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What book are you reading at the moment? Part 2

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  • Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
    It's a beautiful spring Wednesday afternoon. I'm going to grab my copy of the Hollow Lands, then head off for a couple of beers and a read, in the country.
    Spring, Dancers, beer. What a great combination!

    I'm (still) reading a collection of Howard Waldrop short stories, Things Will Never Be the Same: A Howard Waldrop Reader. Less exciting to most might be Modern Sociological Theory, by George Ritzer, an overview of work written mostly between 1930 and 1980.

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    • Originally posted by Kevin McCabe View Post
      I've read a book about that period, DA. It was a pretty good tome entitled Our Band Could Be Your Life. For myself, I'm finishing off Fabulous Harbors tonight.
      Yeah, I read that one too. Some serious inaccuracies to be found in it though, like calling the pride of Tacoma Girl Trouble and "Olympia Band"! I was there for enough of the stuff contained in that book to know when he was pretending to know more than he really did. Still a good read though.
      My Facebook; My Band; My Radio Show; My Flickr Page; Science Fiction Message Board

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      • Hey Pietro, synchronicity! I too am currently rereading The Hollow Lands.

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        • But does your re-read also involve beer and a trip to the country? If those were required elements, I can guess what would be the winner of the next Moorcock cup.

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          • I don't have to make a trip to the country: I live there. Usually it's pretty cool, although it wasn't so much fun this morning when the peacocks in the wood we live next to started squawking at 5:45.

            As for beer: most things I do involve it at some point...

            Still reading The Hollow Lands, but today I will be mostly reading Frege on formal logic. I'll need a good dose of Mike in the evening to cheer me up!

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            • Originally posted by johneffay View Post
              Still reading The Hollow Lands, but today I will be mostly reading Frege on formal logic. I'll need a good dose of Mike in the evening to cheer me up!
              Perhaps this should be a question for a new thread:

              Do you find that fiction helps you unplug after reading academic work?

              Some of my students have asked me through the years how I read for pleasure after I read so much for my academic life. I suppose some of them cannot understand that they are remarkably different pursuits, since fewer and fewer of them read for pleasure. Regardless, I find that I sometimes need the catharsis of reading fiction after academic heavy lifting.

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              • Originally posted by johneffay View Post

                As for beer: most things I do involve it at some point...
                Mmmm funny you should say that.......
                "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                Hunter S Thompson

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                • Originally posted by Doc View Post
                  Originally posted by johneffay View Post
                  Still reading The Hollow Lands, but today I will be mostly reading Frege on formal logic. I'll need a good dose of Mike in the evening to cheer me up!
                  Perhaps this should be a question for a new thread:

                  Do you find that fiction helps you unplug after reading academic work?

                  Some of my students have asked me through the years how I read for pleasure after I read so much for my academic life. I suppose some of them cannot understand that they are remarkably different pursuits, since fewer and fewer of them read for pleasure. Regardless, I find that I sometimes need the catharsis of reading fiction after academic heavy lifting.
                  I don't read academic work but I do read a lot of non-fiction, mostly histories or accounts of this and that. I find I need a break every now and then, and fiction supplies that.
                  You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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                  • Originally posted by Doc View Post
                    Some of my students have asked me through the years how I read for pleasure after I read so much for my academic life.
                    The majority of the material I read for my academic life gives me as much pleasure as reading fiction. However, I do find that I read different stuff at different times of day. I like to read in bed: at night it could only be fiction, but first thing in the morning I reach for my notebook and something complicated. Of course, this might just be an excuse for not getting up by making out that I am doing something useful...

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                    • Finished Fabulous Harbors, starting War Among The Angels.
                      Kevin McCabe
                      The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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                      • Soldier, Ask Not by Gordon R. Dickson and Viriconium by M. John Harrison

                        Michael John Harrison . . .Michael John Moorock

                        Two great authors with the same names . . .

                        Coincidence . . . . . .mmmmm, probably . . .
                        Madness is always the best armor against Reality

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                        • You never see them in the same room together do you?
                          _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                          _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                          _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                          _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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                          • I'm in the middle of rereading The Black Corridor. In a weird way, Ryan's loneliness really hits home.
                            "The world is such-and-such or so-and-so only because we tell ourselves that that is the way it is. If we stop telling ourselves that the world is so-and-so, the world will stop being so-and-so." - don Juan

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                            • Brilliant book the Black Corridor is Serpnta,i know what you mean.
                              Im away to start The Time of the Eye by Harlan Ellison.
                              "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                              Hunter S Thompson

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                              • [QUOTE=Doc;157749]
                                Originally posted by johneffay View Post
                                Perhaps this should be a question for a new thread:

                                Do you find that fiction helps you unplug after reading academic work?
                                It certainly takes me well away from my workaholic life.

                                Des
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