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What book(s) are you reading in 2020?

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  • #31
    Oops, I had originally posted this in the wrong forum.

    Just started Tad Williams's "The Dirty Streets of Heaven" the other night. It is a different speed compared to Williams's other work, told in an almost Gaiman-esque conversational first-person lilt. Not far into it, as yet, but so far it is entertaining. Once I'm done with that series (standard trilogy arrangement) I might finally go and finish Wheel of Time, which I had abandoned around book 7 or 8, if memory serves. It has been so long since I read any of it so it will likely require a re-read from page 1.
    "In omnibus requiem quaesivi, et nusquam inveni nisi in angulo cum libro"
    --Thomas a Kempis

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    • #32
      I’ve discovered or re-discovered some interesting stuff since we went into stasis; I can highly recommend Jasper Fforde’s Shades of Grey and Early Riser - clever and funny fantasy; also the Ben Aaronovitch Rivers of London series - police procedural with a copper wizard - not as Harry Potter as it sounds; on a very different note are the Shardlake series by CJ Sansom - historical mysteries set in Tudor England.

      I’ve recently devoured the wonderful Philip Marlowe books by Raymond Chandler and after a prompt from some unflattering reviews of a soon to be released BBC version of Pratchett’s Nights Watch series, I’ve just finished Guards! Guards! and Men at Arms.

      I need to dig out something new from the bookshelves.
      Let me tell you a story 'bout a poor boy....

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      • #33
        Originally posted by porcus_volans View Post
        I’ve discovered or re-discovered some interesting stuff since we went into stasis; I can highly recommend Jasper Fforde’s Shades of Grey and Early Riser - clever and funny fantasy; also the Ben Aaronovitch Rivers of London series - police procedural with a copper wizard - not as Harry Potter as it sounds; on a very different note are the Shardlake series by CJ Sansom - historical mysteries set in Tudor England.

        I’ve recently devoured the wonderful Philip Marlowe books by Raymond Chandler and after a prompt from some unflattering reviews of a soon to be released BBC version of Pratchett’s Nights Watch series, I’ve just finished Guards! Guards! and Men at Arms.

        I need to dig out something new from the bookshelves.
        I didn't know about that new Pratchett BBC series, hmmmm might be a fun show to check out despite the reviews. I read Snuff from his Discworld series last year and enjoyed it despite having not read any of the other earlier books in that series yet. I would be curious to see how Sam Vimes and some of his other characters in that series translate to the screen. I have Guards! Guards! on cassette audiobook that I've never taken the time to listen to. I should dig it out and pop it on the old cassette deck, hopefully it still works, I haven't used it that part of the stereo in at least 20 years! The story is read by Tony Robinson of Blackadder fame so it should be a treat to listen to.
        Last edited by Jack Of Shadows; 02-09-2020, 02:38 PM.
        "He found a coin in his pocket, flipped it. She called: 'Incubus!'
        'Succubus,' he said. 'Lucky old me.'" - Michael Moorcock The Final Programme

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        • #34
          Dance with Dragons, by GRR Martin. I'd read parts of the first of the third way back in 2006, I think, and had left it alone since then. Also Why Bob Dylan Matters, which is an indepth look at said singer-songwriter.
          sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

          Gold is the power of a man with a man
          And incense the power of man with God
          But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
          And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

          Nativity,
          by Peter Cape

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          • #35
            I just read Blood: A Southern Fantasy and am now reading Fabulous Harbours. They both finally came out as ebooks. The Second Ether trilogy is one of my absolute favorite series. I’m looking forward to War Amongst the Angels which comes out next week.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by fammann View Post
              I just read Blood: A Southern Fantasy and am now reading Fabulous Harbours. They both finally came out as ebooks. The Second Ether trilogy is one of my absolute favorite series. I’m looking forward to War Amongst the Angels which comes out next week.
              I have acquired Blood ebook last friday. I will try to read it too.
              "From time to time I demonstrate the inconceivable, or mock the innocent, or give truth to liars, or shred the poses of virtue.(...) Now I am silent; this is my mood." From Sundrun's Garden, Jack Vance.
              "As the Greeks have created the Olympus based upon their own image and resemblance, we have created Gotham City and Metropolis and all these galaxies so similar to the corporate world, manipulative, ruthless and well paid, that conceived them." Braulio Tavares.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Jack Of Shadows View Post

                I didn't know about that new Pratchett BBC series, hmmmm might be a fun show to check out despite the reviews. I read Snuff from his Discworld series last year and enjoyed it despite having not read any of the other earlier books in that series yet. I would be curious to see how Sam Vimes and some of his other characters in that series translate to the screen. I have Guards! Guards! on cassette audiobook that I've never taken the time to listen to. I should dig it out and pop it on the old cassette deck, hopefully it still works, I haven't used it that part of the stereo in at least 20 years! The story is read by Tony Robinson of Blackadder fame so it should be a treat to listen to.
                I’m not a fan of the audio versions of Pratchett’s books. Part of the fun of reading fantasy is using my own imagination to translate the voices in my head. It’s the same with putting fantasy on screen. It’s rarely better than what I imagined when I read the books.

                Certainly, Sky’s previous attempts to put Hogfather and Going Postal on TV were disappointing.

                And some of the audio versions are abridged so beware of that too.

                Ive picked up a PG Wodehouse.


                Let me tell you a story 'bout a poor boy....

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by porcus_volans View Post

                  I’m not a fan of the audio versions of Pratchett’s books. Part of the fun of reading fantasy is using my own imagination to translate the voices in my head. It’s the same with putting fantasy on screen. It’s rarely better than what I imagined when I read the books.

                  Certainly, Sky’s previous attempts to put Hogfather and Going Postal on TV were disappointing.

                  And some of the audio versions are abridged so beware of that too.

                  Ive picked up a PG Wodehouse.

                  The audio version I have of Guards! Guards! is abridged and probably quite a bit being only on 2 cassettes. I'll still give it a listen, but it won't be a replacement for reading the book.

                  I haven't read too many from PG Wodehouse, but the ones I have I really enjoyed and loved the humor. I thought the TV series Jeeves And Wooster did justice to Wodehouse and Stephen Fry And Hugh Laurie were excellent choices for the roles.
                  "He found a coin in his pocket, flipped it. She called: 'Incubus!'
                  'Succubus,' he said. 'Lucky old me.'" - Michael Moorcock The Final Programme

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                  • #39
                    Just finished The Name of the Wind by PatrickRothfuss. Best fantasy I’ve read in years. Nothing sophisticated, no genre bending. Just good fun in a well-crafted world
                    Kevin McCabe
                    The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Kevin McCabe View Post
                      Just finished The Name of the Wind by PatrickRothfuss. Best fantasy I’ve read in years. Nothing sophisticated, no genre bending. Just good fun in a well-crafted world
                      Yeah it's a great read. Shame I've been waiting years for the next book.. I'll have to reread the books if the new one comes out to refresh my memory.

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