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Kubuntu - best desktop version of Linux I've ever used

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  • Reinart der Fuchs
    Mr. The Fox
    • May 2006
    • 4708

    Kubuntu - best desktop version of Linux I've ever used

    I have always been a Linux proponent since about 1998, and Windows detractor since about 1994. My experiences with both server technologies have always proven that Linux is the operating system with the greatest security, reliability and value. In recent years I have used Suse, Fedora, Redhat Enterprise, Gentoo and Ubuntu among others.

    I have never suggested that Linux be used as a desktop system until now. For the last several weeks I have been using Kubuntu, which has served me well and has proven to be secure, reliable and a great value. If you've ever considered playing with Linux now is the time. You can try it on your existing computer without destroying what you have by trying the Live CD edition of Kubuntu. If you like it, you can eventually install it upon your computer to replace Windows. Or, you can use the CD and never install the thing.

    The people I've encountered in the Kubuntu community are the kindest Linux people I've encountered to date. I hope you'll take a look.

    Kubuntu
    http://www.kubuntu.org/

    Free Kubuntu CD
    https://shipit.kubuntu.org/
    Infinite complexity according to simple rules.
  • M-A_19
    Citizen of Tanelorn
    • Mar 2004
    • 206

    #2
    hopeully this week I'll get a chance to remove Kubuntu from the last Linux box we have running it and switch back to the purity of debian testing.

    I too heard a lot of good things about ubuntu, and being a fan of the KDE desktop installed Kubuntu on my main development box, and a few of the pool laptops at work. I was not impressed

    KDE is a developers desktop, if I didn't want the developer stuff, I'd use Gnome, the first thing I discovered about Kubuntu was that it was not a developers distro. No Make and no GCC, so no compiling packages without a quick round of aptituding. Not good.

    So I aptituded the packages I wanted and set up my desktop apps (points to Kubuntu for including Katapult by default!,Katapult rocks!) then I had to take the machines off the ADSL and onto the local LAN, which meant unplugging and switching the network cables.

    On all other distros I've used, you can bring the network up and down using the init.d scripts, but Kubuntu doesn't only use this system to come back up. I had to reboot each box to get the networking back up. Not Good. If I wanted to reboot the machine every time I made a system change, I'd install windows.

    I just hope that Kubuntu doesn't ruin Debian's good name.
    \"It got worse. He needed something to cure himself. What? he asked. M-A 19 he answered.\"

    Comment

    • Reinart der Fuchs
      Mr. The Fox
      • May 2006
      • 4708

      #3
      Originally posted by M-A_19
      On all other distros I've used, you can bring the network up and down using the init.d scripts, but Kubuntu doesn't only use this system to come back up. I had to reboot each box to get the networking back up. Not Good. If I wanted to reboot the machine every time I made a system change, I'd install windows.

      I just hope that Kubuntu doesn't ruin Debian's good name.
      I agree with the networking thing. Kubuntu won't ruin Debian's good name.
      Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

      Comment

      • Reinart der Fuchs
        Mr. The Fox
        • May 2006
        • 4708

        #4
        Originally posted by M-A_19
        On all other distros I've used, you can bring the network up and down using the init.d scripts, but Kubuntu doesn't only use this system to come back up. I had to reboot each box to get the networking back up. Not Good. If I wanted to reboot the machine every time I made a system change, I'd install windows.
        I can confirm the disappointing lack of networking ease. Wireless restart stinks. I expect them to work these things out. I hope.
        Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

        Comment

        • danskmacabre
          Defender of the Runestaff
          • Sep 2006
          • 377

          #5
          Again, regarding Wifi compatibility.

          I have installed various version of Linux in the past (as recent as a few months ago) and whilst the install went almost flawlessly, the support for Wifi cards is pretty bad, even when I usee Ndis wrapper, it still wouldn't work.
          I an using a belkin wifi card, which is common enough.

          If this would work properly, I would happily goto Linux.

          Comment

          • Reinart der Fuchs
            Mr. The Fox
            • May 2006
            • 4708

            #6
            Originally posted by danskmacabre
            Again, regarding Wifi compatibility.

            I have installed various version of Linux in the past (as recent as a few months ago) and whilst the install went almost flawlessly, the support for Wifi cards is pretty bad, even when I usee Ndis wrapper, it still wouldn't work.
            I an using a belkin wifi card, which is common enough.

            If this would work properly, I would happily goto Linux.
            In some cases you actually have to do a little kernel customization to support BIG MEM. Just another layer of pain to deal with. With Kubuntu, it wasn't a problem, but if you loose your connection, and need to reconnect, in the worst case, you have to restart the laptop. That's almost anti-Linux.
            Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

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            • danskmacabre
              Defender of the Runestaff
              • Sep 2006
              • 377

              #7
              I'll download the latest version of kubuntu and have a go at it again over the weekend.
              I have a desktop Pc spare with a wifi card to play with.

              Could be a nice change to have a linux desktop, instead of the Windows desktop.

              Comment

              • danskmacabre
                Defender of the Runestaff
                • Sep 2006
                • 377

                #8
                I just downloaded kubuntu and burned a CD.
                Tried to load it up from teh CD for a laugh to see if it would work first time.

                The wifi card was found, but wouldn't enable, however, after checking some documentation online, it seems the ndis wrapper prefers realtek wireless drivers instead of using the belkin drivers, so I'll try that tomorrow maybe (Couldn't wait until the weekend )

                I'll let you know how it goes if you're interested.

                Comment

                • invalid nickname
                  SailorOnTheSeasOfCheese
                  • Mar 2005
                  • 75

                  #9
                  I work with a guy that swears by Kubuntu, but before that he swore by gentoo... Personally i would just stick with Debian, unless you need a live cd, in which case Knoppix would be my first choice.

                  Comment

                  • Reinart der Fuchs
                    Mr. The Fox
                    • May 2006
                    • 4708

                    #10
                    I switched to the lighter Xubuntu and am satisfied.
                    Infinite complexity according to simple rules.

                    Comment

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