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What book(s) are you reading in 2020?

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  • #61
    I’m a bit adhd, and tend to read a lot of books at once. I’m probably in the middle of 20 books or so right now:

    laughter of Carthage
    100 best fantasy
    London peculiar
    language instinct
    miracles
    priests of Ferris
    martin the warrior
    West Virginia ghost stories
    starluck
    haunted history of TALA
    acasio
    retreat from kakoda
    machiavelli’s discourses
    changeling storytellers guide
    serenity rpg
    fox’s book of martyrs
    city of god
    the heart of glass
    afterlife

    when I try to read one book at a time it just doesn’t work very well for me. This works better.
    "Self-discipline and self-knowledge are the key. An individual becomes a unique universe, able to move at will through all the scales of the multiverse - potentially able to control the immediate reality of every scale, every encountered environment."
    --Contessa Rose von Bek, Blood part 4, chapter 12

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    • #62
      Originally posted by J-Sun View Post
      I’m a bit adhd, and tend to read a lot of books at once. I’m probably in the middle of 20 books or so right now: This works better.
      Impressive yet a bit horrifying J-Sun !🤩...i have thought of myself as being ( in every way ) all over the road like some sort of J.G. Ballard car wreck but your kind of Biblo-mania seems beyond my understanding of the scale at which anyone could assimilate information. These days i'm trying more for the opposite : reading or skill building with a more narrowed focus and going for greater depth ( hopefully.)
      Neither way is "wrong" so please don't take this as a criticism!
      🙂
      Last edited by Kymba334; 08-18-2020, 03:09 PM.
      Mwana wa simba ni simba

      The child of a lion is also a lion - Swahili Wisdom

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      • #63
        Not a criticism. 😁
        Since I try to read a lot, if I were to read one book at a time I would finish some of the shorter ones within a day or two. I find that when I do that, I struggle to remember anything about them. By dragging them out to a chapter a day, i have more time to dwell on them. But then I need to read something like 5 or more at a time obviously or I’m barely reading.

        they say Teddy Roosevelt did the same.
        "Self-discipline and self-knowledge are the key. An individual becomes a unique universe, able to move at will through all the scales of the multiverse - potentially able to control the immediate reality of every scale, every encountered environment."
        --Contessa Rose von Bek, Blood part 4, chapter 12

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        • #64
          Originally posted by zlogdan View Post

          Fiction: Mike's Count Brass
          Bradbury; Something Wicked this way comes.
          .
          This is an interesting pair. Hope you make it through them.

          Something Wicked terrified me as a kid. The unease took awhile to shake. My biggest recollection is a sense of menace that permeated a bunch of conventional representations of joy.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Kymba334 View Post

            Impressive yet a bit horrifying J-Sun !🤩..[SIZE=14px][FONT=Times New Roman].i have thought of myself as being ( in every way ) all over the road like some sort of J.G. Ballard car wreck but your kind of Biblo-mania seems beyond my understanding of the scale at which anyone could assimilate information.
            More things should be described as J.G. Ballard car wrecks, and all such descriptions should be followed by a recommendation for Crash. Ballard is so great.
            Last edited by Doc; 08-18-2020, 06:38 PM.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by J-Sun View Post
              Not a criticism. 😁
              they say Teddy Roosevelt did the same.
              I get through some to-do lists that way. It seems like everything is barely started and suddenly I have three projects down. I occasionally read that way, especially if I’m in a period of heavy academic reading. I can keep three or four books going on an academic project, one novel, and a couple of short stories, but I often get completely single-minded and plow through one thing. No matter what! 😂

              I’m like you, though, when I stop, I can really stop. I always want to have something else going or
              ready to go when I’m about to finish something. Strange how that momentum works.



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              • #67
                I am trying not to be distracted from my goal of reading all of the Elric books (so far 3 down, 4 to go, but the Moonbeam Roads alone is over 1000 pages). But I also try to take it slowly as I am really enjoying the language and many layers of meaning in the stories. Discovering MM's work has been the best thing happening this year which has otherwise been a living hell.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by Sir Sorcerer View Post
                  I am trying not to be distracted from my goal of reading all of the Elric books (so far 3 down, 4 to go, but the Moonbeam Roads alone is over 1000 pages). But I also try to take it slowly as I am really enjoying the language and many layers of meaning in the stories. Discovering MM's work has been the best thing happening this year which has otherwise been a living hell.
                  Something good has to come from 2020. haha

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                  • #69
                    I read Pete Townshend's "Who I Am" last week. Some good stories and insights into his past but really nothing that stood out as particularly new or eye-opening that he hadn't talked about in previous interviews over the years. According to the afterward his first draft was about twice the length of the published memoir and I think it is a bit of a shame that we weren't given the long version which may have had more new material than what we ended with. His voice reminds me in many ways of Mike but that may just be an effect of era and geography, navigating the pop culture underground of 60's London. Overall, it was a fair read and worth it for those with an interest in Rock'n'Roll memoirs but I can't say one will learn much from it.
                    Last edited by EverKing; 09-04-2020, 02:27 PM.
                    "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro"
                    --Thomas a Kempis

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                    • #70
                      I'm actually going to read Titus Groan as I have ordered it from the library so that is exciting given it's good reputation. I have also ordered The king in yellow by Robert Chambers and Story of your life and others by Ted Chiang from the library. I have actually got a fair bit of reading time when I am on my train to colledge and waiting for my train so I can read faster.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Peacefulpie View Post
                        I'm actually going to read Titus Groan as I have ordered it from the library so that is exciting given it's good reputation. I have also ordered The king in yellow by Robert Chambers and Story of your life and others by Ted Chiang from the library. I have actually got a fair bit of reading time when I am on my train to colledge and waiting for my train so I can read faster.
                        King in yellow is great. I hope you enjoy it.
                        Titus Groans is on my reading list for next year.
                        "Self-discipline and self-knowledge are the key. An individual becomes a unique universe, able to move at will through all the scales of the multiverse - potentially able to control the immediate reality of every scale, every encountered environment."
                        --Contessa Rose von Bek, Blood part 4, chapter 12

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by J-Sun View Post
                          ...

                          Titus Groans is on my reading list for next year.
                          It was another Mike, a friend, who put me on to, Titus Groan. Those books are an extraordinary piece of work. When you start reading, you wonder what you're getting into, but Peake's artist's eye helps paint an extraordinary literary masterpiece. The most extraordinary characters gradually fill out & become surprisingly sympathetic. You're in for a treat. I'll say no more.

                          Me, I've been reading Dutch mediaevalist, Herman Pleij's Het gilde van de Blauwe Schuit (The Guild of the Blue boat), about carnival guilds & the development of the mediaeval town & its culture. There's no English translation, yet. Which is a pity. However, I did read & enjoy Pleij's, Dreaming of Cockaigne. Medieval Fantasies of the Perfect Life. That was a fascinating read. Pleij knows his subject & fantasy lands where geese come ready roasted, tarts grow on trees & rivers flow with wine, were the often speculative fiction of the Middle Ages.

                          Yesterday, I bought a copy of Umberto Eco's, Foucault's Pendulum. Looking forward to that one. More relevant than ever.

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
                            However, I did read & enjoy Pleij's, Dreaming of Cockaigne. Medieval Fantasies of the Perfect Life. That was a fascinating read.
                            Thanks for mentioning this, it sounds super interesting. I just finished Ginzburg's The Cheese and the Worms: The Cosmos of a Sixteenth-Century Miller and was searching for more books on utopian thought in the Middle Ages.

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
                              ... Yesterday, I bought a copy of Umberto Eco's, Foucault's Pendulum. Looking forward to that one. More relevant than ever.
                              The start is an utter slog. Is it worth it in the end? How many reach the end? As you've already committed your sheckles to the affair, its entirely up to you!

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                              • #75
                                While I feel compelled to read more Peake after seeing some of this thread (I’m a fan, but haven’t read any of his work for years), I’m knee deep in some of Natti Ronel’s work on positive criminology, which has a lot in common with some restorative justice models, but is more deeply invested in rehabilitation. About to try Charlie Jane Anders’ City in the Middle of the Night. I’ve read a little of her short fiction and commentary, so I have high hopes.

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