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Pratchett anger at Rowling's rise

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  • Mikey_C
    replied
    Originally posted by demos99
    Originally posted by Mikey_C
    I mean - Shakespeare excelled at many forms, but the graphic novel was not one of them![/i]
    Actually, graphic novels are one of the things that Shakespeare can do really rather well - certainly far better than conventional novelists. Think about it, all Shakespeare really is is dialogue.
    You've got a point there - it could be better than just reading it in black and white. I don't think my friend the teacher would have had much time for graphic novels by anyone, to tell the truth. However, I certainly agree with her that treating Shakespeare as a 'sacred text' that everyone must read is crazy. Many of those kids would have had problems following a Batman comic, so maybe they should just focus on that kind of thing - one of those comic versions of the latest Hollywood film might strike a chord with them, no matter how anyone else might sniff...

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  • MissDreamy
    replied
    Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
    Aw poop! More competition? I'm getting tired of all of these people with successful careers in other fields, suddenly revealing that they can also draw really well. I studied long and hard to... er... actually I got grade C GCSE, and then gave up, but it's the principle that counts... er... :(
    I know, Neil Gaiman's another! Grrrrr... And I did study long and hard in art! :)

    Liking the new smilies! :woot:

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
    Friar Laurence
    He was the drug dealer wasn't he? javascript:emoticon('')

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  • DeeCrowSeer
    replied
    Aw poop! More competition? I'm getting tired of all of these people with successful careers in other fields, suddenly revealing that they can also draw really well. I studied long and hard to... er... actually I got grade C GCSE, and then gave up, but it's the principle that counts... er... :(

    When we read books/texts in class, many teachers, quite independent of each other gave me the pompous father/vicar roles... I was also Friar Laurence in our school's production of Rome and Juliet. I dread to think what all that says about me.

    Leave a comment:


  • PsychicWarVeteran
    replied
    Pratchett really ought not worry about Rowling. The man has far more talent (in my opinion).

    To wit, how many people knew that he is also a rather good illustrator?

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by pinkgreen
    I had to read all the male parts.
    I'm sure you also know that in Shakespeare's day all the female parts would have been spoken by men as well? Sounds like you got off a bit lightly (although there aren't that many female roles in some/most of Shakespeare's plays iirc).

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  • pinkgreen
    replied
    I was the only male studying English in my last year of High School. Just me and about eight girls. We studied six Shakespeare plays, all of which had to be read aloud. I had to read all the male parts. That’s a lot of reading aloud! I’ve never read Shakespeare since.

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  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by Mikey_C
    I mean - Shakespeare excelled at many forms, but the graphic novel was not one of them![/i]
    Actually, graphic novels are one of the things that Shakespeare can do really rather well - certainly far better than conventional novelists. Think about it, all Shakespeare really is is dialogue. Having gone through the UK education system some 15-20 years ago, I have to say that I think one of the most nonsensical things about teaching Shakespeare is the incessant insistant on sitting in the classroom reading the texts. Shakespeare is not meant to be read, but to be seen. I mean, you wouldn't read the script to something like, say, Once Upon a Time in the West (particularly the opening 10 mins) in preference to watching the actual film. There is merit in studying a text after you've seen the play, but all too often in my experience its done the other way around.

    Leave a comment:


  • devilchicken
    replied
    Originally posted by Mikey_C
    It's sheer snobbery we're talking about here, from the Sunday Colour Supplement sect. Makes you sick, really. But, on another level, who gives a poo?

    If I had gone to Uni when I was supposed to (instead of 20 years later), it would have been to study English Literature. I'm fairly relieved I didn't.

    Making a living out of interpreting the work of others seems vaguely vampiric in itself. But it was probably better not to have made that point!
    My reading list at university for my 'liberature appreciation class' was noticeable for its complete lack of science fiction or fantasy literature. I still have to wonder exactly WHO it is who decides exactly what has literary value and what doesn't - Graham Swift's 'Waterland' quite honestly had to be the most tedious book I ever read, not to mention all that pretentious rubbish by the likes of Salman Rushdie.

    It's certainly the case that the best sci-fi/fantasy has just as much social / political commentary as the 'best 19th-20th century literature', if not more so. Snobberry is right...

    Leave a comment:


  • Mikey_C
    replied
    Originally posted by Jules
    a difference he found between many genre and literary readers, is that genre readers were often people who'd escape into reading from early on in life, while readers of literary fiction had come to reading through English Literature education. I don't know if there's any truth in that . . .
    I remember smuggling Asimov novels into English Lit. classes at school and read them under the desk whilst the teacher droned about Shakespeare an Thomas Hardy. I can appreciate the 'classics' now - but that type of education just put me off.

    Hopefully things have improved somewhat nowadays, but forcefeeding the Bard still seems to be on the agenda. A 'Special School' teacher I know says they have to give the kids with learning disabilities comic-book versions of Shakespeare plays in order to 'tick the boxes' for the National Curriculum...

    I mean - Shakespeare excelled at many forms, but the graphic novel was not one of them![/i]

    Leave a comment:


  • Yisselda
    replied
    It would be better if J K Rowling had been interviewed by a person from a fantasy magazine.

    I think she is powerfully full of the muses. I dont think she even remembers some of what she did.

    Media twits like their catagories.

    I hate hype. It makes good booksget bad publicity. In your face everywhere, on tv, mags, whatever. Theres always freaks who will jump on any bandwagon.

    All types should be promoted equally. It is insulting to the rest to say one is better than others.

    Overhyped stuff makes me wanna turn away and ignore it. Or if i dont like it, hurt it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jules
    replied
    The PKD thing is very much the case in point (you will find PKD, Vonnegut and Ballard in the mainstream literature sections of UK chains like Waterstones).

    He is painted as a noble exception, when at least 70% of his published material - the early short stories - are pulp SF.

    There's an interesting book whose title I can't recall ('The Child that books made'??) that is about the childhood influence on reading - the author (an SF fan) noted that a difference he found between many genre and literary readers, is that genre readers were often people who'd escape into reading from early on in life, while readers of literary fiction had come to reading through English Literature education. I don't know if there's any truth in that . . .

    Leave a comment:


  • Mikey_C
    replied
    Originally posted by DeeCrowSeer
    I had a lecturer at university who tried to imply that Phlip K. Dick wasn't a science-fiction author! He also marked down a story I wrote, because it had people who thought they were vampires in it, and therefore it was only worth sending to "genre" magazines... or maybe he just marke it down because it was rubbish? Either way, he was wrong about PKD.
    It's sheer snobbery we're talking about here, from the Sunday Colour Supplement sect. Makes you sick, really. But, on another level, who gives a poo?

    If I had gone to Uni when I was supposed to (instead of 20 years later), it would have been to study English Literature. I'm fairly relieved I didn't.

    Making a living out of interpreting the work of others seems vaguely vampiric in itself. But it was probably better not to have made that point!

    Leave a comment:


  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    Then there's Kazuo Ishiguro, author of The Remains of the Day, and his recently published, Never Let Me Go, a book about a community of clones, raised to be harvested for organ 'donations'. Science fiction, or mainstream literature? And, haven't we been here before?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ant
    replied
    Originally posted by Jules
    ...the likes of 1984 and Brave New World aren't regarded by most people as SF - SF is the stuff left over when you take out all the 'literature'. ...
    And the corollary, that when mainstream authors write something that is "clearly" science fiction, they deny that it is... Margaret Atwood declining her Arthur C. Clarke award, for example.

    Or a counter-corollary, that when mainstream authors write something that is "clearly" science fiction, they're fأ?ted for producing something "different" when it's really humdrum by genre standards... O-Zone by Paul Theroux, for example.

    Doris Lessing would be an example of one of the few "literary" authors who embrace sf.

    Cheers,
    Ant

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