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What book are you reading at the moment?

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  • So far, despite many Amazon reviews that panned it, for me, Sorcerers of Majipoor is my favorite of the series. The characters seem more fleshed out and the Machiavellian political manipulations are very believable and make for a high intrigue plot.
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    • For once, I'm between books without something to read. I'm reading my current issue of Aviation History, which has a good, if brief, article about one of my fave WWII planes, the Northrup P-61 Black Widow, America's first purpose built all-weather night fighter. The article also mentions a good 1/72nd scale kit of the plane that scored the last official aerial victory of WWII, 548 Night Fighter Squadron's Lady In The Dark. What the article fails to mention is that the kit is out of production and now very hard to find or very expensive.

      I'm going to buy the new version of "To Rescue Tanelorn" this week and start in on that.

      Take care!

      WhiteWolf359
      Lord Warshaw the Unknown

      "Except in dreams, you're never really free." Warren Zevon, Desperados Under the Eaves.

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      • ...

        Originally posted by Dead-Air View Post
        So far, despite many Amazon reviews that panned it, for me, Sorcerers of Majipoor is my favorite of the series. The characters seem more fleshed out and the Machiavellian political manipulations are very believable and make for a high intrigue plot.
        Sorry, DA: This is my take on it....

        Lord Pinkipants frowned and took another sip of his Bullshidden wine. Rancilor-Vasbehind the Ansedillemian nobleman from Shinkehuythipparan province whose father, Lopparan-Qwertypin has usurped Lord Pinkipants’ father from his throne, and whose mother wore the rune-covered diadem of Nekty, gazed levelly at Pinkipants with his zxcvb-colored eyes.
        “Rancilor-Vasbehind!” The Ansedillemian did not stir.
        Again. “Rancilor-Vasbehind!!”. This time the nobleman from Shinke province took a languid bite from his Asdfghed cake and replied.
        “Yes, Lord Pinkipants, I am Rancilor-Vasbehind. What of it?”
        “How do you think I feel, Rancilor-Vasbehind?”
        “I have no idea, my Lord Pinkipants. Maybe a bit unhappy?” He made the Lifsaver gesture to Lord Prinkipants and turned his back, shuddering with disgust.
        Lord Prinkipants would never see or hear from him again.


        ...OK, OK, I may be paraphrasing, but it is with turgid dialog like this that Robert Silverberg fills up a thick book and gets royalties. With unlikeable characters and way too many forgettable names and places, Silverberg talks about a giant planet, with a huge population and giant cities, yet utterly fails to convey any sense of real size of the planet, or the way, way, WAY too many cities they travel through. They could be punting up the Oxford canal, as far as you are able to to gather.

        I made it 4/5 of the way through the book, then skip-read to the end, in the hope that there would be a nuclear explosion to kill them all, and at least end with something interesting. Alas and alack, not even this.

        Lacking both the interesting characters of the original “Lord Valentine’s Castle” trilogy and reading like some kind of memory test, this rates the UncleDes seven tentacles down… way WAY down.

        It actually depressed me.

        Des
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        • Use of Weapons - Iain M. Banks
          Kevin McCabe
          The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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          • The Naked Sun-Isaac Asimov
            "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

            Hunter S Thompson

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            • Originally posted by UncleDes View Post
              Sorry, DA: This is my take on it....

              Lord Pinkipants frowned and took another sip of his Bullshidden wine. Rancilor-Vasbehind the Ansedillemian nobleman from Shinkehuythipparan province whose father, Lopparan-Qwertypin has usurped Lord Pinkipants’ father from his throne, and whose mother wore the rune-covered diadem of Nekty, gazed levelly at Pinkipants with his zxcvb-colored eyes.
              “Rancilor-Vasbehind!” The Ansedillemian did not stir.
              Again. “Rancilor-Vasbehind!!”. This time the nobleman from Shinke province took a languid bite from his Asdfghed cake and replied.
              “Yes, Lord Pinkipants, I am Rancilor-Vasbehind. What of it?”
              “How do you think I feel, Rancilor-Vasbehind?”
              “I have no idea, my Lord Pinkipants. Maybe a bit unhappy?” He made the Lifsaver gesture to Lord Prinkipants and turned his back, shuddering with disgust.
              Lord Prinkipants would never see or hear from him again.


              ...OK, OK, I may be paraphrasing, but it is with turgid dialog like this that Robert Silverberg fills up a thick book and gets royalties. With unlikeable characters and way too many forgettable names and places, Silverberg talks about a giant planet, with a huge population and giant cities, yet utterly fails to convey any sense of real size of the planet, or the way, way, WAY too many cities they travel through. They could be punting up the Oxford canal, as far as you are able to to gather.

              I made it 4/5 of the way through the book, then skip-read to the end, in the hope that there would be a nuclear explosion to kill them all, and at least end with something interesting. Alas and alack, not even this.

              Lacking both the interesting characters of the original “Lord Valentine’s Castle” trilogy and reading like some kind of memory test, this rates the UncleDes seven tentacles down… way WAY down.

              It actually depressed me.

              Des
              Your viewpoint is not alone, and that's why I went into it with trepidation.

              However, I find it just hasn't been that way for me. I like Prestimion and I think the downfall of Korsibar as a good man pressured into kinghood and then betrayed by those who did so is fine drama. The whole thing reminds me of a Shakespeare plot.

              That said, I agree that it feels much more on an alternate Earth than the giant but not dense planet explained in Lord Valentine's Castle. And I have a high degree of personal irritation in this whole series with how he throws around thousands of years, yet has the technology and society stay so much the same, and just constantly allude to the fall of scientific knowledge way back when without ever explaining why everyone is too stupid to reinvent any of it over millennia. I just force myself to swallow that part as the Fantasy in Science Fantasy, and get on with the parts I like.
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              • The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie
                Chicken Little is alive and well. He works at CNN.

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                • Currently Reading...

                  Fragile Things by Niel Gaiman- Ive enjoyed several of his other books, and have had this one on my "To Read" book shelf for a little while, so I randomly picked it and just started yesterday.

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                  • Just started reading 'Atilla the Hun' by John Man. I've read 'Ghengis Khan' by him, which was very well done, and this one is shaping up the same way. I'm already knee deep in Visigoths and Ostrogoths.
                    You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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                    "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

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                    • Kostova, Elizabeth. The Historian.
                      Thick as wind-blown leaves innumerable, since 1985

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                      • Gettin into some short stories-

                        New Arrivals,Old Encounters-Brian Aldiss
                        "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                        Hunter S Thompson

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                        • I read The Historian about a year ago- it was pretty good.

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                          • Is that the Kostova book concerning Vlad the Impaler Champ et?
                            "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                            Hunter S Thompson

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                            • Finished The Adventures 0f Una Persson & Catherine Cornelius in the Twentieth Century & then The Alchemists Question. Really good--two of my favorites, actually; it's interesting how satisfying AQ is as a finale.

                              Now I'm on Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny, thanks again to Uncle Des! Next up, Jack of Shadows, also Zelazny, courtesy of deep Fixer.
                              McN

                              "I learned: the first lesson of my life: nobody can face the world with his eyes open all the time." Salman Rushdie, 'Midnight's Children'

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                              • Just opened M J Harrisons The Centauri Device.
                                "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                                Hunter S Thompson

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