Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Dungeons & Dragons Alignment Charts Should Be Used For NPCs Too

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • Sir John Barbican Begg
    SpamBot
    • Oct 2008
    • 2479

    Dungeons & Dragons Alignment Charts Should Be Used For NPCs Too

    Dungeons & Dragons Alignment Charts Should Be Used For NPCs Too

    ... and its concept of alignment draws heavily from stories by Michael Moorcock. Prior to Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, D&D featured the alignment ...

    More...
  • zilch
    Hisashiburi
    • Aug 2006
    • 644

    #2
    I find it really hard to be consistent on alignment in D&D, I find it depends more on my mood that day than the alignment I chose for the character or NPC. Some folk swear at the idea of aligment rather than swear by it.
    http://final-frame-final.blogspot.com/

    Comment

    • Rothgo
      Champion of the Unbalanced
      • Aug 2006
      • 6629

      #3
      Odd that D&D had a more demanding definition that the "left & right" terms used by the modern world. Though I guess the good/evil access is tricky there: I mean, a non-evil political party?!
      I end to define good/evil as altruistic/selfish.
      Law/chaos is trickier: could be authoritarian/anarchistic; long-term/short-term; group-focused/individual-focused; predicable/risk-taker
      Many options you could pick, though the main thing is that paladins are total tossers obvs.

      Comment

      • Heresiologist
        Mothra Worshipper
        • Jan 2012
        • 982

        #4
        Since I do not fondly remember alignment arguments from back in the D&D day, a couple years ago when I started playing D&D with my daughter and some of her buddies, I threw out alignment.

        Meanwhile in the game world, in-game lore said goblins weren't all bad, but hobgoblins, since they were goblins who "changed greatly for the worse" after cannibalizing other goblins, actually were considered evil. So, of course, hobgoblins are the big-bads of the first adventure, which involves exploring a seemingly long abandoned fortified border house in search of some stolen village goats. After finding and making friends with a small troop of goblins who were starved and abused by the hobgoblins (and forced to steal the goats), the player's characters surprise the hobgoblins (who were busy sharpening their rusty cleavers in preparation for slaughtering the goats).

        Three of the players want to charge in swords swinging. The fourth wants to talk because the hobgoblins might be misunderstood monsters. Arguments ensue. Seeking to speed things along, I suggest that the Hobgoblins are sort of like this fantasy world's Nazis. "Not all Nazis were bad" is the swiftly delivered retort. Going much darker than the bit of light fantasy fun I had planned for the game, I quickly pivot to "okay, then they are like the Nazis who worked in the death camps or death squads." The put 'em to the sword faction carries the day and first round surprise plus second round initiative means my mighty boss-fight hobgoblins are all felled without landing a single blow.

        Later I learn from the would be negotiator's mom that she had a grandparent (or maybe great grandparent) who was in the Wehrmacht--and that she wasn't happy about the other players overruling her and slaughtering the hobgoblins. I reflect that it is harder than I thought to escape the dreaded alignment arguments. I also resolve to add more in game lore about the evils of hobgoblins (note: the players got pretty wound up when they learned hobgoblins hunt unicorns). Later, I arrange a special "true dream from the gods" interlude for the negotiator's PC that allows the whole group to replay the hobgoblin encounter and confirm that the hobgoblin response to talk is violence.
        Last edited by Heresiologist; 06-08-2021, 02:58 PM.

        Comment

        • zilch
          Hisashiburi
          • Aug 2006
          • 644

          #5
          You can have fun playing a lawfully "good" character whose actions are quite ruthless, blinded by piety. When I am DMing I focus more on motivations than alignments.
          http://final-frame-final.blogspot.com/

          Comment

          Working...
          X