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Favorite Comics of All Time

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  • SeeDoubleYou
    replied
    Darkhawk, can't remember which issues, but was deeply satisfied

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  • Octo Seven
    replied
    Halo Jones is brilliant, just a damn shame it's unfinished.

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    I saw the Halo Jones other day, I was tempted to buy it, but I had already bought a Sandman recollection "Fables And Dreams".

    Leave a comment:


  • The English Assassin
    replied
    I'm indifferent to the League (except the art), but I concur Swamp Thing and From Hell are my favourites, along with Halo Jones of course! My interest in Watchmen and V has somewhat waned of late... I still admire them and tbh it might just be a case of over familiarity...

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  • Octo Seven
    replied
    I'd agree on From Hell being his best comic. I love them all though.

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    Originally posted by Rothgo View Post
    I've just finished a re-read of Moore's Swamp Thing. Splendid for what they were, but very clearly an "early work" if one was to borrow novelist terminology. The League is probably his most entertaining work of late, but From Hell must surely take the title as his magnum opus to date?
    I havent read From Hell yet. To my own fault.
    Plan to buy it of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rothgo
    replied
    I've just finished a re-read of Moore's Swamp Thing. Splendid for what they were, but very clearly an "early work" if one was to borrow novelist terminology. The League is probably his most entertaining work of late, but From Hell must surely take the title as his magnum opus to date?

    Leave a comment:


  • zlogdan
    replied
    Well, let me stay only in my top 5:

    Watchmen: Do I have to tell why without being obvious ? The most dark super-heroes comics ever made, a multi layered story.

    Sandman: everything It was a pain that in Brazil the title had lots of temporary cancels and it took 10 years to read the whole thing, but I had the 76 issues and I bought them all when they were out. I am buying the omnibuses. So far I am only missing 2 of them. My favorite is The World's End.

    Moonshadow: By JM De Matteis it is a real journey to the self and blossoming and a piece about the loss of innocence.

    The Life In The Big City, Will Eisner, a portrait of every city we know by the eyes of a man who knew better. Plus they bundled the magnificent The Building in here.

    League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen 1-5 plus Black Dossier. I was almost putting the Swamp Thing saga here since it was the first contact with Alan Moore and I REALLY like it a lot, but I am reading the League again and I like it more and more.

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  • RedBstrd
    replied
    Oh, man. I don't know where to start with my favorite comic books...

    The Maxx by Sam Kieth would have to rank pretty highly due to the art, the strong female characters, the originality of the storytelling, and the maturity of the themes it explores. When I was around 14 years old, I stopped reading comics because I naively thought that the medium wasn't capable of telling sophisticated stories. The Maxx was always the one exception I made. Likewise, Watchmen by Alan Moore has to be in my top two or three comics of all time. In my mid-20s, I saw it on a New York Times list of best novels of all time and wondered what the hell a comic book was doing there. After reading it, I knew and instantly dropped all of my snobbishness toward the medium, becoming an unapologetic fan of comics.

    Other favorites:

    The Boys by Garth Ennis - probably my favorite comic. The way it deconstructs the superhero genre for me is parallel to what Watchmen accomplished in its time. It will likely never be as influential but the length of the comic's run gave it the scope to explore more than Watchmen could.

    All-Star Superman by Grant Morrison - Nietzsche's challenge to mankind was to make ourselves into gods and imbue meaning into our lives after what he called the death of God (i.e. science has stripped religion of its ability to provide much of mankind with an all-encompassing meaning). Morrison's All-Star Superman explores what is instead demanded in a world faced with the death of Superman.

    American Vampire by Scott Snyder

    The Cape by Joe Hill

    Chew by John Layman - Hilarious and unconventional enough to be addicting.

    Daredevil by Brian Michael Bendis - I never believed that anyone could do anything exciting with Daredevil as a character, being unimpressed even with Frank Miller's run on the hero. Bendis's writing for Daredevil knocked my socks off, so to speak.

    Elephantmen by Richard Starkings - The comic takes an unusual approach to a war story by starting with the reintegration of combatants (in this case mutant animals) into civilian life. It starts out scatterbrained but develops a narrative quickly.

    Ex Machina by Brian K Vaughan - Amazing art and a story that deals with politics and corruption. The world's only superhero is the Great Machine, who retired after a generally unimpressive superhero career and instead won an election to mayor of New York City. All of the superhero dimensions of the story only come through flashbacks.

    Fables by Bill Willingham - Like Gaiman's classic Sandman, Fables is a story about stories. At times, it's really touching, while in others it is pretty funny or exciting. It has the epic feel of good fantasy literature.

    Faker by Mike Carey - Surprisingly emotional. Not a superhero story.

    Four Women by Sam Kieth - Kieth is one of the best feminist comic book writers and his work covers some seriously mature and sophisticated topics. It's not a superhero book.

    I Kill Giants by Joe Kelly and Ken Niimura - I can't say much about I Kill Giants without spoiling it, but the story is all kinds of heartbreaking... in a good way.

    Infinite Vacation by Chris Roberson - Excellent art matched by an exciting story and interesting characters.

    Invincible by Robert Kirkman - In my opinion, the best neo-Silver book ongoing today. Comics shouldn't even be allowed to be this good.

    Irredeemable by Mark Waid - Another "What if Superman was evil?" books but done in a way that keeps us on our toes. Waid is at his best in the book.

    iZombie by Chris Roberson

    Kick-Ass by Mark Millar - Better than the movie, which was great.

    Locke and Key by Joe Hill

    Midnighter by Warren Ellis, Garth Ennis, and Brian K Vaughan - I have a soft spot for the Midnighter-Apollo romance, not to mention the kind of stories that writers like this series has can produce.

    Morning Glories by Nick Spencer - I don't know exactly where the plot is developing but the comic is all kinds of addictive.

    Planetary by Warren Ellis

    Popbot by Ashley Wood - Wood is one of my favorite artists, but be warned that his Popbot is really weird. If you like Sam Kieth, then you'll probably like Ashley Wood.

    Powers by Brian Michael Bendis - A great series with a cool noir feel. I'm a fanboy for Retro Girl.

    Preacher by Garth Ennis - Amazing characters and even better character development. Ennis is a master of dialogue and has a dark sense of humor. Preacher pushes buttons and is a must-read.

    Runaways by Brian K Vaughan - Along with Bendis's Daredevil and Kirkman's Invincible, Runaways is one of the best books to take the realism and concern with everyday life that Modern or Iron-age comics had but add traditional notions of heroism. It's a story where a group of kids realize that their parents are supervillains. Amazing through and through... except when Vaughan hands the project over to a less capable writer.

    Saga by Brian K Vaughan and Fiona Staples - Just read it. It's good for you.

    The Stuff of Legend by Mike Raicht - A story about toys crossing over into a hostile world after the Boogeyman kidnaps their owner and drags him through the closet. Toy Story for adults, I guess.

    Sweet Tooth by Jeff Lemire

    The Umbrella Academy by Gerard Way - Surprisingly good. I didn't even know about the author's main claim to fame (in music).

    V for Vendetta by Alan Moore

    The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman - Better than the show. Seriously, much, much better than the show.

    We3 by Grant Morrison - I know the author isn't popular here, but this book is great.

    Y: the Last Man by Brian K Vaughan - This should be required reading.

    Zero Girl by Sam Kieth

    Since I'm a graduate student in History, I also read a lot of history through comics. The best, IMHO, include:

    American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang

    Habibi by Craig Thompson

    Incognegro by Mat Johnson

    Maus by Art Spiegelman

    Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

    Pride of Baghdad by Brian K Vaughan

    I love tons of other books and can't comment on all of the ones I like, so I'm sure that I missed some really good stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ulric Skarsol
    replied
    Chastity
    Purgatori
    Lady Death
    Evil Ernie
    Red Sonja, the original Marvel Series
    Ghita
    Vampirella, both companies
    The Avengers
    The Defenders
    X-Men
    Excalibur
    JLA
    JSA

    Leave a comment:


  • Frankish Philosopher
    replied
    My favorite comic series is, hands down, Dave Sim's Cerebus. The four volume Mothers and Daughters arc is, in particular, my favorite piece of comic art.

    Leave a comment:


  • Selkirk
    replied
    favorites...

    i always loved the jim/frank comics by jim woodring(super fantastic and twisted). i also thought first comics did a good job handling corum/elric(the corum series is really strong).

    Leave a comment:


  • Starsailor
    replied
    All time faves:

    Elfquest

    Grendel

    Sandman

    Preacher

    Cerebus

    Y - The Last Man

    Leave a comment:


  • pdwright42
    replied
    Hmmm... The last great comic I read was ASTRO BOY. But, I've enjoyed the Warren mags, WATCHMAN, DR. STRANGE. And I used to collect the '90's versions of HEAVY METAl...

    Leave a comment:


  • Kyrinn S. Eis
    replied
    Doom Patrol (Morrison)
    GrimJack
    Suicide Squad (Ostrander)
    The Micronauts (original)

    Leave a comment:

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