling, Jarry, and a few others just beyond my memory at the moment, oh, and I can read Brin all the way through sometimes.
        Last edited by Talisant; 07-11-2006, 05:38 PM.
        "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

        Comment


        • #5
          Frank Herbert rules!
          Free the West Memphis Three

          Comment


          • #6
            I forgot Bester! Fantastic writer.

            Forgot Herbert, too! Just love the Dune novels. I even used to own the Dune Encyclopedia (but see below. )

            Unfortunately, needing some space a few years ago, I sold most of my SF to the local second hand emporium. Now I find myself wanting to read them all again.

            I'm a big fan of Vonnegut, too. 'The Sirens of Titan' would have to be one of my favourite books.

            I absolutely adore 'The War of the Worlds' and 'The Time Machine' too, having come into possesion of a book containing those and 'The Island of Doctor Moreau' at an early age.

            Shit! I forgot to mention the second biggest colection of an authors work I have is a straight fight between two Phils - José Farmer and K. Dick. Can't get enough of either. Both of them brilliant ideas men, but very different.

            I used to be a big fan of anthologies. I found them an excellent way of trying different authors without having to spend time and/or money on a book that you might not enjoy.
            You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

            -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

            Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

            :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


            "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Talisant
              ...oh, and I can read Brin all the way through sometimes.
              I agree he can be a bit plodding but I'm enjoying the story he is unfolding in his 'Uplift' series. I thought 'The Postman' an enjoyable read. The film was shit though.
              You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

              -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

              Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

              :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


              "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm not Herbert fan but Heinlein, Pohl, Bradbury (list could go on) are among my top picks.
                Not sure if any of you beautiful people have read Mary Doria Russell but her The Sparrow and Children of God have stayed with me...poignant, thought provoking and humorous at times; linkies below to excerpts
                http://users.adelphia.net/~druss44121/thesparrow.htm
                http://users.adelphia.net/~druss44121/childrenofgod.htm

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sorry to butt in, but...

                  Originally posted by Governor of Rowe Island

                  I'm a big fan of Vonnegut, too. 'The Sirens of Titan' would have to be one of my favourite books.
                  I read Sirens of Titan and Dancers at the End of Time within a month of each other. The seemed to go together well.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Governor of Rowe Island
                    I agree he can be a bit plodding but I'm enjoying the story he is unfolding in his 'Uplift' series. I thought 'The Postman' an enjoyable read. The film was shit though.
                    I thought Kiln People was pretty good.
                    "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I always mean to read science-fiction, but end up going for the sword & sorcery/epic fantasy books. :o

                      I read most of the Berserker sequence by Fred Saberhagen. I guess those are mostly about machines fighting humans,haha,and not much is put into other issues.

                      The Rituals of Infinity and The Fireclown are the MM sci-fi that I read.


                      I might get on a roll soon though and put by nose in some good books.


                      I did also,recently, read Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?


                      do Robotech comics from the 80's count as sci-fi reading?

                      "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
                      - Michael Moorcock

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I forgot to mention ('cos they were hidden behind some Faber & Faber screenplays) Trevor Hoyle's "Q" series novels: Seeking the Mythical Future, Through the Eyes of Time, and The Gods Look Down.

                        I'm not sure how to describe them really. Christian Queghan is a Myth Technologist on Earth IVn, a planet based on Old Earth, which has since receded into myth and Legend. Queghan uses a machine that can project him into a infinite number of possible futures, but there's a risk each time he uses it that he won't be able to return. Through the Eyes of Time is probably the best book, in which Queghan travels to World War II, but not as history remembers it. Has anyone else read these books?
                        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I read science fiction rather rarely, as on the whole, I much prefer fantasy. Nonetheless, some of my favorite writers are known primarily for their science fiction. I may be the only one here to say so, but I've yet to read any of Mike's science fiction. His books are quite hard to find in my hometown. Even in Boston (where I go to school), his books are hard to come by, though that doesn't stop me from trawling the used bookstores.

                          I'm a big fan of Vonnegut, too. 'The Sirens of Titan' would have to be one of my favourite books.
                          Vonnegut's great. I've never considered him as science fiction author, but I like his books a lot. I need to read more of his stuff, as I've only read Slaughterhouse-Five, Cat's Cradle, and God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater thus far.

                          I personally liked Post-Apocalypse stories, I must have read dozens. 'A Candle For Leibowitz' is on my re-read list (just as soon as I get it. )
                          It's on my reread list too. I read that book in grade school, so I can be pretty sure I missed a lot. I'm planning to re-read when I go back to school this fall.

                          Not sure if any of you beautiful people have read Mary Doria Russell but her The Sparrow and Children of God have stayed with me...poignant, thought provoking and humorous at times
                          She's on my "to-read" list. I've heard that The Sparrow in particular is good. I don't know when I'll get around to reading her books, but I'm sure that I (eventually) will. Interestingly enough, Russell wrote the introduction to the new edition of A Canticle for Leibowitz.

                          One science fiction writer that I really like that has yet to be mentioned is Gene Wolfe. As yet, I've only read The Book of the New Sun and The Urth of the New Sun, though I plan to start his Wizard Knight books as soon as I finish what I'm reading now. I understand that Jack Vance fans tend to like Wolfe a lot, as Wolfe apparently draws a lot from Vance's Dying Earth books, though he is nonetheless an original author. To be honest, reading Wolfe has made me want to read Vance. Perhaps I'll have another writer for my favorites list soon...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I read quite a bit of SF - favourite authors are C J Cherryh, Stephen Baxter, Sir Arthur, Banksie. I like stuff from newer authors such as Charlie Stross, Alastair Reynolds and Richard Morgan too.

                            I have a soft spot for Bob Shaw (from meeting him at conventions, although I had read most of his stuff before I met him) and Eric Brown (lives in the village down the valley from us and is the treasurer of the allotment association my dad is a member of!)

                            Others I have enjoyed Greg Egan - he seems to have stopped producing altogether and Ian McDonald - Necroville is my favourite of his, although River of Gods came close.
                            Statistically 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Elwher
                              I read quite a bit of SF - favourite authors are C J Cherryh, Stephen Baxter, Sir Arthur, Banksie. I like stuff from newer authors such as Charlie Stross, Alastair Reynolds and Richard Morgan too.
                              I read the Atrocity Archives recently. I absolutely loved it--the tone, the story, and the wit. Is his other stuff like that? I've almost bought Singularity Sky twice...

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