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Religion and Science Fiction Reading List

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  • EverKing
    replied
    Originally posted by zlogdan View Post
    Dune: I read the first book and loved it. Parts 2 and 3 were good but I didn't like it at all.
    I know Mike has said he never liked Dune or what Herbert was working toward with the novel/series, but it has been and remains one of my personal favorites. What I like about its take on religion is how it shows the danger of blind faith, how it can be manipulated, and the destructive tendencies in cults of personality.

    Incidentally, the first trailer for Denis Villeneuve's DUNE (2020) just dropped a few hours ago. It makes me cautiously optimistic that we may finally get a worthy film adaptation.

    Leave a comment:


  • zlogdan
    replied
    Childhood's end by Clarke

    My review on Goodreads
    I have just watched the SyFy miniseries which has inevitably made me remember the book that I read when I was 13 and it was, back then, the very first science fiction book I ever read so I cannot deny that reading it made me what I am today and that it had introduced me to the science fiction world.

    Albeit mesmerized by the book as a kid, I today see it as a very flawed, bleak, and disgusting book that merely served to please the fantasies of Arthur Clarke and his objections towards religion. It is a simple book permeated by a so-called "mature, wise" rational view. Now that I am old enough I can understand which were the aims of Clarke: a simple philosophical treat into rationalism with mild condemnation of parents ( something Clarke never was ) for caring for their children.

    In the end, the overlords are mere "Silver surfers" and the being that feeds on earth energy, which is "Galactus". Very deep right?

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    Dune: I read the first book and loved it. Parts 2 and 3 were good but I didn't like the 4th book at all.

    Lord Of Light: I love this book.

    My previously referenced Gene Wolfe's Solar Cycle is my favorite. It is my all-time 12 books saga.😀
    Last edited by zlogdan; 09-09-2020, 09:30 AM.

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    Originally posted by Rothgo View Post
    I vaguely remember Alastair Reynolds being stridently anti-Christian. Phillip Pullman too. Whether you like that vibe is up to you!
    Maybe that is why I liked the film a lot. It has been said that the Golden Compass film had the anti-Christianism watered down or moved out completely. But anyway, I tried to read the book but I did not continue because I liked the film so much.

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  • J-Sun
    replied
    Yeah...
    Children and God Emperor were the two I didn’t care for. All I can figure is that I really dislike the character of Leto 2.

    ive got all the Brian Herbert books but I’ve not read very many yet. been too busy reading other things.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sir Sorcerer
    replied
    I read the Dune volumes 2-6 some time ago, they were really fantastic and mind-blowing. For many years I was satisfied reading the first one over and over, but in the end curiosity got the better of me and I had to get the whole story. Number 4 in particular, God Emperor of Dune, was just perfect in a crazy kind of way, and totally unexpected. I know I am probably in the minority here but to me it's the best in the whole series :)

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  • Kymba334
    replied
    Originally posted by zlogdan View Post
    Do Gene Wolfe's Solar Cycle count?
    Yes, the case for this could be made Zlogdan.

    The epic saga of Severian the Torturer for all its digressions (other tales embedded within the main narrative) follows the familiar structure of basic myth making; a hero's journey that finds a climactic reveal in the protagonist achieving the status and role of a Messiah

    Of course, the same claim could at a stretch be given to Frank Herbert's Dune Saga with the only real difference lying in that a flawed Messiah is the father of a vastly more powerful successor; non-human and seemingly immortal.

    (My apologies for the spoilers but i can't seem to find any masking tags in the toolbar!)
    Last edited by Kymba334; 09-08-2020, 01:00 PM.

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  • zlogdan
    replied
    Do Gene Wolfe's Solar Cycle count?

    Leave a comment:


  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    Then there's poet, author & WWI veteran, Robert Graves' only (as far as I know), venture into SF: Seven Days in New Crete. It's a sort of extrapolation of Graves' highly speculative & weirdly plausible, The White Goddess. Just what might an alternative, Goddess worshipping, matriarchal, anarchist utopia look like?

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
    Didn't have to search far for this precise title of this article...

    Is Philip Pullman the anti-C.S.Lewis? | America Magazine
    Thanks, Pietro! If you missed the message the first time, he really wants you to see it in the new trilogy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Originally posted by Sir Sorcerer View Post
    I’m too lazy to search right now, but as I recall, early on in Gibson’s career he still thought of himself as an artist, so he was more interested in the visual images he was creating than the tech aspects. He used tech words that sounded cool instead of knowing much about them. That seems to be the case in the first parts of this trilogy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doc
    replied
    Originally posted by Kymba334 View Post
    I Sing The Body Electric by Ray Bradbury concludes with the poem Christus Apollo; a sequel poem titled Christ, Old Student in a New School makes an appearance in Again, Dangerous Visions (Book 1.)

    Three other Speculative Fiction books that might be considered to contain religious themes that i have read in the past :

    Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny
    Deathbird Stories
    by Harlan Ellison
    The Word of God
    by Thomas M. Disch
    Deathbird Stories! Ellison being Ellison.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sir Sorcerer
    replied
    William Gibson's Sprawl Trilogy.
    http://www.voidspace.org.uk/cyberpun...n_voodoo.shtml

    Leave a comment:


  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc View Post

    Phillip Pullman for sure. I know people who claim they didn’t get that as they were reading his work. It doesn’t exactly require deep reading, so maybe they were joking. I don’t know Reynolds’ work (although I have a book on my shelf).
    Didn't have to search far for this precise title of this article...

    Is Philip Pullman the anti-C.S.Lewis? | America Magazine

    Leave a comment:


  • Kymba334
    replied
    I Sing The Body Electric by Ray Bradbury concludes with the poem Christus Apollo; a sequel poem titled Christ, Old Student in a New School makes an appearance in Again, Dangerous Visions (Book 1.)

    Three other Speculative Fiction books that might be considered to contain religious themes that i have read in the past :

    Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny
    Deathbird Stories
    by Harlan Ellison
    The Word of God
    by Thomas M. Disch

    Leave a comment:

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