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Naked Lunch

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  • Naked Lunch

    Okay, following the comments in the [broken link]Most over-rated novel in your humble opinion thread, I given in and decided to give Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs another go. I've picked up the 'restored text' version to see if it makes more sense than the original copy that I borrowed. I've also bought the movie. Let's see if I can make it to the end this time. :)
    Last edited by Rothgo; 04-08-2010, 11:15 AM.

  • #2
    The movie could be a good way in. Cronenbourg very sensibly realised that the book itself was unfilmable, so it's a kind of fictionalised riff around the writing of it. Great soundtrack by Ornette Coleman (for people who like that sort of thing...)
    \"...an ape reft of his tail, and grown rusty at climbing, who yet feels himself to be a symbol and the frail representative of Omnipotence in a place that is not home.\" James Branch Cabell

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    • #3
      So that's who the soundtrack is by! Yes, fantastic stuff!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Typhoid_Mary
        So that's who the soundtrack is by! Yes, fantastic stuff!
        Howard Shore, a long-standing Cronenberg collaborator, had a significant hand in the score for Naked Lunch as well.

        I've the OST cassette in the car atm and my 5-yr old daughter recently announced she loves 'that crazy music'! :lol:
        _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
        _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
        _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
        _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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        • #5
          Coleman's pre-70s work never hit the spot for me, much more into Coltrane, even Davis' Bitches Brew experiments, such as they were, but after Coleman's Prime Time and his harmelodic (sp?) theory stuff, WOW! Rock-Jazz in the best sense.
          "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

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          • #6
            Finally watched the film. I found it quite enjoyable although my friends gave up on it before things really started happening. Going to start the book this weekend providing I get the time to sit down with it.

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