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What book are you reading at the moment?

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  • Originally posted by The Dark Mage Of Melnibone View Post
    A Darkness At Sethanon.

    Hey,Dark Mage!Is it good enough?Better/worse than Magician?I was so close to buying it when I remembered Valis was waiting for me unread so I postponed continuing the Riftwar Saga.

    Btw,I am reading VALIS,by PKD and another book,a Greek one,about strange quotes from ancient writers about supernatural incidents.

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    • just tanned the entropy tango and am a third of the way through will selfs book of dave
      "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

      Hunter S Thompson

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      • Originally posted by thingfish View Post
        just tanned the entropy tango and am a third of the way through will selfs book of dave
        What did you think of The Entropy Tango?

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        • I just ordered the first Paizo Kane reprint - though according to amazon it may be some time until I receive it. I'll have to check out some bookstores - see if they stock it.
          Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

          Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

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          • Originally posted by Doc View Post
            What did you think of The Entropy Tango?
            hi doc i thought the entropy tango was yet another fine excursion by the time centre jockeys.My only slight dissapointment on a personal level was the vulnerability towards the end of in my mind the indestructable una.We all expect that from jerry but UNA! Another minor interesting point was the illustrative portrayal of major nye as george orwell.
            "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

            Hunter S Thompson

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            • Originally posted by devilchicken View Post
              I just ordered the first Paizo Kane reprint - though according to amazon it may be some time until I receive it. I'll have to check out some bookstores - see if they stock it.

              Check out biblio.com

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              • John Kelly's "The Great Mortality" being a history of the (misnamed) Black Death of 1347. As good an arguement for evolution as you will come across....
                Does it follow that I reject all authority? Perish the thought. In the matter of boots, I defer to the authority of the boot-maker.
                Bakunin

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                • Hey, Groakes! You always seem to be reading interesting things. Good to see you sharing your stuff.

                  I'm reading Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action, in part to straighten out some ideas that people on the site jarred loose.

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                  • Finished the Eiger Sanction - decided to give The Three Musketeers a whirl.
                    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

                    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

                    Comment


                    • Reading Robert A Heinlein's Methuselah's Children and Robert Aspirin and Jody Lynn Nye's newest 'Myth Adventure' book Class Dis-Mythed.

                      Last week, I finished rereading Jack Vance's Dying Earth books. Very good example of why he's my #2 fav author!
                      Madness is always the best armor against Reality

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                      • Finished 'Nelson', and was a little disappointed. It could probably have been about 100 pages longer and it didn't actually say which eye he lost his sight in! I had to check Wikipedia to find out. That said I think the jingoism and feelings of national pride etc that Nelson has been used to stir up are still reverberating in the UK today and it was very intersting to see how the stories that people want to believe about him are actually preferred over what would appear to be the truth.

                        Currently reading 'Tommy'. I'm fascinated by this period - my great grandfather fought in this war, and while I remember him very well, I was never old enough to appreciate what he had actually done. I feel I can get a little closer to him by getting a greater understanding of one the the biggest things that happened to him. So far, very well written and very interesting and informative.
                        Last edited by Governor of Rowe Island; 09-28-2007, 03:56 PM.
                        You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

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                        "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

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                        • Originally posted by DeepFixer View Post
                          Reading Robert A Heinlein's Methuselah's Children and Robert Aspirin and Jody Lynn Nye's newest 'Myth Adventure' book Class Dis-Mythed.

                          Last week, I finished rereading Jack Vance's Dying Earth books. Very good example of why he's my #2 fav author!
                          ah the howard family what a bunch am also reading some heinlein,time enough for love which is a bit of an epic but quite addictive up to now. All the best.
                          "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                          Hunter S Thompson

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                          • Just started The Birthgrave by Tanith Lee. See the thread I posted below about the group read I'm participating in for this book. Vance fans take note, the introduction by Marion Zimmer Bradley compares it to The Dying Earth setting.
                            My Facebook; My Band; My Radio Show; My Flickr Page; Science Fiction Message Board

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                            • "Waterlog" by Roger Deakin
                              I have been enjoying this soo much bascically he is going roung England Swiming in open water that is not Swiming pools eg rivers tarns dykes llyns, he goes to the Rhinogs in Wales. I love it he is obviously a free spirit like me.
                              He makes me want to go bakc to the Rhinogs, I think evryone on here should go to the Rhinogs in wales they are so rough and wild and hardly anybody goes there this really is the kind of place you could imagine fantastic story happening, if if aint allready, there are loads of half collapsed walls and tiny clearings round there and its an absolute nightmare to get anywher fast as the terrian is soo rugged

                              Roger puts loads of those details in that make me love him, about notes in English villages encounters with people who dont want him swimimng where he issent paying to do so, meeting up with people who tell him where they use to swim

                              he has also done a book I think called WildWood which I heard on BBC Radio4 which strucjk such a chord with me I had to read more. When i have enough money I am going to go out and buy both these books. and if I can afford buy copies to give as presents.

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                              • Originally posted by dobah View Post
                                "Waterlog" by Roger Deakin
                                I have been enjoying this soo much bascically he is going roung England Swiming in open water that is not Swiming pools eg rivers tarns dykes llyns, he goes to the Rhinogs in Wales. I love it he is obviously a free spirit like me.
                                He makes me want to go bakc to the Rhinogs, I think evryone on here should go to the Rhinogs in wales they are so rough and wild and hardly anybody goes there this really is the kind of place you could imagine fantastic story happening, if if aint allready, there are loads of half collapsed walls and tiny clearings round there and its an absolute nightmare to get anywher fast as the terrian is soo rugged

                                Roger puts loads of those details in that make me love him, about notes in English villages encounters with people who dont want him swimimng where he issent paying to do so, meeting up with people who tell him where they use to swim

                                he has also done a book I think called WildWood which I heard on BBC Radio4 which strucjk such a chord with me I had to read more. When i have enough money I am going to go out and buy both these books. and if I can afford buy copies to give as presents.
                                First, a question. Are Rhinogs those pools that sheepherders constructed on the mountaintops when God was a lad to harvest moisture from clouds for the flocks during the dry months?

                                Second, a piece of odd lore. Do you know the old legend about the iron age Irish solar hero Chuchulain that says he got some of his magic from swimming in each of the rivers of Ireland because each had a different magical quality associated with it?

                                Third, I love swimming in lakes and rivers myself. But, I have to admit that a salt water olympic size pool on the shore of the Sound is a pretty good swim. The brothers who finished off Central Park in New York had a country place out here in Seattle (its now the St. Michelle Winery and has incredible grounds). They designed a bunch of cooll parks out here and the Coleman pool is located in one of them. Built in the thirties and stil clean and idyllic.
                                Kevin McCabe
                                The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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