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Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

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Reinart der Fuchs
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What are you reading/collecting at the moment?

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  • ThanosShadowsage
    replied
    Deadpool. Tons and tons of Deadpool. Anything I can find.

    If the movie gets canceled I will cry.

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  • Rothgo
    replied
    Well punned LE!

    Leave a comment:


  • L'Etranger
    replied
    Just dug up a comic whose hero is a 1930's pilot called January Jones (!), a great looking blonde who gets into all sorts of trouble. And of course she's giving the Nazis a hard time ...
    By Eric Heuvel and Martin Lodewijk (Texts) from the Netherlands.
    No idea if it ever managed to get translated into English...

    Might add the book was published 1988, so a good deal of time before the actress became known or stopped playing with dolls for that matter.
    Last edited by L'Etranger; 02-04-2011, 09:45 AM.

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  • Pebble
    replied
    Picked up at Dave's comics at Brighton.

    Widowmaker 1
    Madame Xanadu final issue
    Lady Mechinak 1

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  • J-Sun
    replied
    Currently collecting:

    MARVEL:
    Thunderbolts (really well written these days. It is once again THE story to read)
    XMen Legacy (Also consistently well written)
    New Mutants (these 2 X titles are both telling the Age of X storyline. We'll see how this goes. New Mutants has not been as gripping as Legacy)

    DC
    Azrael (Not bad. I think it's finally coming into it's own)
    Freedom Fighters
    JLI - Generation Lost

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom Murphy
    replied
    As a post-script to the chat about Bryan Talbot and the Grandville books - here's where you can buy original art from various of Bryan's projects:

    http://www.bryan-talbot.com/onlineshop/index.php

    Leave a comment:


  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by Pebble View Post
    Finished both the Grandville books yesterday and very enjoyable, but the main culprits were fairly easy to spot and my only tiny-weeny gripe was having Socialist Republics rather than Chartist Republics, which I thought might be more in keeping.
    I read Gv Mon Amour over the weekend as well. In general, I think I agree with the tone Mike took in his review of it in The Guardian: 'Talbot's narratives lack the complexity or originality of Alan Moore's, [but] he brings a rare subtlety, even beauty, to his medium. His drawing is first class and his dialogue superb, adding credibility to his characterisation while moving the story along at a laconic lick.'

    The plot is somewhat if not simplistic then obvious which slightly mars ones enjoyment of it (since there aren't the narrative surprises one might hope for), but the draughtsmanship is indeed first-rate.

    In an anthropomorphic universe, I do find it rather jarring whenever Lebrock eats, say, bacon, particularly when you've just seen a porcine-headed character walking past in the background on a previous page. One of the feline characters also keeps a pet cat as a pet as well. How does this relationship between 'two-legged' and 'four-legged' animals work exactly?


    Overall I would say that if GvMA doesn't quite reach the heights of the first novel it's still worth getting, although at the right price (i.e. £10-ish) rather than the RRP of £17.

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  • Pebble
    replied
    Finished both the Grandville books yesterday and very enjoyable, but the main culprits were fairly easy to spot and my only tiny-weeny gripe was having Socialist Republics rather than Chartist Republics, which I thought might be more in keeping.

    Incidentally reading The Comic Book Heroes (2nd edition) about the start of the silver age of comics and explains about those WW stores and the evolution of Marvel and DC.

    Leave a comment:


  • opaloka
    replied
    I'd never read the earliest issues except for the odd origin reprint and I had a great time with the book, but these were drawn for color and you can tell by looking at them. It's not like Savage Sword of Conan for instance where it was drawn for black and white and looks like it. It's true of the Defenders books I have as well, they can be harder to read in black and white because the images don't make sense as quickly. I'd say I'd wait for the color versions but I'm skeptical we'll ever see any.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pebble
    replied
    I had a near complete run of Warlord (Travis Morgan) including the 1st Special issue series. The only issue I missed was the Atlantis origin issue - which I think was issue 3? Grell was superb on the Legion with Paul Levitz, but I was never keen on Jon Sable. Starslayer was not bad either.

    Currently, enjoying Essential Thor Vol. 1, you can see where there is a shift from one off story episode to longer soap opera style. In comparison, I have been reading Wonder Woman’s early stories in DC showcase B&W series and the difference is staggering.

    The problem with horror is that you expect some much gore these days. Pebble Major and I watched the John Hurt’s version of Whistle and I will come, this Christmas Eve and that was scary even though it was just a door rattling for most of the story with a white figure in the background. It was the Empty Child or Blink all over again as it scared her witless.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris T
    replied
    Originally posted by opaloka View Post
    I've been revisiting some old faves. I got the Scout omnibusses and the Grimjack omnibus, and will probably get the Jon Sable book next. I recently picked up the Warlord (US) book from DC and wonder if/when they'll put out more - and why it's not in color Grell is Great!
    Grell is pretty good. He's got that slightly barmy angle which I dig in a comic.

    I've never read any of those particular Eclipse series although I'll probably get a trade one of these days. I loved Timothy Truman's art in those old RPG books back in the day.

    Yeah I understand those Showcase/Essential "phone books" are great value but unless they're in the original four colour - or close to - I can wait.

    Speaking of Alan Moore, after reading some of the reviews online am I the only one loving the Neonomicon limited series/HP Lovecraft tribute on Avatar?

    A lot of people seemed critical of the second issue which I found suitably horrific. Some of the criticisms went along the lines of 'well you know what's gonna happen next so big deal' which I think is a bit lame. Anytime you pick a horror book or video you know it's not going to end well. I watch Alien last night and, even though I knew almost exactly what was going to happen, for the most of the first half I was wishing they'd not land on that planet, not look in the alien space-ship, not overlook standard quarantine procedures, etc etc... I get a similar effect watching Peep Show.

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  • opaloka
    replied
    I've been revisiting some old faves. I got the Scout omnibusses and the Grimjack omnibus, and will probably get the Jon Sable book next. I recently picked up the Warlord (US) book from DC and wonder if/when they'll put out more - and why it's not in color Grell is Great!
    Last edited by opaloka; 12-28-2010, 06:51 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris T
    replied
    [QUOTE=Pebble;218159]
    Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
    Update

    Thanks, Dave. I found the thread under - Moorcock & 2000AD (Nemesis the Warlock/Hawkmoon)
    Interesting! Thanks for the tip. Yeah Alan Moore is easily the best thing to come out of 2000AD.

    Another comic I've been getting into recently is the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. I've only read the first two but I'm keen to read more.
    Last edited by Chris T; 12-27-2010, 11:57 PM. Reason: removed intraforum link

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  • Pebble
    replied
    Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
    As you bought the first issue of 2000AD then you might have noticed a 'Soviet' subtext to the Volgan army in the 'Invasion!' strip starring Bill Savage. Pat Mills originally called the 'Volgans' Russians and the first strip was drawn accordingly but at some point management decided the bad guys should be fictionalised and had the artwork altered.

    Mike actually had a rather public spat with Pat Mills in the pages of The Guardian at the time of 2000AD's launch over the content of 'Invasion!', which should be documented around here somewhere.
    It all comes back to me now! Mrs T being assassinated, the capturing of the North Sea oil wells, there might have been a nuking of Birmingham as well (or am I getting confused with WW3 paperback book by Hackett). I would say that it is an exception that proves the rule. I was never sure if naming the heir to the throne, Prince John was an ironic joke.

    Pat Mills did have a go at re-dressing the balance with a re-vamp of the whole sequence in the last few years, but I had lost interest at that point with 2000ad. So didn't read much of the series.

    Update

    Thanks, Dave. I found the thread under - Moorcock & 2000AD (Nemesis the Warlock/Hawkmoon)
    Last edited by Pebble; 12-27-2010, 02:41 AM. Reason: Added link.

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  • Rob Hansen
    replied
    Superheroes v Communists

    Oh yeah, in the early 1960s, Marvel comics were rabidly anti-Communist. Because that sort of blatant political propaganda was unacceptable in UK comics - where the propaganda was a little more subtle - when those issues were reprinted over here the titles got altered so that, for example, the early Thor story "Prisoner of the Reds" became "Prisoner in Chains". And Communists became 'Bodavians', Bodavia being this fictional catch-all country to which those particular villains could all be assigned. This made them all just generically evil and opposing the heroes out of basic evilness rather than for any poilitical reason - not that the Communists in Marvel comics seemed to be operating on any principle beyond being evil, mind you.

    Things were even more blatant in the 1950s. Don't believe me? Then scope out this 1950s Captain America cover:

    http://www.comics.org/issue/11555/cover/4/
    Last edited by Rob Hansen; 12-27-2010, 02:21 AM. Reason: typos

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