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What are you reading/collecting at the moment?

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  • flutegirlrockz
    replied
    Got some Phantom And Mad Magazines for my Multimedia store at the market.

    Leave a comment:


  • David Mosley
    replied
    I added Punisher War Zone, Garth Ennis & Steve Dillon's sequel to the classic "Welcome Back, Frank" limited series of a few years back, and Neonomicon, Alan Moore's new horror comic to my standing order this weekend though they don't come out until the New Year. I'm also re-instating Hellblazer from #251 (having dropped it after #120) since Peter Milligan is taking over the writing reins.

    Picked up issues 2 & 3 of Ambush Bug: Year None at the weekend; probably the best comic I've read all year, especially the sly digs at things like One More Day:
    Lord Neron: I have already divined (if you'll pardon the term) that you wish your lover consigned... ...to eternal damnation!
    Ambush Bug: What--?! No, I just want you to erase our marriage!


    First issue of Battlefields - Garth Ennis' new war comic - arrived last month. The first story, "The Night Witches", is reminiscent of Ennis & Chaykin's War is Hell: The First Flight of the Phantom Eagle (which came out earlier this year) in as much as it looks at war from the POV of new fighter pilots, although 'Night Witches' is about female Russian WW2 pilots rather then male Allied WW1 pilots.

    As I said previously, I was thinking of dropping Wonder Woman now that Terry Dodson's left but having got to #25 this month I'll probably keep it on while Gail Simone's still writing it to see where she takes it. Am currently re-reading the last 12 months worth of issues as I rather skimmed them first time around.

    Dave Sim's follow-up to Cerebus the Aardvark, Glamourpuss, continues apace with his exploration of the photo-realistic art styles of Alex Raymond, Milton Caniff and Hal Foster interspersed with his own photo-realistic 'copies' of fashion magazine ads as part of his satiric critique of the fashion industry. An acquired taste perhaps but well-worth picking up if you have an interest in post-war newspaper comic strips. Or 21st century fashion ads, I guess.

    Morrison & Quitely's run on All-Star Superman finished recently. Highly recommend picking up the trade collections if you missed this gem first time around. Knocks the socks off the car-crash that is Frank Miller & Jim Lee's All-Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder.

    Speaking of Morrison, I was minded to get Final Crisis but my LCR doesn't seem to get it 'on spec' so I've only read the first issue. Likewise I've missed some issues of Chaykin's Punisher War Journal, so I'll have to source them from the Internet.

    Leave a comment:


  • J-Sun
    replied
    New Warriors is ending. I'm hoping it ends with a bang, as opposed to the fizzle Heroes for Hire ended with. They've killed a lot of main characters off. Interesting to see if they bring them back.

    Solomon Kane comic is great so far. Really captures with the art and the storytelling what feels to be the essense of the tales.

    X-Force has impressed me more than I expected.

    And for me, the big news...
    Cloak and Dagger are coming back for a limited series!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Wolfshead
    replied
    I gave up comic collecting in my college years. Not that I had anything against, I'm no snob, but I had slowed down when the cost went from 12 cents to a quarter, hey budgets were tight, and I found I could buy paperbacks for $.50-.60. To me the story was always the important part. Didn't learn to appreciate the art until later. Even then I might have gotten back into it later when funds flowed better if not for one small fact.

    When I left for college in '74 I took my entire collection, mainly Marvel titles collected over the prevous dozen or so years with a number of Silver Age firsts and put them in my dresser. Took up over 3 full drawers space wise. I didn't need the space, my clothes were going to school with me. Left my darlings sadly behind but until I knew what was going on dorm wise, having been already warned of overcrowding, I couldn't take them along. By Christmas break the dorm situation had been ironed out and I had made plans to have someone drive me back rather than fly since I was lugging a dorm fridge with me so i figured the comics could go also. Got home and went to my dresser and, instead of my collection, found 3 drawers full of linens. After letting out a scream that was probavly herad a mile or more away I found out that my mother, having done her holiday cleaning, thought my "unused" dresser was perfect for storing her linens. Asked where my comics had gone I was informed that she didn't think I really wanted or needed them any more and the Boy Scouts had been having a charity paper drive for the holidays so she donated them. Good bye Spidey 1. So long inaugural X-Men. Adios the entire run of Conan to that time, both the comics and the oversized $1 specials. Never had the inclination to start in again after that, just stuck with books and used the extra money to buy special editions of certain favorites such as Archival Press' edition of the Vanishing Tower.

    Now after all that wordiness, to get back on topic, while I have given up on comics my daughter has come to love manga after I started allowing her to watch different anime and she found out they were based on books. So I have started purchasing manga for her, tho of course I do indulge in the guilty pleasure myself. Latest purchase was the Bleach collection 1, first 21 volumes, which she is getting either for her birthday or Christmas.

    herb

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Coyote
    replied
    Moon Knights story has alway been twisted and violent
    I havn't been reading the TBolts run but there seems to be the underlying theme of redemption and revenge in the story, although I'm not sure for who.
    The TBolts do get to take on a real cape and seem very happy about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • J-Sun
    replied
    Ive been collecting Thunderbolts since issue 1. Had a letter printed in the back even in the past year or so. I loved Niciezas run on the series, but was not a fan of Ellis on the book. Gage is doing a good job.

    But for Moon Knight... man, the TBolts are getting around. Theyre popping up in EVERY book. I do hope they get back to the theme of redemption. It was a brilliant book at one time, but seems to be floundering, revelling in having bad guys on a team, and doing little more than show a lot of violence. Its picking up a bit, but still seems directionless.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Coyote
    replied
    Just got Issue 4 CB and MI13 & MoonKnight 21,22
    I think I like what there doing with the CB and MI13 story, gearing up for there super group vs all the supernatural evil The British Lands have to offer. I still wanting to see what they do with Union Jack. All ways liked that character.
    I don't know what I think about "The Death of Marc Spector" yet. But his
    I hoping for a Werewolf by Night vs Venom before its all over.

    Leave a comment:


  • J-Sun
    replied
    Just finally started reading Astro City.

    I know, I know. Way overdue.
    And yes... I can see what all the hype is about. Good good stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave Hardy
    replied
    Not too long ago I picked up a reprint of Texas History Movies. A 1930s era cartoon history of Texas. It was a major influence on Jack Jackson, who started off doing underground comix about about Comanche Indians and ended up a notable Texas historian.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rothgo
    replied
    Just read the first two books of Gّdland - Casey and Scioli. Great fun and a good revisiting of a Kirbesque stylistic without being a dull 60/70s pastiche. The usual issues with what to do with a truly super-powerful hero are clearly there (what excuse this time as to why this rumble didn't end in 1 millisecond?) but its still well worth the read.
    Fun but no must-have.
    'Cept I must now get books three and four...

    Leave a comment:


  • J-Sun
    replied
    Well, David, I'll take you up on that challenge if I can.
    Although you may not like it, I think the new series is fantastic. But here's the history of the series.

    Claremont recently was given the chance to restart Excalibur. Lineup was Capt Britain, Juggernaut, Nocturne, Sage, Pete Wisdom, and Dazzler, with the Black Knight in for around half a year. The line-up was interesting, the story was terrible. It ran 24 issues, and thankfully died at the same time Exiles died. The 2 comics coalesced into a single title called Die By the Sword, where the two teams combined and Claremont got to restart the New Exiles with his favorite characters.

    I love what Claremont did for the industry years ago, but New Excalibur was terrible, and honestly New Exiles is bad too. I don't know if the guy ran out of ideas or what, but the stories are so bland I just can't care about them.

    MEANWHILE... while New Excalibur was going on, Cornell wrote a miniseries on Pete Wisdom. It was avant-garde and brilliant, well worth picking up. Tinkerbell has grown up to be a snotty goth, there's a skrull who thinks he's John Lennon, and Captain Midlands is the delightful pun on Captain America. Great story. And apparently others thought so as well, since he got to restart Excalibur, under the new title of CB and MI13.

    3 issues thus far, and they are excellent. Captain Britain, the Black Knight (always a favorite of mine), John the Skrull, Spitfire, some new chick who is muslim but not a cliched stereotype like Sand was in the XMen. Thus far, it has been a good read, but 3 issues may be too early to tell. Still, Cornell did great with the Wisdom series, and the list of WHO episodes he wrote are impressive, so we know he's a good writer, even if you hate his politics.

    Now, here's the part you may not like: Issue 3, CB gets a new suit. Me, I like it, and I like how they introduced it, but if you are an oldschool purist, it might bug you. But thus far the series is in my top 3 titles (with Thunderbolts and Guardians of the Galaxy). It has great potential, IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • flutegirlrockz
    replied
    Is that the House Of M one?

    Leave a comment:


  • David Mosley
    replied
    Is this new Captain Britain drawn by Alan Davis? Nope, so it's not the 'real' Captain Britain.

    An explanation: Although I read the original US-originated Captain Britain comic (written by Chris Claremont) in the 1970s, I didn't really get into the character until the mid/late '80s when Jamie Delano and Alan Davis were doing UK-originated material for Captain Britain Monthly, which was after the famous Alan Moore run in the early '80s (again with Davis).* Then I picked up Marvel's Excalibur, which picked up the pieces of Delano's storyline and return Claremont to scripting duties alongside Davis,who was by then widely identified as the definitive CB artist. The last CB material I picked up was Uncanny X-Men #462-5, only the first half of which was drawn by Davis. I've always found other artists' representations of Captain Britain lacking something by comparison with Davis' interpretation, who seems to understand the character better imo.

    You can try selling me on the CB/MI:13 comic if you like, but when I read things by Cornell about the comic like: "I'm quite a fan of Gordon Brown.** I'm pleased we've given him a PR boost on both sides of the Atlantic and around the world. I feel quite sorry for him, so I'm glad I've contributed a bit." I have to say you'll have an uphill battle.

    *Captain Britain appeared as a supporting character in a 'Black Knight' strip that appeared in the 1979-80 UK comic, Hulk Weekly, (predating the Moore/Davis run), which I did read and enjoyed a lot - and wasn't drawn by Davis but the wonderful John Stokes. It's considered a classic strip despite - or maybe because of - never being reprinted outside its original publication.

    **Comics writers shouldn't be giving PR-puffs to politicians in their comic imho.

    Leave a comment:


  • J-Sun
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Coyote View Post
    right now?
    Captain Britain and MI13 #3
    & Moon Knight #20

    How do British folk fill about the Captain Britain?
    Paul Cornell, the writer, is British, and has worked on the Doctor Who TV series, so I assume they can't be too non-plussed with it...

    Leave a comment:


  • David Mosley
    replied
    I discovered in FP Cardiff today there's a new Ambush Bug mini-series out: Ambush Bug: Year None! W00t!! I'm so made up!

    <- That's not the cover I picked up, btw. I seem to have got the variant cover* by AB creator Keith Giffen.

    The wait is over — everyone's favorite Bug is back, courtesy of the original AMBUSH BUG team of Keith Giffen and Robert Loren Fleming! Cities will be destroyed! Cats and dogs will live in sin! Every unanswered question of the DC Universe will be answered! Live heroes will die and dead heroes will live! Okay, none of that actually happens, but join us anyway for this totally irreverent romp through the DC Universe as only Ambush Bug could give you!
    *Variant cover
    Last edited by David Mosley; 07-25-2008, 11:08 AM.

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