Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

What book are you reading at the moment?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    For Class-1, Grade-A Trash, you really need to read this book:



    Book Description
    December 2001: Vince McMahon steps out of a snowy night into a diner in upstate New York for a meeting with old friend Phil Thomson, now a highly placed government official. Thomson has a strange proposition: creating a new covert black-ops group using the Superstars of World Wrestling Entertainment. The WWE's talented men and women are perfect. Highly skilled athletes with the ideal cover, they travel all across the country and the globe; no one would find it unusual to find them in a town one day and gone the next. The government would train and support the wrestlers in every way possible except one: no one must know the truth.

    March 2006: The Superstars have been handed their latest assignment -- take down a commercial-grade methyl-amphetamine plant that is bankrolling terrorist activities in Europe. Their mission seems simple and straightforward, until a member of their team is taken prisoner. Now all that they've worked so hard for is in jeopardy, and one of their own might be killed...
    See also The lowdown on Big Apple Takedown for a hilarious review.
    Attached Files
    _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
    _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
    _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
    _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

    Comment


    • #62
      That looks hilarious!
      I recently met King Booker(T) and Queen Sharmell from WWE. He is the one of shyest and most unassuming people I've met. And Sharmell is a knockout...way prettier without all that makeup they pile on her for tv.

      Comment


      • #63
        A History of Private Life by Philippe Aries and Georges Duby. Five volumes of about 700 pages each. They "chart" the changing inner history of people in rich and colourful detail compiled from a great variety of sources
        I am not reading the entire 3500 pages but leaf through them at random and nearly always find fascinating aspects.


        1. A History of Private Life: From Pagan Rome to Byzantium
        2. A History of Private Life: Revelations of the Medieval World
        3.A History of Private Life: Passions of the Renaissance
        4. A History of Private Life: From the Fires of Revolution to the Great War
        5. A History of Private Life: Riddles of Identity in Modern Times

        Could also serve as an excellent source of reference for anybody who plans to write stories set in the past !!!!
        Last edited by L'Etranger; 11-16-2006, 12:56 AM.
        Google ergo sum

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by L'Etranger
          A History of Private Life by Philippe Aries and Georges Duby. Five volumes of about 700 pages each. They "chart" the changing inner history of people in rich and colourful detail compiled from a great variety of sources
          I am not reading the entire 3500 pages but leaf through them at random and nearly always find fascinating aspects.


          1. A History of Private Life: From Pagan Rome to Byzantium
          2. A History of Private Life: Revelations of the Medieval World
          3.A History of Private Life: Passions of the Renaissance
          4. A History of Private Life: From the Fires of Revolution to the Great War
          5. A History of Private Life: Riddles of Identity in Modern Times

          Could also serve as an excellent source of reference for anybody who plans to write stories set in the past !!!!
          Thanks for posting the link L'Etranger. I have the Revelations of the Medieval World. Looking forward to the others

          Comment


          • #65
            Good to hear that, Idiot Savant.
            Google ergo sum

            Comment


            • #66
              Having just finished two "silly" books - "Second Angel" by Phillip Kerr and "The Shanghai Union of Industrial Mystics" by Nury Vitachi (sp?) - I have picked up "Heart of Darkness" by Joseph Conrad, something I haven't read since I was much younger.... Bloody Hell! I had forgotten just how good it is!
              Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
              Bakunin

              Comment


              • #67
                After seeing Groakes' and L'E's heavy reeading, I feel like I need to read the WWE novel. They are doing enough heavy lifting for the rest of us.

                For what its worth, I'm re-reading Mieville's The Scar, and just starting a book of Baudrillard's essays edited by Mark Poster.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Just started reading 'The Time Machine' with a view to following it up with Baxter's 'The Time Ships' and K.W. Jeter's 'Morlock Night.'

                  I've read them all before but never all together. Should be fun. Total steampunk!

                  Still plodding through Frazer's 'The Golden Bough.' It's very good but rather slow going. I've also got 'The Jungle' by Upton Sinclair ('a story so shocking it launched a government investigation!') on the go as well.

                  To be honest I'm after a bit of light relief with 'The Time Machine' etc.

                  Those books you listed look fascinating L'E. This is an area which seems to be getting more coverage of late. I read a rather good one about the England of Elizabeth I not too long back and I've got a Penguin classic about the Aztecs which gives a similar treatment.
                  You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

                  -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

                  Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

                  :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


                  "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Robin Hobb's 'Forest Mage'. Finished it last night at 03.00am after a 12 hour readathon. Loved it. Loved the first book in the set as well, 'Shaman's Crossing'. Magical stuff! Anyone else out there like her work?
                    He's well smoked

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Hah! Stealer of Souls, paperback Mayflower edition, following Elric and Sailor on the Seas of Fate. Wallowing in nostalgic bliss.....
                      He's well smoked

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Do androids dream of electric sheep?

                        Well,I am a fan of Dick so it is a must read and I enjoy it.Plus I was haunted as a kid when I stayed till late at night to watch Blade runner.I remember once someone said "a,there is also a book on the subject but it's not good".
                        I am sure he hadn't read it.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          'The Dispossessed' by Ursula Le Guin So I can prove to my non-existant anarchist friends that s-f is the genre of the revolution
                          and
                          'The Spanish Civil War' by Paul Preston Because I've left it too long to read a book on an important subject

                          Oh, and a couple of issues of the Fortean times and a variety of RPG's strewn about my room.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Necrocute
                            'The Dispossessed' by Ursula Le Guin So I can prove to my non-existant anarchist friends that s-f is the genre of the revolution
                            and
                            'The Spanish Civil War' by Paul Preston Because I've left it too long to read a book on an important subject

                            Oh, and a couple of issues of the Fortean times and a variety of RPG's strewn about my room.
                            The Paul Preston book is very good. The savagery of the Nationalists takes your breath away & Franco's continuation of the divisions of the war to the day he died are shocking. Paul Preston also did an acclaimed biography of Franco another well worth reading.
                            Arioch, aid me! Blood and souls for Arioch!

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by silverhand
                              The Paul Preston book is very good. The savagery of the Nationalists takes your breath away & Franco's continuation of the divisions of the war to the day he died are shocking. Paul Preston also did an acclaimed biography of Franco another well worth reading.
                              To be honest I've only just gotten past the introduction (but having some grounding i.e a history degree and umm stuff) it's kind of frightening how particularly over here the Spanish Civil war seems totally forgotten and how the shadows of it were still infecting spain for another generation-people ignore how whilst the Germans were issuing apologies for the war, the official spanish line seemed to be yay! the fascists beat the insurgents!

                              Or is that me, seeing everything rather simply again?

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                I don't think that it can be looked at simply! To all intents and purposes, it was a precursor to WW2, as was the Japanese invasion of Manchuria and China and the Italian campaigns in NE Africa. Like those wars it has suffered from being eclipsed by the 'big one', to a great extent. Unlike those wars, it was fought for ideals, between differing political ideologies. As I understand it, from what I've read and remember from school, and the discovery channel of course! The bloodiest wars seem to be the civil ones, don't you think?
                                As far as the Spanish official line goes - I'd say that the winners always get to put the story in the way that best suits their cause!
                                He's well smoked

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X