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Einstein's warp effect

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  • Einstein's warp effect

    Hello,

    I'm back after a long absence!

    I saw this report on BBC News online: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3762852.stm

    So it seems Einstein was right and large celestial bodies, like the Earth, bend time and space out of shape. That raises some odd ideas... like what would happen if an astronaut moved far enough into space to escape the warp effect? Would his perception of passing time cease? Could it be that our sense of time - of Being even - is dependent on the warping?

    Stretch your senses beyond the turbulence and you can hear the sound of OM, maybe.

    Lupus (aka Stiletto Blade)
    www.sextonblake.co.uk

  • #2
    I would think so based on the article. There is probably a lot on the subject in conjunction with Black Holes and Dark Matter.

    Damn you, now I've another topic to research!!! :D

    Many authors especially Moorcock and Lovecraft make references ti this effect. Maybe they've done some research into this as well. Perhaps you should start a "Possibilities of an Actual Multiverse" thread.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Einstein's warp effect

      [quote="Lupus"]Hello,

      I'm back after a long absence!

      I saw this report on BBC News online: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3762852.stm

      So it seems Einstein was right and large celestial bodies, like the Earth, bend time and space out of shape. That raises some odd ideas... like what would happen if an astronaut moved far enough into space to escape the warp effect? Would his perception of passing time cease? Could it be that our sense of time - of Being even - is dependent on the warping?


      Would we be able to get to an area without spacial warping? Is that possible? Or is space/time sealed off into a cosmic bubble, the universe? :?

      Comment


      • #4
        If I understand what was meant in the article by drag, then perhaps this warp effect it is something that follows a massive body. Rather like the turbulence that follows an aircraft, which is always entering clean air (ideally), giving reliable lift.
        Which begs the question - Are we getting any lift, and if so, where are we flying to?
        (Perhaps metaphors just serve to confuse and complicate things!)
        You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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        Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

        :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


        "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

        Comment


        • #5
          Time...

          Hi...
          I think it was Timothy Leary who said something like,we are at the bottom of a gravity well.
          With words to the effect that this altered everything about the way we think.
          He also proposed to get off the planet and go and find somebody interesting to talk to.
          The brain chemistry is altered by zero G,so perhaps there is real evidence to suggest that with a life in zero G our very thought process may be come altered.
          As far as time warping,for the astronaut time would continue at his onboard constant,remembering that time is relative.
          His clocks however would be effected by whatever gravity well he happened to be near.
          Should be totally free of gravitational influences,his time would be a constant, altered only in relation to his velocity.
          Having typed this out,I must add that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing and I have very much a little knowledge :lol:
          Nigel.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Einstein's warp effect

            Hi !

            Yes of course: Einstein was right.
            More or less, he said that gravitation deform the frame of space-time. And many experiences validated this claim. This has been known for many years.
            Moreover, gravitation (ie macroscopic action of matter) is not an action remotely instantaneous .. but a field: physicists think that like for the 3 other forces in the universe (electromagnetism, weak nuclear and strong nuclear), gravitation acts thanks to particles (gravitons) or a wave (the gravitation field).
            Remark: In fact they think it acts thanks to particules AND waves (this is the usual duality particule/wave from quantum mechanics).
            But anyway, the point is that if the celestial body does not move, then deformation of space-time is not the same (more or lmess like a ball of bowling put on an elastic surface). But if it moves, then there is a shift between the body an its gravitational field (like if you make roll the ball: the deformation of the elastic surface will be a little "late").
            OK, maybe I have been very obscure.
            The main point is that it is not a question of perception !!! Time really pass slowly if you are submitted to a gravitational field, or if you undergo a strong acceleration !!!

            Bye, Damien

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Einstein's warp effect

              [quote="Uthorion"]Hi !

              then deformation of space-time is not the same

              sorry, there is a mistake, have to read:
              "then deformation of space-time is the same as if it was an instantaneous action"

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Einstein's warp effect

                Originally posted by Lupus
                So it seems Einstein was right and large celestial bodies, like the Earth, bend time and space out of shape. That raises some odd ideas... like what would happen if an astronaut moved far enough into space to escape the warp effect? Would his perception of passing time cease? Could it be that our sense of time - of Being even - is dependent on the warping?
                But wouldn't the astronaut also be warping spacetime? Clearly not as much as the Earth, but there should be some warp.

                And even if time, in some sense, ceased, so would the astronaut, so I'm not sure how he could perceive it to cease.

                Or am I missing something?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Indeed

                  Indeed the astronaut would have his accompanying warp,miniscule in relation to the matter of his ship,but,dependant upon his velocity...
                  Potentialy huge.
                  but,would his time,onboard his ship,been seen,by him to slow?
                  Surely he would require some outside comparrison.
                  I remember the experiment with the two nuclear clocks,one on the ground and one in a jet.
                  Over a given period of time,the two were found to have slipped minutely out of sync.
                  So given that a jet has small mass,and relatively small velocity,and the slipping out of sync was still recordable....
                  Our astronaut is going to experience a big difference in time's passage,but only relative to an outside point.
                  It would be hard,I would imagine to find anywhere where time is not affected by both mass and velocity,the universe is itself expanding,so who's time is THE time?
                  Perhaps that is also related to quantum physics,in as much the observer has a direct influence upon the result.
                  Terentek.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    so who's time is THE time?
                    That's easy...

                    In the absence of any clearly decisive ownership, I hearby announce to the scientific community, to everyone here, and to the entire universe/multiverse/omniverse and to anything that may not be containined within that I, the Eighth Son, do hearby possess the singular, one and only, correct timeframe reference thingumadoodarwhatchacallitajig, to be used as the singular, one and only, unique time-space origin, in perpetuity throughout the whole of existence inclusive of whatever came before or afterwards.

                    If anyone has any cause to dispute this claim, feel free to submit the proper claim forms to my lawyer in triplicate by two days ago.

                    There.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Cool

                      :lol:
                      Cool,I'll go with that.
                      Terentek.
                      :)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TheEighthSon
                        so who's time is THE time?
                        That's easy...

                        In the absence of any clearly decisive ownership, I hearby announce to the scientific community, to everyone here, and to the entire universe/multiverse/omniverse and to anything that may not be containined within that I, the Eighth Son, do hearby possess the singular, one and only, correct timeframe reference thingumadoodarwhatchacallitajig, to be used as the singular, one and only, unique time-space origin, in perpetuity throughout the whole of existence inclusive of whatever came before or afterwards.

                        If anyone has any cause to dispute this claim, feel free to submit the proper claim forms to my lawyer in triplicate by two days ago.

                        There.
                        I'm glad I've found you, because I have a question...

                        What time is it?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Tea time.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Tea Time!

                            Cool...
                            Always tea time,just like in Alice...
                            I wanna be the refered to Bat,I always wanted to twinkle up high.
                            Um.....
                            Whatever happend to the thread?.....
                            I must have fell asleep,I had the most curious dream,all about time and gravity wells,oh yes,and there was an astronaut... I think.
                            Terentek.

                            Comment

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