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HP Lovecraft and His Work

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  • Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
    Now I'm horrified.
    Don't be scared. Just join us. Join us! JOIN US! MUAHAHAHA!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVuYFJ20Aew
    "If the environment were a bank, we would already have saved it." -Graffitti.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Octo Seven View Post
      ...
      You'll notice how Lovecraft heavily borrowed (well kinda stole) from it too, Skarl The Drummer is reminiscent of the demonic drummer and piper who lull Azathoth to sleep, Skarl also does it to keep Mana-Yood-Sushai sleeping lest he wake and destroy the universe.
      Kinda stole? But that makes him only kinda a great artist.

      I've also been mulling your insight of Lovecraft as youthful, housebound, shut-in (therefore a rather isolated person). It seems ironic how this isolated individual would see so much to fear in isolated communities. Then again, in some of his letters he does go on about needing the architecture, sights etc. of his home area in order to feel any sense of comfort.

      Originally posted by Jagged View Post
      Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
      Now I'm horrified.
      Don't be scared. Just join us. Join us! JOIN US! MUAHAHAHA!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVuYFJ20Aew
      I was expecting the dinner song of acceptance from Freaks.
      Last edited by Heresiologist; 05-28-2015, 03:03 PM.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Heresiologist View Post

        I was expecting the dinner song of acceptance from Freaks.
        one of us, one of us

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Heresiologist View Post
          Originally posted by Octo Seven View Post
          ...
          You'll notice how Lovecraft heavily borrowed (well kinda stole) from it too, Skarl The Drummer is reminiscent of the demonic drummer and piper who lull Azathoth to sleep, Skarl also does it to keep Mana-Yood-Sushai sleeping lest he wake and destroy the universe.
          Kinda stole? But that makes him only kinda a great artist.

          I've also been mulling your insight of Lovecraft as youthful, housebound, shut-in (therefore a rather isolated person). It seems ironic how this isolated individual would see so much to fear in isolated communities.

          Originally posted by Jagged View Post
          Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
          Now I'm horrified.
          Don't be scared. Just join us. Join us! JOIN US! MUAHAHAHA!

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVuYFJ20Aew
          I was expecting the dinner song of acceptance from Freaks.
          Although it wouldn't be ironic to an isolated person who had a fearful childhood. I think Dunwich Horror and Beyond The Wall of Sleep are great examples of his ideas on isolated communities asides from the obvious Innsmouth debacle. I wonder if the idea of those communities could be something akin to the mental landscape of a shut-in who is reminded too often of his noble but corrupted ancestry?

          Comment


          • Originally posted by krakenten View Post
            "I will show you fear in a handful of dust", now there's a frightening bit of biz! Elliot made play on the occult revival post WWI,
            I just read the first issue of Alsn Moore's Providence which directly mentions the above quote, Jack London, and The Respire Of Reputations. We're all on a similar track. If only someone could convince Alan to join in the conversation.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
              I'd say he was in the conversation. I'm looking forward to Providence.
              Issue One is in shops at the moment if you can't wait for the inevitable trade volume.I think you'll like what he's done with the material, definitely a fresh approach so far.

              Comment


              • As I understand it(based on my similar life)in Lovecraft's place and time, most people were not very mobile-they attended local schools, lived in the same neighborhood , worked in the local industries and had a restricted set of friends and associates.

                To be an outcast in such a place is to be utterly shunned, sometimes persecuted. Anyone who is not very strictly part of this narrow way is going to be called a 'queer', often by people who don't even understand what that is.

                From what I've seen of late, that way of life is perishing(and long past time) and exclusion is not as severe as once it was.

                What that does to you is leave a suspicion that something is going on that you cannot be part of.

                For me, growing up in York County, a very strange place indeed, full of odd religious sects and the Hexarie beliefs of the rural people, with the cruel ways of the mill hands and a flourishing underworld gave me an understanding of the world HPL knew.

                Just for an example, the elementary school I attended(the only one) had two enterences. One was the boys, the other, girls-this wasn't official, just custom. Walking past you heard a cacophony of "You Suck!" and "You Blow" 0r (........) eats it raw!" This from kids who had no idea of what that was.

                And as I said, there was an underworld.

                I understand HPL very well indeed. After my recent return to Red Lion, and my observation of the depopulation of the actual town, I think I understand it even better.

                Not what I expected.

                Comment


                • Before my mind wandered into complaining about my crummy childhood, I was about to comment on the fear of inclusion.

                  Just as the Borg will assimilate you, there are other fates to which one may be condemned involuntarily, and from which there is no escape.

                  This seems to be a metaphor for drug addiction(which is voluntary, anybody who doesn't know what's going to happen must have been living under a rock!)

                  I watched part of a SyFy channel movie where people in a small town were becoming hideous monsters, and once infected having a certain enthusiasm for it.

                  In my childhood, there was a widespread fear of inclusion of this sort, you might become a Communist, a homosexual(people saw them everywhere) almost by accident.

                  Perhaps Lovecraft's extreme racism and xenophobia came from a fear of being drawn into these outcast groups?

                  Not rational, of course,but frankly, my meditations on the XX Century have led me to the conclusion that said century was stark,raving mad.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Heresiologist View Post
                    Originally posted by Jagged View Post
                    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
                    Now I'm horrified.
                    Don't be scared. Just join us. Join us! JOIN US! MUAHAHAHA!

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVuYFJ20Aew
                    I was expecting the dinner song of acceptance from Freaks.
                    Drat, I didn't think of that. ...I mean, I THOUGHT of that, but found it beneath me. The Evil Dead, with the Necronomicon in it, get it? Get it? Much more relevant to an HPL thread, I should think. I wouldn't go off-topic and speak of irrelevant things like handicapped people being marginalized by clergymen, be it rabbis, vicars, or priests. What do you take me for?

                    By the way, have you heard the one about the rabbi, the vicar, and the priest who went into a bar?


                    [Frasier, exasperatedly to Niles: "Oh, stop saying 'be it'!"]
                    "If the environment were a bank, we would already have saved it." -Graffitti.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by opaloka View Post
                      ...
                      one of us, one of us
                      ...
                      Heh. Hailing from Lovecraft's favourite burg: New York. Maybe not The Horror from Red Hook so much as The Horror that is Punk Rock.

                      Originally posted by Jagged View Post
                      ...

                      Drat, I didn't think of that. ...I mean, I THOUGHT of that, but found it beneath me. The Evil Dead, with the Necronomicon in it, get it? Get it? Much more relevant to an HPL thread, I should think. I wouldn't go off-topic and speak of irrelevant things like handicapped people being marginalized by clergymen, be it rabbis, vicars, or priests. What do you take me for?

                      ...
                      Rudimentary Peni did a song called "Homage a Tod Browning" somewhere in the many tracks they did for their Lovecraft themed concept album: Cacophony. I'd post it, but nobody's posted it to Youtube. Well, as I said it's in the album, the entirety of which is on Youtube.

                      Originally posted by Octo Seven View Post
                      ...
                      Although it wouldn't be ironic to an isolated person who had a fearful childhood. I think Dunwich Horror and Beyond The Wall of Sleep are great examples of his ideas on isolated communities asides from the obvious Innsmouth debacle. I wonder if the idea of those communities could be something akin to the mental landscape of a shut-in who is reminded too often of his noble but corrupted ancestry?
                      Oh. There's that need for clarification again. I meant more that it's ironic to me that this one isolated person would fear isolated communities of people. But, yeah, if he was raised to fear lower class strangers, people of colour etc., then it makes a sort of sense. However, I keep stumbling upon him writing in letters about being rather happy during his childhood. Though maybe he's referring to the period before the family fortune was lost, or just being circumspect and not airing family troubles.
                      Last edited by Heresiologist; 05-29-2015, 08:56 PM.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Octo Seven View Post
                        Originally posted by krakenten View Post
                        "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
                        Aha! Microbiology 101!
                        Miqque
                        ... just another sailor on the seas of Fate, dogpaddling desperately ...

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Miqque View Post
                          Originally posted by Octo Seven View Post
                          Originally posted by krakenten View Post
                          "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
                          Aha! Microbiology 101!
                          How about in a drop of water? Tardigrades are ancient like great old ones and can slumber and wake like dead cthulhu:
                          http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150...imals-on-earth

                          And like the oceans teeming with deep ones, according to the Cosmos 2.0, there are a billion of them for every one of us.



                          Note: level of fear may vary -- some viewers may even be left with feelings of wonder rather than squick.

                          Comment


                          • Lovecraft seemed uneasy about the more primitive life forms-fungi, cephalopods, and the like were not his favorites.

                            He liked cats.

                            Tardigrades seem to be very sturdy creatures indeed-intelligent life may be a dead end, but the tardigrades will go on into the future.

                            I find myself much occupied with endings, of late. I think seeing the film of "Children of Men" really brought mortality home to me. Mankind must perish, like all things, but recently the stark fact of it occupies my mind.

                            Beginnings are difficult, ends are sad, middles are where life is good.

                            Funny, I only watched it because of the scene of the pig inflatables at Battersea Power Station reminded me of WWII London's barrage balloons-talk about iconic!-but I found the film fascinating.

                            The end(mankind is by no means saved, there is some slim hope, not much)deeply moved me.

                            An aside-contemplate, if you will, humanity recovering from this infertility plague. I can see vast problems-just as our current Great Dying(end of the baby boom,possible mass extinction looming).

                            Now remember, the Great Old Ones plan for Clearing Off the Earth after the return of Yog-Sathoth and the re-establshment of their rule....eerie, innit?

                            Comment


                            • Woke up this morning,as usual 5am(oh, how I hate that!)and flipped the remote for something for the hour I lie quietly and think.

                              Dr. Who was engaged in battle with the Weeping Angels-I maintain that there is a strong HPL connection there. The Angels are ancient,cthonic beings, just as malevolent as they can be-and as patient as they are malevolent.

                              They can only move when nobody can see them-Lovecraft's monsters mostly acted when out of sight-one of the most effective techniques in horror fiction. The unseen is the most frightening-brief glimpses, then the big reveal.

                              Monster movie standard fare-because it works.

                              Dr. Who's opposition is always out of the deep past-Daleks, the Cybermen,the Weeping Angels, Ice Warriors, all of them come from Way Back When, and have been out of circulation for quite a while.

                              (An aside-I was looking at a site with old toys(pictures are fine with me, but I don't want to own them again) and there was the Tom Corbett Space Academy, and among the figures was a robot that was indeed a Cyberman, antlers and all. This came on the market in 1953(I had one) and Marx toys were sold in the UK. I'll say no more.)

                              There is more than a little of HPL's influence in the tales of the Time Lord.

                              Comment

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