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What book are you reading at the moment? Part 2

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  • Don't feel too bad Kevin because I'm kind of there with you. At one time I was far ranging in my reading covering all subjects tho sf and fantasy were large components in my choices. As I've grown older I find I've grown more catholic in my tastes. I very rarely read non fiction any more outside of newspapers and even my reading of those has diminished since my stroke. (Reading a newspaper one handed can be a beyotch tho as my arm has come back I am reading them more but still not back to my 3 papers a day). Even my fiction reading has become more limited. The authors I am familiar with are slowly leaving this plane of existance and I become fearful of trying new ones because so much of what I find is tripe. By this I don't mean that the subject matter is low brow, have no problems with that, but that the writing itself is aimed at a generation requiring instant gratification and has the attention span of a mayfly, after reproducing at that. Becoming old, crotchety and set in my ways I guess. At least I can go through these threads and find some suggestions.

    herb
    herb

    Man spends his time on devising a more idiot proof computer. The universe spends its time devising bigger idiots. So far the universe is winning.

    http://www.wolfshead.net/wolfshowl


    http://www.wolfshead.net/books

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    • Dang, I'm sorry to hear that its that tough for you to read Herb. I'm just whining because I'm loaded at work and can't read as much as I would like. The Martin stuff is fun and I can pick it up and set it down. But, it's getting pretty bad when the only thing I can post to the culture thread is a comparison of the two Twilight films (first director was way edgier). I did order a EU History that JohnEffay recommended. New edition issues on 12/14 and should be here in a week. On the newspaper front, would it help to read them online?
      Kevin McCabe
      The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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      • Yeah I have to confess that I haven't read any Dumas yet either. Apparently The Three Musketeers is part of a series? Where does it begin?

        I recently read Mythago Wood. I read the thread here before and saw it at a local bookshop in a very nice new edition. Good stuff!

        After that I read Stars in my Pocket like Grains of Sand. That was great. I've had the paperback since I was a kid (it had a cool gun on the cover and flying aliens) and couldn't get past the 90 page first chapter. Just as well because I very much doubt I would have appreciated it then!

        Right now I'm reading that Worlds of Exile and Illusion, the Tor collection of le Guin's first three novels. No opinion as yet on those.

        Kevin, yeah those Fire & Ice novels are certainly addictive. I read the whole series very quickly last summer. They helped me get through a long period of under/unemployment which I'm just coming out of.

        Herb, that's too bad. I reckon Will Self's more recent stuff is fairly good (I'm not keen on his earlier stuff though). But yeah, I'm still coming back to the classics (inc. SF &F) - there's just so much to catch up on!
        EDIT: Pynchon's still tearing out some rippers. The new one Inherent Vice is up next after I finally get paid..

        Re newspapers: I stopped buying them since the beginning of the Iraq War. Made me too angry - it's all a load of crap. I just read them online now.
        Last edited by Chris T; 12-16-2009, 03:52 AM. Reason: how could i forget the new Pynchon

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        • Originally posted by Kevin McCabe View Post
          All right fellows. I feeling a little inferior here. I'll admit it, I've read the Musketeers, but not Monte Cristo. I've been meaning to get around to Jung ever since I got here and heard Mike talk about archetypes. And, I've tried locate Ackroyd locally, but its a slim and expensive selection. (It's like that with all the London authors. I haven't found Scarlet Tracings for less than fifty bucks). Plus, the truth is I'm just plain addicted. Finished Game of Thrones last night and hit the bookstore at 9:00 (late night at work) and got A Clash of Kings. So, I'm not going to be measuring up for quite some time.
          I have a second hand copy of The House of Dr John Dee - (I think) some where, which you can have, if I can find it. Some where in the garage library waiting to go to a charity shop or stall. Although, the postage might be prohibited, message me direct.

          I found Dumas took a couple of go's at stuttered on the Three Musketeers (missed the films), but started a PBM of En Garde. Where I made it to Cardinal, just before the first Civil War and the Dowager Queen became my mistress .

          However, as back ground reading, I picked it up again and found it more exciting after they return from London (where most of the films stop). I think Twenty Years Afterwards, Louise De Vallere (?) Porthos. Great fun, still have Magaruite De Valois to read, which I think La Reine Margot (film) was based upon.

          I loved the Count of Monte Cristo, once you get pass the Chateau D'If, it really gets going. Also HIGHLY recommended is the film, Les Enfants Du Paradis.

          This is the french equivalent of Citizen Kane. I have written elsewhere about it, but get hold of a copy in which way you can, turn off all phones etc and just watch it. It uses mime vs theatrical with love, plus some Commedia D'Arte. Superb!

          Dig the filme out for Christmas again, me thinks.
          Papa was a Rolling Stone......

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          • KM, you ain't missing out on too much. I'm still slogging through that damn Jung book, and its only about 175 pp.. A mind bender.

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            • Finished with the Mievilleian activities(which were thoroughly enjoyed!)
              Am now away to start-

              Graham Greene-Stamboul Train,Orient Express.
              "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

              Hunter S Thompson

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              • The Day Of Creation - J G Ballard

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                • Finally got round to re-reading Alan Garner's 'The Weirdstone of Brisingamen' and I have the sequel tuck away to read. Intriguing, a character called Grimnir that is a little like Gaynor the Damned.

                  Listened to the Radio 4 programme earlier this year about Alan Garner and Alderney Edge. i hope to visit the place some time to view the landscape and not footballers and their ilk. Think Alan Garner could be an under rated author, waiting to be re-discovered.
                  Papa was a Rolling Stone......

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                  • Finished the Synchronicity book on a flight between La Guardia and O'Hare, where I'm sitting now, avoiding all books at the moment. As I understand the expression of the Isles: Cor!

                    I don't disagree with what I understand of the principle, but man alive, the breadth and depth of the concept is something else.

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                    • Originally posted by Pebble View Post
                      Finally got round to re-reading Alan Garner's 'The Weirdstone of Brisingamen'
                      Ah, Pebble. The book that started it all for me. My school teacher when I was 10, a wonderful bloke called Gerry Wright, read it to the class Jackanory style. He had us all entranced.

                      He also recommended The Hitchhikers Guide which had just been broadcast for the first time on Radio 4. My imagination has never been the same since.

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                      • Originally posted by Rothgo View Post
                        The man is a star tf: quality multi-temporal narrative with real point behind it. Plus some darn good bits of historical (English) work. I've bought more than I've read 'cos the positives vibes from those I have: oh for the time!
                        Bit slow here, but "Hawksmoor" is the dog's bollocks, and "First light" is superb.

                        His "London: a Biography" is interesting, but lacks coherence - lots of tit-bits jammed together.

                        Des
                        Spacerockmanifesto on Facebook

                        Hawkwind tabs

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                        • The Fall of the Towers by Samuel R. Delany
                          My Facebook; My Band; My Radio Show; My Flickr Page; Science Fiction Message Board

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                          • Fantastic Victoriana by Jess Nevins. Long term project, this one. Thanks to Berry for getting me interested.
                            Kevin McCabe
                            The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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                            • Never read any Nevins Kevin.
                              Tell us what you think.
                              Im away to start Emphyrio by my other favourite banjo playing author Jack Vance.
                              "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                              Hunter S Thompson

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                              • It's an encyclopedia of popular literature (penny dreadfulls, bloods, novels, all sorts of stuff) from the Victorian times, TF. Mike wrote the intro, Berry mentioned it in a thread. It's very, very, well researched (and really long). It's also really expensive - 327 pounds at amazon.uk. But, my library had it.
                                Kevin McCabe
                                The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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