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What book are you reading at the moment? Part 2

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  • #61
    Some good stuff there guys.
    I've just finished my epic Covenanting and was pretty much blown away.
    Cant wait for the next one.
    Its going to be a hard act to follow but im re-acquainting myself with Don De Lillo's Underworld which i had to put down a couple of weeks back.
    "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

    Hunter S Thompson

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    • #62
      I spent the weekend re-reading Alan Moore & J. Williams III's Promethea after having recommended it for the 'Must Read Fantasy' thread. It is one of the most comic-y comics of, well, pretty much ever, in that Moore & Williams really set themselves no boundaries of what was and wasn't possible. The Mِbius Strip double-pager is just one example in Promethea of what comics can do that other mediums can't. It's also got some interesting insights into the nature of Magic, Myth and Art as well.
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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      • #63
        Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
        I spent the weekend re-reading Alan Moore & J. Williams III's Promethea after having recommended it for the 'Must Read Fantasy' thread. It is one of the most comic-y comics of, well, pretty much ever, in that Moore & Williams really set themselves no boundaries of what was and wasn't possible. The Mِbius Strip double-pager is just one example in Promethea of what comics can do that other mediums can't. It's also got some interesting insights into the nature of Magic, Myth and Art as well.
        I struggled with interest issues: it struck me as esssentially a rather long-winded lecture: nothing to say that comics can't be used as such, but not really what I wanted.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by Rothgo View Post
          I struggled with interest issues: it struck me as esssentially a rather long-winded lecture: nothing to say that comics can't be used as such, but not really what I wanted.
          That's a fair point as there's a lot of 'talking heads' stuff in Promethea but then I like talking heads stuff (i.e. The Council of Elrond in LOTR). The 'lectures' on magic were the sort of 'decontructionism' that pushes my buttons and Promethea's 'road trip' along the Kabbalah had echoes of both Rackhir's journey in 'To Rescue Tanelorn...' and the Doctor Who adventure 'The Keys of Marinus', so almost more than Moore's scripts I particularly enjoyed Williams' artwork. Too many comics these days look the same - only because the tights and cape change can you tell them apart - but with Promethea almost no two issues looked the same. Some of the page layouts are counter-intuitive - there's a double page layout in the 'Gold' issue where I'm still not sure how you're supposed to read it, i.e clockwise, anti-clockwise, up/down, left to right, some combination of all four? - but that means the reader's brain is slightly more engaged in decoding Promethea than in standard left to right, up-down traditional comics.

          One qualm I did have with the comic was the change in Williams' physical depiction of Stacia from the early issues to the mid-series ones where she becomes the second Promethea, not to mention her character's move from homophobe to full-blown lesbian. I guess people do change that radically in real life but it was a little 'woah, what's going on here?'. I guess power will have that affect on some people though.

          I also wonder how many people ever read the final (32nd) issue.
          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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          • #65
            "The Lost World" by A C Doyle. Kind of a guilty pleasure. I'm sure it's all done tongue in cheek, but Challenger is so over the top he might as well be orbiting the planet... and with a name like Challenger: that's rather apposite.

            Also starting to read "1491", and not sure if it is baloney or not. Basically evil thugs came from Spain to destroy a perfectly well-balanced and evolving series of cultures. The ignoble savage was from Europe, essentially.

            Des
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            • #66
              I am currently reading Grendel by John Gardener.

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              • #67
                Grendel is marvellous. I love the chapter when he talks to the materialist dragon - sounds naff,I know, but it's great stuff really.

                The Lost World was the first paperback non-children's book I ever bought (John Murray edition, priced pre-decimal, still have it). Challenger is a joy !

                Currently reading some Jeff Vandemeer. Not blowing me away thus far, but there's still time.

                Also working my way through the three premiere hardcover editions of The Death of Captain America by Brubaker - I've read some of these issues, but not all. Best Marvel Comics for decades, IMHO.

                Lots of research reading for 100 Must Read Fantasy Novels going on currently too.Otherwise, too busy writing - looking forward to finishing the book and having more time to read strictly for pleasure.
                2006: 100 Must Read Science Fiction Novels (5th printing 2009/Bulgarian Edition (!) due 2011).

                2008: 100 Must Read Books For Men (2nd printing 2008)

                2009: 100 Must Read Fantasy Novels

                sigpic

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by UncleDes View Post
                  "The Lost World" by A C Doyle. Kind of a guilty pleasure. I'm sure it's all done tongue in cheek, but Challenger is so over the top he might as well be orbiting the planet... and with a name like Challenger: that's rather apposite.
                  I read the collected Challenger stories not long back, Des. 'The Lost World' is definitely the best one. The one about spritualism is painful to read all these years later, especially the volte-face by the Prof.
                  You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

                  -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

                  Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

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                  "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

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                  • #69
                    I've only read the first couple pages so far, but I'm very excited to be starting the brand new C.J. Cherryh novel Regenesis, the sequel to Cyteen that's taken two decades to materialize!
                    My Facebook; My Band; My Radio Show; My Flickr Page; Science Fiction Message Board

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                    • #70
                      Prince Andrew has died

                      And the Antichrist (Napolean) is stuck in a badly-burned Moscow while the coutry-side seethes. Count Bezukhov is now a guest of said Antichrist's Armed Forces, and is about to go on a tour of Southern Russia.

                      In other news, I've just borrowed Gene Wolfe's "There are Doors" - one of the few books that I consider the ultimate in modern fantastic literature. He makes the likes of C.S. Lewis look like a rank amateur.
                      sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

                      Gold is the power of a man with a man
                      And incense the power of man with God
                      But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
                      And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

                      Nativity,
                      by Peter Cape

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                      • #71
                        Finished the Lanier (got to find the next one!) and moved on to 'She' by Haggard.
                        You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

                        -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

                        Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

                        :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


                        "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Governor of Rowe Island View Post
                          I read the collected Challenger stories not long back, Des. 'The Lost World' is definitely the best one. The one about spritualism is painful to read all these years later, especially the volte-face by the Prof.
                          True, but The Poison Belt and When the World Screamed are still very fine imho.

                          I'm currently reading The Count of Monte Cristo; partly because D-A rated it when he read it last year. I'm enjoying it immensely.

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                          • #73
                            Currently reading David Mitchel's Cloud Atlas and enjoying it very much. I've even managed to ignore the fact that Richard and Judy (allegedly) liked it.

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                            • #74
                              Just finished Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns. Brilliant. Utterly brilliant.
                              I don't know anything about music. In my line you don't have to. Elvis Presley

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                              • #75
                                I just started Julia and the Bazooka by Anna Kavan.
                                It looks like it may be yet another unputdownable one of the great womans books.
                                "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                                Hunter S Thompson

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