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Ray Bradbury

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  • #16
    Originally posted by devilchicken
    Robert E Howard hated cats too - he wrote an essay on the subject.
    I don't know why people hate cats unless there big ones. Dogs on the other hand, I've been bitten twice one was " a friendly one" or so the owner told me untill he bit me. The other one I had a fair idea who owned it but I had no proof and I was only 10 years old, so no one believed me. :(

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    • #17
      My favorite Bradbury novel is The Halloween Tree. A relatively short read, and is a lyrical descent into the history of Samhain. Pippin is lost, taken, and guided by the wraith Moundshroud, his costumed friends chase him across regional and temporal celebrations of Halloween. My favorite scene is that of the druids. Vintage Bradbury and an underrated classic. A lovely child's bedtime story.

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      • #18
        I find it odd that some consider him Minor, but each measure finds its own.

        Everything I have read by him has only been good, if somewhat alien to my experience in this country, given the difference in decades and geography. Howeverm when I visited my relatives in Indiana, I began to see how relevant his writing was to the American collection.

        His connection to the older Anglo-Saxon ways and their trace observances in our mis-aligned Memorial Day and Halloween was very refreshing, given his very genteel and 19th century-esque nature.

        The story from the Chronicles that was referenced earlier in the discussion is among my faves by him, as is The Musicians (Usher ][, and ...).

        I thought he was a staple. Perhaps I'm showing my age.
        Ani Maamin B'emunah Sh'leimah B'viyat Hamashiach. V'af al pi sheyitmahmehah im kol zeh achake lo b'chol yom sheyavo.

        "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." - Phillip K. Dick

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        • #19
          I still think he is a staple Kyrinn.
          He has been one of the authors who when im coming around to reading him again i cant wait!
          Just re-read A Graveyard for Lunatics recently and loved every minute!
          If i had to be pushed to name a favourite mmm,i think i would have to opt for Something Wicked This Way Comes
          "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

          Hunter S Thompson

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          • #20
            I bought that for myself this past holiday season and haven't gotten around to reading it.

            I remember the movie; pretty spooky at the time when I saw it in the theatre; it was a big influence on my writing. It should be fun seeing how much more there is to the novel.
            Last edited by Kyrinn S. Eis; 02-26-2008, 06:12 PM. Reason: complete sentences, doofus!
            Ani Maamin B'emunah Sh'leimah B'viyat Hamashiach. V'af al pi sheyitmahmehah im kol zeh achake lo b'chol yom sheyavo.

            "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." - Phillip K. Dick

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            • #21
              Originally posted by thingfish View Post
              If i had to be pushed to name a favourite mmm,i think i would have to opt for Something Wicked This Way Comes
              I mentioned the same thing earlier in this thread (although it was some years ago). It is the story that made me understand the word sinister. Really.

              Kyrinn, I loved the movie, too. It may still be the scariest film I've ever seen that was not rated R. I would be interested to see if I still think that...

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              • #22
                I think they succeeded very well in creating an ominous tone to the movie, while still reining-in raw horror for its target-group audience of the younger folk. I think I was perhaps fifteen?

                I want to see it again, now, too!
                Ani Maamin B'emunah Sh'leimah B'viyat Hamashiach. V'af al pi sheyitmahmehah im kol zeh achake lo b'chol yom sheyavo.

                "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." - Phillip K. Dick

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Kyrinn S. Eis View Post
                  I think they succeeded very well in creating an ominous tone to the movie, while still reining-in raw horror for its target-group audience of the younger folk. I think I was perhaps fifteen?

                  I want to see it again, now, too!
                  I was about the same age when I saw it. I had really started losing some of my innocence in small town America, and about small town America , so it was a perfect age to se it. Carnivals, in particular, had just begun to lose their mysteries for me. This is a bit sad now that I think about it, as the carnival pulling into my small hometown was a definitive event of summer. The movie reminded me of all of the possibilities that I once imagined carnivals had. I wonder if I still have that in me.

                  I think I will have to go to the video store this weekend.

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                  • #24
                    Essentially the same for me.

                    Heck, I think I'll buy the DVD if I find it.
                    Ani Maamin B'emunah Sh'leimah B'viyat Hamashiach. V'af al pi sheyitmahmehah im kol zeh achake lo b'chol yom sheyavo.

                    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." - Phillip K. Dick

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Doc View Post
                      It may still be the scariest film I've ever seen that was not rated R.
                      It's amazing that Walt Disney(!) would have made the scariest film you've ever seen that was not rated R. I last saw it a few years ago and it's still a very powerful film imo. Probably one of the best live action films Disney's ever made.
                      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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                      • #26
                        I had no idea that the movie was made by Disney!
                        Way above their usual standard,a fantastic movie which i actually saw before i read the book unusually.
                        "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                        Hunter S Thompson

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
                          It's amazing that Walt Disney(!) would have made the scariest film you've ever seen that was not rated R.
                          ! is right. I had forgotten it was a Disney film.

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