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The Mobile 'Phone Text Message As Experimental Fiction

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  • The Mobile 'Phone Text Message As Experimental Fiction

    Has anyone tried using the TXT message as a form of ultra-flashfiction?

    I've been trying it out lately.

    I texted this to my friend S:

    'Ideas are shoals of blowlamps, coalescing and dispersing in the cold azure of the icy tarn of our minds. Sometimes they fire up all together, and the nebulous glow suffuses the depths'

    She TXTed back:

    'Wot?'

    Bloody Philistine. It's got potential though, eh? Eh?

  • #2
    Re: The Mobile 'Phone Text Message As Experimental Fiction

    Originally posted by Perdix
    Has anyone tried using the TXT message as a form of ultra-flashfiction?
    No, but I'm a neo-Luddite of the reformed sect. I use computers
    and high-bandwidth communications technology, but own no mobile
    phone. You example holds out possibilities for the technology, of
    course.

    Originally posted by Perdix

    I've been trying it out lately.

    I texted this to my friend S:

    'Ideas are shoals of blowlamps, coalescing and dispersing in the cold azure of the icy tarn of our minds. Sometimes they fire up all together, and the nebulous glow suffuses the depths'
    Excellent. And her civilized response:

    Originally posted by Perdix

    She TXTed back:

    'Wot?'

    Bloody Philistine. It's got potential though, eh? Eh?
    She should have apologised, whereupon you could have
    TXTed back:

    "Apologies are like arsewipes: they should be disposed of as
    quickly as possible, and without undue examination."

    "Pull out her eyes
    Apologise
    Apologise
    Pull out her eyes."

    Of course, people need training to deliver proper straightlines,
    especially via TXT.

    Pity.

    LSN

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    • #3
      My sister-in-(common)law received a similar gem from her new partner, and inadvertently forwarded it to her mother, provoking concerns that she "must be on LSD" (which is coincidentally [or maybe not] true...)

      It must be time for the first TXT novel. People conduct whole relationships through the bloody things.

      (I also don't have a mobile.) :oops:
      \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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      • #4
        There was a story in the news some time last year bemoaning the worsening standards of literacy of UK secondary school leavers.

        The crux of the story was a girl at a comprehensive who wrote a school essay filled with 'textisms', in place of conventional syntax and grammar.
        Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

        Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

        Comment


        • #5
          Heehee! I'll remember that about apologies, LSN.

          Actually, I hate my mobile. It's supposed to be high-impact-resistant (I'm so rugged) but I dropped it and now it'll only vibrate. I walked out on a client earlier who answered her phone in the middle of my consult. Dozy cow.

          A TXT Novel could get pricey, couldn't it?! :)

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          • #6
            This could grow into a challenge. TXT versions of fave Moorcockian tomes. Luddites excused of course (couldn't cope with RSI of the thumb).
            \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Mikey_C
              . . .
              It must be time for the first TXT novel. People conduct whole relationships through the bloody things.
              You must redefine what you mean by "novel" of course, because
              sending sufficient text to render a proper narrative experience would
              be cumbersome at best.

              Curiously, back in the early 20th Century (remember then?),
              the French writer Max Jacob wrote a collection of fascinating
              compressed 1-paragraph stories that distilled the essence of
              his narratives. They're called something like "The Serial Novel" in
              English. I need to go look them up again (it seems as if it has been
              since the early 20th C. that I've read these works).

              You could post Jacob's little "novels" via TXT quite easily.

              Originally posted by Mikey_C
              (I also don't have a mobile.) :oops:
              Te absolvo, mon enfant. :lol:

              LSN

              Comment


              • #9
                GHOTI

                _____________
                "fish" that is!! :D

                I L C U L8R
                \"Bush\'s army of barmy bigots is the worst thing that\'s happened to the US in some years...\"
                Michael Moorcock - 3am Magazine Interview

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by Perdix
                  A TXT Novel could get pricey, couldn't it?! :)
                  After you text your first novel, I suspect you'd make it into Ripley's Believe It Or Not, but not because of the first novel on a cell, but because of your 600 kilo thumbs.
                  The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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                  • #11
                    I started to write my TXT Magnum Opus:

                    In Katmandu did the Aga Khan,
                    (In a state of leisure, some agree)...


                    When some bloke from Porlock called about selling me a new mobile.

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