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Religion and Science Fiction Reading List

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  • Religion and Science Fiction Reading List

    Religion and Science Fiction Reading List

    9/17: Michael Moorcock, “Behold the Man”. 9/22: Robert Silverberg, “Good News from The Vatican”; McDevitt, “Gus” [TOPIC: Artificial Intelligence] ...

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  • #2
    I’ll answer fantasy and sci-f

    CSLewis: Space Trilogy
    George MacDonald: Lewis
    Charles Williams: most anything
    Lawhead: Pendragon cycle
    "Self-discipline and self-knowledge are the key. An individual becomes a unique universe, able to move at will through all the scales of the multiverse - potentially able to control the immediate reality of every scale, every encountered environment."
    --Contessa Rose von Bek, Blood part 4, chapter 12

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    • #3
      Scottish writers were much bothered by the nature of belief, good & evil, etc.


      David Lindsay's A Voyage to Arcturus is next level stuff.

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      • #4
        Not forgetting R.L. Stevenson's, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde, of course. Then, somewhat earlier, there's James Hoggs' weird piece of speculative fiction, Confessions of a Justified Sinner. Disturbing stuff. I blame Scotland's own particularily severe brand of Calvanism, myself.

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        • #5
          As far as regular SF goes (& slightly more Catholic in philosophy), I remember reading, A Canticle for Leibowitz, by Walter M. Miller Jr, back in the day. That one's about a religious order attempting to rebuild, after a devastating nuclear holocaust. Then, there's Frank Herbert's work, the, Dune, novels, of course, but also, The Jesus Incident. Finally, there's the later work of, Philip K. Dick, especially, Ubik. By the time Dick wrote that one, he was prone to hallucinatory visions of an explictly religious nature.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
            Finally, there's the later work of, Philip K. Dick, especially, Ubik. By the time Dick wrote that one, he was prone to hallucinatory visions of an explictly religious nature.
            This is a great addition. And appropriate, given the evangelical zeal Dick’s biggest fans always seem to have. 🙂

            Of course, Behold the Man is an amazing example of engaging with religion.

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            • #7
              I vaguely remember Alastair Reynolds being stridently anti-Christian. Phillip Pullman too. Whether you like that vibe is up to you!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Rothgo View Post
                I vaguely remember Alastair Reynolds being stridently anti-Christian. Phillip Pullman too. Whether you like that vibe is up to you!
                Phillip Pullman for sure. I know people who claim they didn’t get that as they were reading his work. It doesn’t exactly require deep reading, so maybe they were joking. I don’t know Reynolds’ work (although I have a book on my shelf).

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                • #9
                  Then, there's James Blish's, demoniacal, Black Easter trilogy. A reality where black magic & sorcery are real, the hordes of Hell are unleashed on the World. I've got a copy of the first novel in the series, but I haven't got round to reading it yet.

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                  • #10
                    I Sing The Body Electric by Ray Bradbury concludes with the poem Christus Apollo; a sequel poem titled Christ, Old Student in a New School makes an appearance in Again, Dangerous Visions (Book 1.)

                    Three other Speculative Fiction books that might be considered to contain religious themes that i have read in the past :

                    Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny
                    Deathbird Stories
                    by Harlan Ellison
                    The Word of God
                    by Thomas M. Disch
                    Mwana wa simba ni simba

                    The child of a lion is also a lion - Swahili Wisdom

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doc View Post

                      Phillip Pullman for sure. I know people who claim they didn’t get that as they were reading his work. It doesn’t exactly require deep reading, so maybe they were joking. I don’t know Reynolds’ work (although I have a book on my shelf).
                      Didn't have to search far for this precise title of this article...

                      Is Philip Pullman the anti-C.S.Lewis? | America Magazine

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                      • #12
                        William Gibson's Sprawl Trilogy.
                        http://www.voidspace.org.uk/cyberpun...n_voodoo.shtml

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kymba334 View Post
                          I Sing The Body Electric by Ray Bradbury concludes with the poem Christus Apollo; a sequel poem titled Christ, Old Student in a New School makes an appearance in Again, Dangerous Visions (Book 1.)

                          Three other Speculative Fiction books that might be considered to contain religious themes that i have read in the past :

                          Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny
                          Deathbird Stories
                          by Harlan Ellison
                          The Word of God
                          by Thomas M. Disch
                          Deathbird Stories! Ellison being Ellison.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Sir Sorcerer View Post
                            I’m too lazy to search right now, but as I recall, early on in Gibson’s career he still thought of himself as an artist, so he was more interested in the visual images he was creating than the tech aspects. He used tech words that sounded cool instead of knowing much about them. That seems to be the case in the first parts of this trilogy.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
                              Didn't have to search far for this precise title of this article...

                              Is Philip Pullman the anti-C.S.Lewis? | America Magazine
                              Thanks, Pietro! If you missed the message the first time, he really wants you to see it in the new trilogy.

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