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  • zlogdan
    replied
    Excellent review! I am going to read the extra text on volumes 1 and 2. I really liked the texts based parts of Watchmen. Moore is a hell of a writer just O'Neill is a superb artist. I think that I will have to read about the background of Black Dossier on the internet though!

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  • Octo Seven
    replied
    Here's my amazon review if you're interested.

    A Book Lover's Dream

    The hardcover edition of this book is simply beautiful. First the presentation: black cover with embossed MI5 insignia with a wrap-around dust-jacket, fabric bookmark attached to the book. Some sections of the book are printed on different types of paper in order to give individual stories their own unique charm and sense of place. The final chapter is in 3D and the book contains a free pair of 3D glasses provided in the jacket.

    Now the content; This one is not for everybody. Even those who read and enjoyed volumes one and two may be a bit put off by the shift in style of the narrative. If, like me, you really enjoyed the short story at the end of League Volume 1 and the Traveller's Almanac at the end of Volume 2; you will love this. It's dense, very text-heavy and extremely varied from chapter to chapter. It opens with a comic, then turns to text, then back to a comic, then more text etc. The artwork is stunningly detailed and varied, possibly Kevin O'Neil's best work to date and that's a big deal. The overall tone has changed quite drastically, even more noticebly than volume 2 did from volume 1. There is a lot of nudity this-time round, also the setting has changed to 1958 so the language and aesthetic have all shifted too. Also, if you didn't bother to read the New Traveller's Almanac at the end of Volume 2 you will probably be highly confused about Allan Quatermaine's appearance and the fact Miss Murray is as youthful and attractive as ever even though the story takes place 70 years after the events of Volume 1.

    All in all I would recommend this book to open-minded fans of Alan Moore and fiction in general. Don't buy this expecting a graphic novel or a Victorian adventure-yarn for boys, this one is more cerebral and requires an enthusiastic reader who can handle a bit of meat with their veggies.

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    Yeah, I was researching the releases of Black Dossier. It seems vol1, vol2, and century 1910 and 1969 were translated. I actually bought the American versions because it was cheaper. But if I were to buy them in Portuguese, I'd miss the Black Dossier...

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  • Pebble
    replied
    Totally agree with Dave.

    You need to have read the Black Dossier first before the 1910, etc. Just read the BD and it made the other more accessible. I have 2009 waiting to read, Evanier's Kirby book and the Chaykin one recommended for birthday reading.

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    I looks like I will have to postpone my possible reading of the century volumes until I read the Black Dossier....

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    In recent weeks/months, Ty Templeton has been ragging on Moore over his attitude to Before Watchmen and Moore's (as Templeton saw it) hypocrisy on using public domain characters in ways their creators never envisaged. Well, that's all changed now...

    Presenting Ty Templeton's Bun Toons:


    Here Templeton explains why Black Dossier is so good:
    The Black Dossier is the unified field theory of fiction. Unlike the first two volumes of LOEG, the Black Dossier is more interested in the world of LOEG than the characters themselves, and the multiple fictional lineages that intertwine in Black Dossier includes, well…the entirety of fiction. It includes a lost Shakespearean play, a Tiajuana Bible from Orwell’s 1984, a Kerouac Beat Novel, plus so, so, so much more. It’s part comics (very entertaining comics) featuring members of our regular cast, and a mind-bogglingly complex set of pastiches interweaving themselves into a narrative that slowly dawns on you as you piece the puzzle together. And finally, it wraps up in a way you absolutely don’t see coming, but it actually “wraps” up in a very satisfying way…a way that seems to include Promethea and hints of the Watchmen as part of the narrative. Plus: The cameos…oh the cameos.

    Unfortunately, none of the three parts of “Century” (including 1910) really make sense unless you’ve read Black Dossier (especially the lengthy story of Jenni Diver which takes up much of 1910) as Century is a direct sequel to the Dossier, far more than it’s a sequel to the first two volumes of LOEG. As much as I enjoyed the first two LOEG stories (and to some extent, the unrelated film), the Black Dossier and Century are a completely different animal, one more focused on the concepts of the human relationship to fiction and imagination.

    It does require a fairly decent familiarity with multiple sources, including, but not limited to British Boy’s Comics, Television of the 50s, American Beat poetry, Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, Ian Fleming, Mesopotamian mythology, Homer’s poetry, Noir Film and the history of animation, just to scratch the surface of a very thick and rich tapestry, but OH BOY is it worth it.
    I suspect the mixed reviews come from people who simply aren’t able to follow what’s going on. This is a Gordian Knot of a story…a story that actually involves the Gordian Knot and Alexander.

    Much like the clockwork mechanism that is behind Watchmen was completely missed by everyone involved in both the film and “Before Watchmen” projects, there is SO much roiling below the surface of Black Dossier that has to be worked at to appreciate.

    This is the work of a creative genius who is not stooping to pander.
    I hope that helps.

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  • Octo Seven
    replied
    Originally posted by zlogdan View Post
    Octo: yeah, I dig Wells, though I have never read the books, I saw many films based on his books. I actually could not avoid reading summaries of the volume II.
    I know that Alan Moore hates fans that consider him a God, so he probably hates me :-) I should consider the Black Dossier in the future. Right now, all my funds are over :-( I know I can count on Wikipedia though! Kevin O'Neill rocks. What an artist. I had read many of works before, for example his Mezozoic age graphic novel, yet at this League he goes wilder! Did you read Anubis Gates by Tim Powers ? One of my all time favorite books, which action goes in the 1800s London, perhaps one the most fascinating fictional fantasy worlds ever conceived.
    By the way, century trilogy was bought from Amazon and it took less than week to get down here in crapland! I am almost done with the Swords of Corum book, which now is a personal favorite, next will come the league!
    Swords of Corum is awesome. Haven't read Anubis Gates! I will eventually. I don't think Alan Moore hates any of his fans :D , well except maybe the ones who bought Before Watchmen lol. You might find some parts of the Century Trilogy a bit confusing without some backstory, mainly regarding who some of the new characters are, but I'm sure google or myself can fill you in.

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    Octo: yeah, I dig Wells, though I have never read the books, I saw many films based on his books. I actually could not avoid reading summaries of the volume II.
    I know that Alan Moore hates fans that consider him a God, so he probably hates me :-) I should consider the Black Dossier in the future. Right now, all my funds are over :-( I know I can count on Wikipedia though! Kevin O'Neill rocks. What an artist. I had read many of works before, for example his Mezozoic age graphic novel, yet at this League he goes wilder! Did you read Anubis Gates by Tim Powers ? One of my all time favorite books, which action goes in the 1800s London, perhaps one the most fascinating fictional fantasy worlds ever conceived.
    By the way, century trilogy was bought from Amazon and it took less than week to get down here in crapland! I am almost done with the Swords of Corum book, which now is a personal favorite, next will come the league!
    Last edited by zlogdan; 07-17-2012, 01:43 PM.

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  • Octo Seven
    replied
    Not sure if you're a fan of HG Wells, if you are, you're really in for a treat in volume two! Well either way, you're in for a treat. :D .

    A word of warning, you probably should read the Black Dossier before moving on to the 'League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Century' trilogy. I'd also advise trying to get the hardcover if you can, it's probably near the same price as the paperback and it's a really really REALLY beautiful book, it's nicer than the Absolute Edition too, DC messed that up big-time.
    Last edited by Octo Seven; 07-17-2012, 12:49 PM.

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    I ordered the whole League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen paperbacks ( except the Black Dossier ). I already put my hands at volume 1 and 2, I am almost done with the spectacular volume one of series. Definitely one of the best things ever written. Moore rocks.

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  • Octo Seven
    replied
    Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
    Originally posted by Octo Seven View Post
    Has anybody been reading Bat Woman? I am tempted to by the first trade, simply because JH Williams is the artist, if the script was good too it would definitely be an incentive for me to buy it.
    I'd say Batwoman is definitely worth trying; it's a different sort of Bat-comic to the usual Bat-titles having a more supernatural tone (some readers have suggestion that Kate Kane wouldn't be out of place in Justice League Dark) than the sort of things Batman deals with. JHW3's art is a significant factor for many people and possibly over-shadows the character (i.e. if JHW3 quit a lot of people might/would drop the book); Amy Reeder was slated to draw alternate storylines with JHW3 but she was dropped/quit after two (three?) issues; I haven't seen her replacement (Trevor McCarthy)'s stuff yet.
    Thanks for the info. Upgrading my Promethea to Absolute editions, going to buy Book 2 today and will probably pick up the first Batwoman trade while I'm there!

    Leave a comment:


  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by Octo Seven View Post
    Has anybody been reading Bat Woman? I am tempted to by the first trade, simply because JH Williams is the artist, if the script was good too it would definitely be an incentive for me to buy it.
    I'd say Batwoman is definitely worth trying; it's a different sort of Bat-comic to the usual Bat-titles having a more supernatural tone (some readers have suggestion that Kate Kane wouldn't be out of place in Justice League Dark) than the sort of things Batman deals with. JHW3's art is a significant factor for many people and possibly over-shadows the character (i.e. if JHW3 quit a lot of people might/would drop the book); Amy Reeder was slated to draw alternate storylines with JHW3 but she was dropped/quit after two (three?) issues; I haven't seen her replacement (Trevor McCarthy)'s stuff yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • WhiteWolf359
    replied
    Still catching up on new Lady Death series. Fell behind at Issue 10.

    Leave a comment:


  • Octo Seven
    replied
    Has anybody been reading Bat Woman? I am tempted to by the first trade, simply because JH Williams is the artist, if the script was good too it would definitely be an incentive for me to buy it.

    Leave a comment:


  • J-Sun
    replied
    Justice League International is ending. Good riddance.
    Still thinking of dropping Green Lantern New Guardians.
    Interested in seeing if JLDark goes anywhere. It's okay, but I'm still waiting for it to find it's legs.
    Aquaman is of course well written, but again, it feels like it's floundering. (Yeah, I know. bad pun.)

    Just put myself down for the new Marvel comics of Ms. Marvel, Hawkeye, and Gambit. Here's hoping.

    Leave a comment:

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