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What book are you reading at the moment? Part 2

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  • Finished Warlord of the Air (which I started some months back), moving on to The Land Leviathan. First class Moorcockian political commentary!!!
    Kevin McCabe
    The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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    • Wish i was reading the Bastable books for the first time Kevin,they are amongst Mikes best.
      Think i will re-read them next.
      "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

      Hunter S Thompson

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      • I really, really like the Bastable books. I think Warlord is probably the best of the three, but all three remain surprisingly relevant in their observations.

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        • Finished with Napolean Bonaparte

          War and Peace was every bit as good as I had hoped. Now what? I've finished There are Doors by Gene Wolfe, and am still trying to understand it.

          On the non-fiction front I am getting stuck into On the Road with Bob Dylan by Larry "Ratso" Sloman, who is also a character in Kinky Friedman's novels ... if it was anyone else, written by anyone else, I would say that with sympathy ...

          I'm working on learning Sanskrit so I can get reading Kalidasa; I should try - again - to get myself some books teaching Pali, Tibetan and Prakrit so I can study up a bit more on Jain and Buddhism ... my Enclave stories seem to require it.
          sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

          Gold is the power of a man with a man
          And incense the power of man with God
          But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
          And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

          Nativity,
          by Peter Cape

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          • It's looking like the next book I read might be The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, if I have the title right. I didn't pick it; I won it in a raffle. I'm glad I didn't win the tremendous stack as I didn't even get a bag to carry it in. I probably mentioned it before, but I've been going through the second Corum Trilogy, some Lukyanenko, and Jasper Fforde at an incredibly slow pace.
            Thick as wind-blown leaves innumerable, since 1985

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            • i just finished Mother London by himself. very enjoyable read, even if i am unfamiliar with the london landscape.

              also just finished The Night Listener by Armistead Maupin, which was enjoyable enough if a bit silly and whiney.
              Currently reading:

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              • I've recently finished Breakfast In The Ruins, The Entropy Tango and Legends From The Edge Of Time.
                I'm now midway into A Messiah At The End Of Time.
                Why are so many of the multiversal characters lives ritually sacrificed ??
                I was looking forward to getting a glimpse of Armatuce when...
                "Then she felt her bones tearing through her flesh, her organs rupturing, and she gave herself up in peace, to the pain."
                Dafnish seemed like a pretty cool chick with a commanding, shrewish aura.
                Seems like a waste.

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                • Finished The Land Leviathan. I think it took mainstream novels and screenplays another 25 years to come up with this take on race (and, when they did, they didn't do it nearly as well). Began The Steel Tsar.
                  Kevin McCabe
                  The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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                  • Originally posted by Kevin McCabe View Post
                    Began The Steel Tsar.
                    Original or revised?
                    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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                    • My guess would be revised. It's in the Omnibus published by Whitewolf. I actually got it a long time back and read a good part of Warlord of the Air back then. I have some time off and am finishing off a lot of stuff (very fun!). Sometimes, I've found I've read the whole thing - but a hair to fast.
                      Kevin McCabe
                      The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

                      Comment


                      • I too love the Bastable trilogy.
                        I found S. O'bean to be one of the unsung hero's in The Land Leviathan.
                        How can I tell if my Steel Tzar editions are revised or original David?
                        I have one that is a Daw 1982 and the other in The Nomad Of Time hardcover trilogy which is undated.
                        The Steel Tzar is an experiment in decadence.

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                        • Mike revised TST for the Orion 1993 omnibus of A Nomad of the Time Streams, so all versions prior to that will be the original version. Of all the revisions that Mike made to the Orion/WW omnibuses, the ones for TST were the most extension with more than a third (perhaps half?) of the original novel being entirely rewritten. The original TST was written while Mike's marriage to Jill Riches was breaking up, and Mike has expressed his dissatisfaction with the original novel, as he mentions in these comments:
                          "I should never have written it. I rewrote it extensively for the omnibus -- the only one I did rewrite. I think I improved it, but I'd need other opinions before I was sure! The book was such a disappointment to Don Wollheim, the original publisher, that he said it wasn't worth the advance we'd agreed. I said he was quite right and why didn't we settle for half ? Done, he said, and the book came out. Don could never resist a deal.[1]

                          "I wrote Tsar...back to back with The Great Rock and Roll Swindle, which I think was the more successful. Both were done in days to deadlines in unsettling conditions. But even then I feel I should probably have stopped at the second volume, with its emphasis on racism, as the first had emphasised imperialism, its constant twin. But the publishers had all begged me for a third volume at a time when I was financially and somewhat morally weak... As I said, I did my best to improve it in the rewrite, but I probably should have suppressed it. Then everyone would have wondered what nation had the power to keep me quiet..."[2]

                          "I was never satisfied with the original version of The Steel Tsar. I felt it fell down on structure. When I wrote it I was in the process of splitting up with a lady who was a little uncertain about whether she wanted to split up or not and alternated between trying to kill herself and trying to kill me! I associate writing that book (and the Sex Pistols book which I did at the same time) more with hands holding carving knives than airships... :) When I had the chance to revise it for the omnibus I added a fair amount of new material. I like it better now! Wrote the new material in summer, in a lovely, calm garden... The American editor who bought the book, incidentally, didn't like my take on Stalin. He was probably the last unregenerate Stalinist in NY!"[3]
                          M. Zenith and Beggs/Beks now appear in the revised version.
                          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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                          • Thanks Dave, that means I have both versions to use as comparisons.
                            Was there ever any other delving into the Armatuce legend that you can recall?

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                            • Not to my certain knowledge - just the one Legend ('Ancient Shadows') afaik - but Dafnish Armatuce is mentioned in The Transformation of Miss Mavis Ming (aka A Messiah at the End of Time aka Constant Fire) and The Condition of Muzak (as attending the Reunion Party).
                              _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                              _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                              _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                              _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                              Comment


                              • Just got it today so im starting Docs recommendation Demon Theory by Stephen Graham Jones.
                                "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                                Hunter S Thompson

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