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What book are you reading at the moment?

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  • Stumbled across 'The Eiger Sanction' quite by accident and am enjoying it immensely.

    Jonathan Hemlock lives in a renovated Gothic church on Long Island. He is an art professor, a mountain climber, and a mercenary, performing assassinations (i.e., sanctions) for money to augment his black-market art collection. Now Hemlock is being tricked into a hazardous assignment that involves an attempt to scale one of the most treacherous mountain peaks in the Swiss Alps, the Eiger.
    Also have 'Shibumi' by the same author.

    Nicholai Hel is the world’s most wanted man. Born in Shanghai during the chaos of World War I, he is the son of an aristocratic Russian mother and a mysterious German father and is the protégé of a Japanese Go master. Hel survived the destruction of Hiroshima to emerge as the world’s most artful lover and its most accomplished—and well-paid—assassin. Hel is a genius, a mystic, and a master of language and culture, and his secret is his determination to attain a rare kind of personal excellence, a state of effortless perfection known only as shibumi.

    Now living in an isolated mountain fortress with his exquisite mistress, Hel is unwillingly drawn back into the life he’d tried to leave behind when a beautiful young stranger arrives at his door, seeking help and refuge. It soon becomes clear that Hel is being tracked by his most sinister enemy—a supermonolith of international espionage known only as the Mother Company. The battle lines are drawn: ruthless power and corruption on one side, and on the other . . . shibumi.
    Have to say - these premises are fantastic!
    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

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    • Originally posted by devilchicken View Post
      Stumbled across 'The Eiger Sanction' quite by accident and am enjoying it immensely.



      Also have 'Shibumi' by the same author.



      Have to say - these premises are fantastic!
      I really like Trevanian. I'm especially fond of the Hemlock books, Shibumi, and The Main. Frankly, I'm surprised there aren't more folks lauding the Hemlock books and Shibumi hereabouts, as they are classic anti-hero novels. I'm also quite fond of the film. There's one scene that I live by, a lot of days. For me, its a toss up as to whether I like The Eiger Sanction or Where Eagles Dare better when it comes to Eastwood.
      Kevin McCabe
      The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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      • River God and Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. I was reading the story of R.E.M. have to start reading that again

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        • Originally posted by Kevin McCabe View Post
          I really like Trevanian. I'm especially fond of the Hemlock books, Shibumi, and The Main. Frankly, I'm surprised there aren't more folks lauding the Hemlock books and Shibumi hereabouts, as they are classic anti-hero novels. I'm also quite fond of the film. There's one scene that I live by, a lot of days. For me, its a toss up as to whether I like The Eiger Sanction or Where Eagles Dare better when it comes to Eastwood.
          I didn't really like the film too much - Clint Eastwood is a bit too 'stone-faced' to do sardonic.
          Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

          Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

          Comment


          • I'm finally getting around to reading The Traveler by John Twelve Hawks. I had pretty high expectations because of all of the buzz I read. I'm about halfway through it. It is a decent enough read, but I'm not sure if it is as earth-shattering as some of the reviews make it out to be.

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            • I started that - but didn't like the writing.
              Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

              Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

              Comment


              • Gateway
                by F.Pohl
                I expected to read a sf masterpiece and I am disappointed.But at least,I like the main character and the writing is not bad.

                Oh,and I just finished
                The Art of war,
                by Sun Tsu

                It is small and even in those few pages you may read similar things again and again.But it is a must for everyone interested in strategy and tactics.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Heiron View Post
                  Gateway
                  by F.Pohl
                  I expected to read a sf masterpiece and I am disappointed.But at least,I like the main character and the writing is not bad.

                  Oh,and I just finished
                  The Art of war,
                  by Sun Tsu

                  It is small and even in those few pages you may read similar things again and again.But it is a must for everyone interested in strategy and tactics.
                  Try Robert Forward's Dragon's Egg - wonderful sci fi book - not at all fantasy - name is misleading:

                  Review
                  "Forward's book is a knockout. In science fiction there is only a handful of books that stretch the mind--and this is one of them!"
                  --ARTHUR C. CLARKE

                  "Bob Forward writes in the tradition of Hal Clement's Mission Gravity and carries it a giant step (how else?) forward."
                  --ISAAC ASIMOV

                  "Dragon's Egg is superb. I couldn't have written it; it required too much real physics."
                  --LARRY NIVEN

                  "This is one for the real science-fiction fan."
                  --FRANK HERBERT

                  "Robert L. Forward tells a good story and asks a profound question. If we run into a race of creatures who live a hundred years while we live an hour, what can they say to us or we to them?"
                  --FREEMAN J. DYSON
                  Author of Disturbing the Universe

                  "Forward has impeccable scientific credentials, and . . . big, original, speculative ideas."
                  --The Washington Post

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by devilchicken View Post
                    I didn't really like the film too much - Clint Eastwood is a bit too 'stone-faced' to do sardonic.
                    I'm biased. I used to love to climb. On the other hand, that one scene with the young climber is universal.
                    Kevin McCabe
                    The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Doc View Post
                      I'm finally getting around to reading The Traveler by John Twelve Hawks. I had pretty high expectations because of all of the buzz I read. I'm about halfway through it. It is a decent enough read, but I'm not sure if it is as earth-shattering as some of the reviews make it out to be.
                      I liked it, but its nowhere near as exciting as Moorcock and not as truly original as - say - Neuromancer. I think maybe its the price thats paid for compromise to play to a wider (NY Times type) audience. Gibson's more recent offerings suffer from the same type of thing. Its not a bad thing, really. Both writers are writing in very near future terms. That makes it more accesible to the masses, but I'm used to suspending disbelief a bit more to get a lot more wow! I recently read the sequel and also Gibson's latest. I did find something interesting common to both (though, a bit contrived in Gibson)
                      Kevin McCabe
                      The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Kevin McCabe View Post
                        I liked it, but its nowhere near as exciting as Moorcock and not as truly original as - say - Neuromancer. I think maybe its the price thats paid for compromise to play to a wider (NY Times type) audience.

                        I finished The Traveler over the weekend, and I agree with most of your sentiments. The themes echo some of Mike's basic ideas about chaos and order, and they are interesting (if not as well done as, say, the Second Ether trilogy), but they take a very distinct back seat to relatively mindless action. Still, I'm into it enough to try the sequel at some point. However, much of this is because I feel cheated out of an ending.

                        Gibson is one of those people who seems to have cornered the market on smart ideas written for a mass audience. I don't find him as self-congratulatory as some. Bruce Sterling is OK, too, but I don't find his writing as strong, even if the ideas and story are nearly so.

                        Having said all of that, I am not trying to be a "against the mass market" literary snob. On the contrary, I'm excited that people with that kind of readership are actually including challenging ideas in their work, even if they don't really do them justice.

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                        • The Blood Red Game and I had to put it down for a minute to see what condition my condition was in.

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                          • just finished reading the last of the corum books again, the sword and the stallion. thinking of rereading the invasion earth series by Hubbard again, i recommend them...

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                            • A Darkness At Sethanon.

                              Interview Wtih The Vampire. Again.
                              They're all true... Especially the lies.

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                              • I just finished reading Battle Royale by Koushun Takami. Smart, masterfuly written, deeply emotional and brave book.

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