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Some advice and help on comics and how to make them.

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  • Some advice and help on comics and how to make them.

    I would like to make a comic . How do you get into this field? I would write and draw. Can someone tell me the way comics are drawn made etc? Do they have lots of people working in the same style as the originals?

  • #2
    Hi Yolanda. There are quite a few books available that will tell what you want to know. This looks like a good one to start with:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1592572332/

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    • #3
      Just do it. I make absolutely zero money off of it, nobody really reads it, but I have a lot of fun with my webcomic, Greenbriar. I admit, that there is something lost without the tactile feel of paper, but it's still fun to make. I'm responsible for every aspect of it, from drawing to color. Everything, for good or ill.

      http://greenbriarcomics.com

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      • #4
        Re: Some advice and help on comics and how to make them.

        Originally posted by yolanda
        I would like to make a comic . How do you get into this field? I would write and draw. Can someone tell me the way comics are drawn made etc? Do they have lots of people working in the same style as the originals?
        What sort of comics do you like at the moment, Yolanda? Mainstream? Independent? Small Press? What genre(s) would you like to work with? Superheroes? horror? SF? Fantasy? WHich artists and/or writers do you like to read?

        Do you want to 'break into' comics (ie work for the big comics publishers) or just produce something for yourself?

        Where are you based? USA? UK? Elsewhere?

        All the above will kind of determine how you approach this.

        Perhaps it would be useful to check out the submissions details of a few publishers, just to know what they look for, regardless of whether you intend to submit anything.

        US
        - http://www.dccomics.com/about/submissions.html
        - http://www.dccomics.com/about/submis...sub_didio.html
        - http://www.marvel.com/company/subs.htm
        - http://www.marvel.com/company/pdfs/i...ssion_form.pdf
        - http://www.darkhorse.com/company/newrecruits.php
        - http://www.imagecomics.com/submissions.php

        UK
        - http://www.2000adonline.com/?zone=su...s&page=artists
        - http://www.2000adonline.com/?zone=su...s&page=writers

        This next link will allow you to view some comics scripts, which will help you to understand how to 'layout' a script - although you will need to register with the site in order to view them:
        http://www.2000adonline.com/?zone=su...age=scripttest

        Some recommended reading:
        Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics
        Will Eisner's Comics & Sequential Art

        See how you get on with that for the time being. DeeCrowSeer does his own comix, so might be worth getting in touch with him here as well.
        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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        • #5
          Re: Some advice and help on comics and how to make them.

          Originally posted by demos99
          See how you get on with that for the time being. DeeCrowSeer does his own comix, so might be worth getting in touch with him here as well.
          Er... not really. :oops: I mean I do draw my own, but they've never been published, and I'm just going on what I've read in Understanding Comics, and Underground Comix. Some day I may finish reading my copy of How To Draw Comics The Marvel Way (it's only taken me thirteen years to get to chapter four!) but at this point I don't have the faintest clue how to lay-out a page. So, I'm no guru, that's for sure. It is fun though, in a time-consuming and frustrating sort of way. :)
          "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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          • #6
            The two bibles of Comic Book art; Understanding Comics and How To Draw Comics the Marvel Way. It's seems we have a lot in common DeeCrowSeer. I've been working my way through HTDCtMW for years as well.
            ..he weeps with the wonder of suddenly recollected innocence, of something he believed lost as everything else is lost to him and which makes him believe, if only for this moment, that what he has lost might be, perhaps, restored.

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            • #7
              For some reason I assumed when I bought the Marvel book that all I'd have to do was read it, and I'd be embued with magical drawing skills! It was quite a let down to discover I had to actually practice as well. :(
              "That which does not kill us, makes us stranger." - Trevor Goodchild

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              • #8
                The HTDCTMW book is fine - if you want to draw like John Buscema, that is. :)
                _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would recommend Burne Hogarth's Dynamic Figure Drawing. When I went to art school, my figure drawing was far better than most of my classmates, and I credit studying Burne Hogarth with that.

                  Another book I really like, when it comes to comic book art, is a British book called, Figure Drawing Without a Model

                  Scott McCloud's first book is good, but do yourself a favor and buy Wil Eisner's books as well.

                  Don't just read "how-to" books by comic pros. Learn how to really draw, or really write for that matter.

                  Study art history. Yes, Mike Mignola is a genius when it comes to light and dark, but so was Caravaggio, and you need to know that. If you are interested in horror comics, you should be as familiar with Goya as you are with Berni Wrightson.

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