Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Poul Anderson's - The Broken Sword

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Poul Anderson's - The Broken Sword

    Did Poul Anderson ever do a sequel to this?
    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

  • #2
    No.

    He did a tangential follow-on called The Demon of Scattery, but it's not a sequel. (It uses two of the characters in a dialogue to provide a narrative frame around a completely unrelated story. It's not very good.) It's not even closely related.

    I'm not sure I would have wanted a sequel. Anderson spoke and wrote over the years of possibly writing a sequel, but either he couldn't do it, or he never got around to it.

    If you really liked the book, I can't direct you towards anything else he wrote that's comparable. His fantasy novels Three Hearts and Three Lions and Operation Chaos are entertaining enough, but they're not at the same level of performance as The Broken Sword. His later fantasy novels, A Midsummer Tempest and The Merman's Children are (mostly) light weight, although The Merman's... in some ways seems a reconsideration of the mortal-versus-faery motif in The Broken Sword.

    Note that I haven't read these books in over 25 years; but I've got a somewhat better than adequate memory.

    LSN

    Comment


    • #3
      The Broken Sword stands unique among Poul Anderson's books. I really wish he had written the sequel, but it looks like he was unable to recreate the creative fire in which the original was forged. Sadly he passed away in 2001.

      Comment


      • #4
        I was a little curious from the abrupt (but appropriate) way the story ended - Skaflocs son being taken by Odin, with the ominous hint that the kid was destined to continue the swords work.

        Brilliantly written book - I can certainly see the influences in Mikes work.
        Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

        Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

        Comment


        • #5
          The references to the Volsunga and Das Ring des Niebelungen make it pretty clear where the story was going.

          I suspect Anderson never got into a Goetterdamerung kind of mood after this book. (Although he comes close at times in things like Mirkheim and A Knight of Ghosts and Shadows. But those are sf.)

          LSN

          Comment

          Working...
          X