Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

This Immortal

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • This Immortal

    A book crossed my hands at work today. Roger Zelazny's 'This Immortal' - looked fairly interesting. Can anyone reccommend it?
    Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

    Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

  • #2
    Original title was "...And Call Me Conrad." It was his first novel (1965) and it won him his first Hugo Award.

    It's pretty nicely written, but a bit jerky. Novelistic pacing was something Zelazny struggled with at this age, and his novels tend to use quick-as-quicksilver, short story or novella pacing , with the aforementioned herky-jerky results. It's got a very intentional deus ex machina (for reasons which should become obvious), but even accounting for the sly use of the "mythic" device, I found some of the plot resolutions a bit artificial.

    The characters are entertaining (a Zelazny strength), but there are a few stock characters, too.

    The book is a mixed bag, but I like it. For some reason, it feels very much of its time. When I read it, I'm back in 1965-66 or so. Strange feeling.

    LSN

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the heads-up. I might take a look once I'm done revisiting Orwell.
      Batman: It's a low neighborhood, full of rumpots. They're used to curious sights, which they attribute to alcoholic delusions.

      Robin: Gosh, drink is sure a filthy thing, isn't it? I'd rather be dead than unable to trust my own eyes!

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, Adlerian, you remember correctly.

        I liked the story a lot when I read it as a pre-teen. Later, as an awareness developed of its eccentricities, I retained my liking for it. I noticed that Robert Silverberg thinks highly of this book, too.

        It's use of mythology-as-sf was an interesting device that he and a few others (e.g., Delany) played with back then.

        LSN

        Comment

        Working...
        X