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Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
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  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Much obliged, Paul! On the same site readers will find a bunch of stuff I'm recommending from the past year's reading, along with recommendations from a number of other authors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul
    replied
    For Mike's convenience;

    http://www.fantasticmetropolis.com/show.html?ey,peake,1

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Peake, of course. There should be at least one piece by me about Peake online somewhere! Probably Fantastic Metropolis. If there isn't a piece up somewhere, let me know and I'll get one together.

    Leave a comment:


  • ColdHeat
    replied
    I am reading 'Perdido Street Station' (at the moment) by China Mielville.

    Have you ever read the "Gormenghast" triology by Mervyn Peake.

    One of the best literary series that I have ever read!! 8) 8) 8)

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Yeah, Camus. I recently reread a few and they are as good as ever.
    Also, for non fiction, Walter Benjamin. Almost anything by him.
    And there's always my favourite Elizabeth Bowen, if you just want some good, straight literary fiction. She also writes a nifty supernatural story every so often. All currently available. My favourite remains The Death of the Heart.
    And Kafka would be another good choice, if you haven't read him yet.
    And I'll always recommend a Beckett novel, if you're in the mood for a
    very offbeat mindset.
    Iain Sinclair, too -- Downriver, if you want some London evocation.

    Leave a comment:


  • L'Etranger
    replied
    "L'Etranger"... now that you mention it.

    This year I got hold of "Life of Pi" by Yann Martel, absolutely wonderful story, won't let you go until you're through.

    L'E

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul
    replied
    Camus.

    Most people say L'estranger, but personally I find La Chute's Jean Baptiste Clemente to be a more intelligent and likable protoganist than Mersault. His essays are also exceptional too.

    Leave a comment:


  • lordmarioh
    replied
    Hey bob, If youآ´d like to read something reaaly new, why don't you try "The Postumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas" by the gratest brazilian writer ever: Machado de Assis...

    It's a great book... One of my favorites ever... And if you like this, also read "Dom Casmurro" by the same writer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob
    replied
    Thankyou both!

    I have plenty to delve into now :D

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I can't do better than to direct you to Guardian.co.uk and the Books Section you'll find there. From there go to the Science Fiction genre section and you'll find much of the fantasy I've been recommending lately. Classics as well as contemporary stuff.
    If you just check my name out, you'll find work other than sf I've reviewed.
    I've also done a recommended reading roundup for Fantastic Metropolis
    which you can easily reach from here.
    I'm currently reading K.L.Bishop's The Etched City, which I'll be reviewing for the Guardian soon. Very good indeed. Also Zoran Zivkovic's work. Discussion of this writer, plus examples of his work,
    can also be found at the FM site, and much of his short fiction has been published in Interzone in recent years.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarvingArtist
    replied
    Well, being unsure of your past reading... I'll definately start by saying all of M.M.'s books I've read have been a delight, so always stick with that of course! But some other good books that I've read as of late have been, Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. Good Omens was a HILARIOUS read, and had me laughing at every page turn, I've been lending it to friends and they blast through it just as quickly as I did. I also recently purchased a motorcycle and ended up reading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenence, another wondeful read, although for some it may appear to be too deep and philosophical to be enjoyable, but its really given me some food for thought. With the new interest in Buddhism from the previous book, I have gone on to read Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac, a story about americas most famous Beat poet living as a zen lunatic in the mountains of north west Oregon and Washington state.
    Some old favorites of mine also include Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut, 100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, books by Hunter S. Thompson and all the while our buddy M.M.'s extensive collection of course. *(Which is usually the focus of my reading efforts as of late)

    I hope this little overview can be of some help to you, I like to read in many different genres and styles, so my taste may not be anything like yours, but the books I listed were all very good none the less. Good luck with finding a good read!

    Kyle B.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob
    started a topic Recommendations...

    Recommendations...

    When it comes to going into a book store, I must say that I have no idea what I'm looking for. So many descriptions sound so similar on all of the books sat next to eachother. It seems to me that most are just constant re-tellings of previous stories.
    On this note, can anyone recommend anything to me that would stand out as a truly memorable or wildly original read?

    Literature has much in common with music, in my opinion, as you have to put up with a lot of crap before you get to the quality. Any help in pointing me toward my goal would be appreciated.

    :D
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