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The Iron Dream

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  • #16
    Found the Iron Dream raised a chuckle, but read Wells The Food of the Gods (1905) within the last few years. Genetically made (by accident) giant men (and women) take over the world from the 'small' people to create a better society. Wonder if there was an early German edition?
    Papa was a Rolling Stone......

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    • #17
      I've just read Ursula Le Guin's review of The Iron Dream. Pithy, much as I expected of her.

      Yes, I've read The Iron Dream myself.

      About the sequel as written by Dubbya, just remember his language resonates with his intense religious convictions:

      There! In the document by failing to be.

      "When you can generalizating a kind of 1984 in almost of us, at render language that hardware went on, you find that Getely Harmer, a co-founder look instantly to the Denunch Coney, engaging in a computer."

      Vere de Vere out of my mould's mouth, dragged me of the voluntary apes. She young woman being and trying uselessible.

      Much later, such lift. And his given me, so I supposes? Invoiced ho, what it is she's got against you, do you know?

      Behold, I will righteous shat mine elders as commandments. These were the seven as to Abraham, at his reasoning with Jacobation, and that were Mosiah, and he could not be saved, for he feared them all.
      Last edited by In_Loos_Ptokai; 12-11-2014, 01:19 AM.
      sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

      Gold is the power of a man with a man
      And incense the power of man with God
      But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
      And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

      Nativity,
      by Peter Cape

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Governor of Rowe Island View Post
        I stuggled with Bug Jack Barron and couldn't finish it.
        I found Bug Jack Barron easier to read than The Iron Dream. There are parts where I am reminded of Black Like Me, which is another of those books I was given to read at school, but failed to write any essay on, because I got too wrapped up in following the events and trying to picture myself in the writer's shoes.
        sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

        Gold is the power of a man with a man
        And incense the power of man with God
        But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
        And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

        Nativity,
        by Peter Cape

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by In_Loos_Ptokai View Post
          I've just read Ursula Le Guin's review of The Iron Dream. Pithy, much as I expected of her.

          Yes, I've read The Iron Dream myself.

          ...
          Thanks for that! A very timely reminder.

          Of course, Le Guin isn't a man, so she couldn't read The Iron Dream as a man would. I read it, as a young man, after reading a fair bit of Sword & Fantasy and SF, so I was primed to find it a bit of revelation. It was quite possible to suspend one's disbelief, whilst constantly being pulled up short, whenever the extra-textual context would throw some little scene of phallus worship, authoritarianism, totalitarianism, misogyny, misanthropy, racism, or genocide, into sharp relief, revealing it very clearly for what it was.

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          • #20
            Spinrad's work is always worth getting into - love Bug Jack Baron and The Iron Dream - Agent of Chaos is also worth reading.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
              Originally posted by In_Loos_Ptokai View Post
              I've just read Ursula Le Guin's review of The Iron Dream. Pithy, much as I expected of her.

              Yes, I've read The Iron Dream myself.

              ...
              Thanks for that! A very timely reminder.

              Of course, Le Guin isn't a man, so she couldn't read The Iron Dream as a man would. I read it, as a young man, after reading a fair bit of Sword & Fantasy and SF, so I was primed to find it a bit of revelation. It was quite possible to suspend one's disbelief, whilst constantly being pulled up short, whenever the extra-textual context would throw some little scene of phallus worship, authoritarianism, totalitarianism, misogyny, misanthropy, racism, or genocide, into sharp relief, revealing it very clearly for what it was.
              The (most central) feminist "reply" to S&S and Fantasy is Joanna Russ' The Tales of Alyx, which I read a fair few years before I happened upon The Iron Dream. She parodies among others, Fritz Leiber, and is very funny.
              sigpic Myself as Mephistopheles (Karen Koed's painting of me, 9 Nov 2008, U of Canterbury, CHCH, NZ)

              Gold is the power of a man with a man
              And incense the power of man with God
              But myrrh is the bitter taste of death
              And the sour-sweet smell of the upturned sod,

              Nativity,
              by Peter Cape

              Comment

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