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What are you reading/collecting at the moment?

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  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    I did get myself a copy of, The Best of Alf Tupper: The Tough of the Track, which I thoroughly enjoyed. A jobbing welder and Olympic gold medalist track champion, Alf was one of the few non-war related characters in D.C. Thomsons' The Victor comic and is now virtually a piece of Britain's industrial heritage. Not just a wallow in nostalgia.

    Finally got round to getting the first three collected, softcover, Buffy tVS [Season 9] books. Season 8 went a bit awry and although Season 9 has had its moments, so far there does seem to be a danger of it losing focus.

    Will get the rest, if I can, though and I'm tempted to get the Angel & Faith, season too, which has been much better received.

    Not very alternative, I'm afraid.

    Leave a comment:


  • zlogdan
    replied
    I was reading Gaiman's Mister Punch, I had it for a while, but postponed reading it because I found it a bit disturbing, but I decided to go ahead and I am actually loving it. Coincidentally today I bought Gaiman's Ocean At The end of lane and found them both similar because they deal with childhood memories from an adult perspective..

    Leave a comment:


  • zlogdan
    replied
    This gathers a few Alan Moore stories for DC, actually two of my favorites are in this book:

    What happened to the man of tomorrow ?
    And
    For The man who has everything

    Finally have this on hardcover and actual size!
    9 US Dollars that were really worth!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guzzlecrank
    replied
    A book I picked up at random last year that I'm still avidly following is Matt Kindt's ultraparanoid but not humorless Mind Mgmt, which has an auteur art style that's all its own...

    And as Alan Moore's melancholic and otherworldly Fashion Beast draws to a close, Matt Fraction's wizardly collaboration with Mike and Laura Allred, FF, gets better by the month. For my money, that's been the best book by the Big Two in 2013. I've alternately liked or hated Fraction's work on other books, but FF (as differentiated from the flagship title Fantastic Four, which he's also writing) is as good as anything Marvel's ever published: it features a heady mix of well-developed characters, surreal storylines and good-natured irony set in the Allreds' cartoon dreamlands. Makes you think of the Lee/Ditko era and the far future at the same time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pebble
    replied
    Originally posted by Rob Hansen View Post
    Originally posted by Pebble View Post
    Just bought Essential Fantastic Four nos 3 and 4.

    Going through a Kirby phase at the moment and seeing his artwork in black and white is also a joy.
    I think FF #43-#63 - as contained in Essential Fantastic Four #3 - is my favourite ever run of that comic. Also worth getting is Essential Doctor Strange #1. This contains the entirety of Steve Ditko's work on the character and is a revelation. Ditko's early work on Doc is all moody shadows and atmosphere, work flattened and diminished by the limited colour they had to work with during their initial publication. This is one case where b&w is definitely superior to colour.
    Yep, I have the first three Doc Strange's which include the Marvel Premiere issues that rarely got over here. The first Spider-Man volume is great as it contains all Dikto's work.

    Leave a comment:


  • zlogdan
    replied
    Swamp Thing Classic from Len Wein and Wrightson! I actualyl always wanted to read this, now it is on comic stores here I just could not avoid grabbing it! Well, the text and art are superb despite some talking that sounds a bit not natural, but the whole thing has a psychedelic atmosphere mixed with EC comics. I would not say it is better than the Alan Moore books, but it is quite good despite some flaws, which I really think are due to the fact most comics were written that way back in 1972...

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  • Rob Hansen
    replied
    Originally posted by Pebble View Post
    Just bought Essential Fantastic Four nos 3 and 4.

    Going through a Kirby phase at the moment and seeing his artwork in black and white is also a joy.
    I think FF #43-#63 - as contained in Essential Fantastic Four #3 - is my favourite ever run of that comic. Also worth getting is Essential Doctor Strange #1. This contains the entirety of Steve Ditko's work on the character and is a revelation. Ditko's early work on Doc is all moody shadows and atmosphere, work flattened and diminished by the limited colour they had to work with during their initial publication. This is one case where b&w is definitely superior to colour.

    Leave a comment:


  • David Mosley
    replied
    I've decided to take a punt on a new comic (mini-series) from Aspen called Jirni:



    I'm not sure Aspen have a particular reputation for good comics and I won't be surprised if Jirni turns out to be just another common-or-garden T&A comic book but the 'Arabian Nights'-style elements looks like it could a bit different from the usual superhero/mutant fare pushed by the Big Two and Paolo Pantalena's artwork reminds me of Juan Jose Ryp a bit - so at least it might be decent T&A comic book.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris T
    replied
    OK now I just read Grandville for the first time... Whoa, so good!

    And I didn't realise it was in colour.. I bought it on spec due to you guys talking about it here. Never judge a book by it's cover..

    (and another badger! ha)

    Leave a comment:


  • Soko
    replied
    my goodreads profile, it is all there...

    http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/4695052

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris T
    replied
    I've been buying heaps of graphic novels and trades (some floppies too) but I'm currently obsessed with Mike Baron's The Badger via the not so recent IDW reprints. It's goofy comic book action with half a brain. And like all my tragic obsessions the reprints stop at volume 4...

    Similarly I got Garth Ennis' Complete Battlefields volume 1 in paperback, loved it and now I discover volume 2 is only available in hardback...
    (vol 1 is only available in paperback, of course!)

    Leave a comment:


  • RedBstrd
    replied
    Thank you for the suggestion. I'll add it to my list of things to read or catch up on, like the Unwritten by Mike Carey.

    Some day I'll get through all of the books I have to read. I'm also trying to work my way through the complete works of H.P. Lovecraft as well as Fritz Leiber.

    Leave a comment:


  • zlogdan
    replied
    Originally posted by RedBstrd View Post
    Few comics do such a good job at subverting our expectations from the superhero genre and telling superhero stories in such a surprising way.
    Hey I really recommend you J.M DeMatteis and Mark Cavallaro "The Life and Times of Savior 28" if you have not read it yet! Best super hero story since Watchmen IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • RedBstrd
    replied
    Until it stopped, the Boys by Garth Ennis was my favorite ongoing series, doing for the superhero genre today what Watchmen did decades ago. Some people are turned off by Ennis's liberal use of violence but he's a master at character development. In an age where comic book movies (perhaps the most public face of the comic industry) focus so heavily - to my great annoyance - on origin stories rather than character development, Ennis's writing is really refreshing. For anyone who hasn't read the Boys, I highly recommend it. Few comics do such a good job at subverting our expectations from the superhero genre and telling superhero stories in such a surprising way.

    Likewise, Mard Waid's recent Irredeemable was quite good - for a number of similar reasons.

    For comics still running, I'm really enjoying Chew by John Layman, Sweet Tooth by Jeff Lemire, Locke and Key by Joe Hill, American Vampire by Scott Snyder, Morning Glories by Nick Spencer, Powers by Brian Michael Bendis, and the Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman. Kirkman's Invincible is also pretty much at the top of my list despite the fact that I expected it to be completely uninteresting and starting reading as a fluke. To my great surprise, it's bar none the greatest neo-Silver book that I've read.

    Dan the Unharmable by David Lapham is interesting but I don't know where it's going to develop as a story. I'm also reading Hell Yeah by Joe Keatinge, which isn't far enough into the story to show whether it's going to be something worth pulling or not.

    I'm not reading much of anything by Marvel at the moment and the only new 52 stuff by DC which really caught my interest is Lemire's run on Animal Man and Snyder's work on Swamp Thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pebble
    replied
    Just bought Essential Fantastic Four nos 3 and 4.

    Going through a Kirby phase at the moment and seeing his artwork in black and white is also a joy.

    Really only getting Hawkeye as a monthly title and that as a digital download.

    Zogldan - Never got to meet Dave McKean as he came to our printing company one time as we printed his early books, which I did get file copies.

    Leave a comment:

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