Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

J.G Ballard

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The English Assassin
    replied
    Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
    Originally posted by The English Assassin View Post
    ...really wondered on what basis the Guardian commissioned the piece - it seems to have no point whatsoever!
    Sadly, these days, this seems to apply to 90% of the articles on The Guardian website. I guess that's what happens when 'Comment Is Free'.
    I couldn't agree more. I'm afraid that myself and the Guardian have all but parted company - I prefer both the 'i' and the Independent (depending on how poor/rich I'm feeling) these days on the rare occasion I want to buy a news paper, as the Guardian has become a vacuous rag of endless editorials and opinion pieces by desperate hipster journos. Also, it has seriously priced itself out of my budget. In fairness its still the most user-friendly online paper (and still free!!!). Sadly, I hear that the Guardian has been in serious financial difficulties in recent years, although I doubt its alone in this regard.

    Leave a comment:


  • David Mosley
    replied
    Originally posted by The English Assassin View Post
    ...really wondered on what basis the Guardian commissioned the piece - it seems to have no point whatsoever!
    Sadly, these days, this seems to apply to 90% of the articles on The Guardian website. I guess that's what happens when 'Comment Is Free'.

    Leave a comment:


  • The English Assassin
    replied
    Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post

    Bit too much stuff about SF foretelling the future. Does this Amis chap actually get SF, or Ballard?
    Aye, Amis is an idiot. I read this a wee while ago and really wondered on what basis the Guardian commissioned the piece - it seems to have no point whatsoever!

    Leave a comment:


  • In_Loos_Ptokai
    replied
    Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post
    Martin Amis review of JG Ballard's early novel, The Drowned World.
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012...ld-martin-amis


    The Drowned World by JG Ballard

    The sun is so close it's noisy, and London is under water – welcome to JG Ballard's vision of the future, written 50 years ago. Martin Amis pays tribute to a bold, hypnotic novel, by an author with a genius for the perverse

    guardian.co.uk, Martin Amis. 13 July 2012

    Is prescience a literary virtue? And should the work of JG Ballard be particularly prized (as some critics maintain) for the "uncanny" accuracy of its forecasts? The answer to both these questions, I suggest, is a cheerful no.

    In The Atrocity Exhibition (1970) Ballard famously tapped Ronald Reagan for president. His Hello America (1981), on the other hand, surmised that the United States in its entirety would be evacuated by 1990. The meteorological cataclysms envisaged by his first four novels still look plausible. But the social crisis envisaged by his last four novels – violent and widespread anomie brought about by a glut of leisure and wealth – now looks vanishingly remote.

    So here's a prophecy: fictional divination will always be hopelessly haphazard. The unfolding of world-historical events is itself haphazard (and therefore unaesthetic), and "the future" is in a sense defined by its messy inscrutability. Besides, the art of fiction owes allegiance to a muse, a goddess as pure as her nine sisters, and not to some bustling Madame Sosostris (Eliot's "famous clairvoyant", with her "wicked pack of cards"). Nevertheless there are certain writers whose visionary power is indifferent to the corroboration of mere upshots – writers who seem to be able to feel, and use, the "world hum" of the "near-after". That first quote is from Don DeLillo, who is one such; the second quote is from James Graham Ballard (1930-2009), who is another.

    ...
    Rest at link.

    Bit too much stuff about SF foretelling the future. Does this Amis chap actually get SF, or Ballard?

    Good thing he's a 'serious' writer and doesn't do SF.
    Pussy cat, pussy cat, where have you been?
    I've been to London to visit the Queen.
    Pussy cat, pussy cat, what did you there?
    I drowned. The Greenland icecap gave way, and so did the tide gates, and I was swept out to sea minus the peagreen boat and the Owl ...
    Last edited by In_Loos_Ptokai; 09-16-2012, 03:29 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    Martin Amis review of JG Ballard's early novel, The Drowned World.
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012...ld-martin-amis


    The Drowned World by JG Ballard

    The sun is so close it's noisy, and London is under water – welcome to JG Ballard's vision of the future, written 50 years ago. Martin Amis pays tribute to a bold, hypnotic novel, by an author with a genius for the perverse

    guardian.co.uk, Martin Amis. 13 July 2012

    Is prescience a literary virtue? And should the work of JG Ballard be particularly prized (as some critics maintain) for the "uncanny" accuracy of its forecasts? The answer to both these questions, I suggest, is a cheerful no.

    In The Atrocity Exhibition (1970) Ballard famously tapped Ronald Reagan for president. His Hello America (1981), on the other hand, surmised that the United States in its entirety would be evacuated by 1990. The meteorological cataclysms envisaged by his first four novels still look plausible. But the social crisis envisaged by his last four novels – violent and widespread anomie brought about by a glut of leisure and wealth – now looks vanishingly remote.

    So here's a prophecy: fictional divination will always be hopelessly haphazard. The unfolding of world-historical events is itself haphazard (and therefore unaesthetic), and "the future" is in a sense defined by its messy inscrutability. Besides, the art of fiction owes allegiance to a muse, a goddess as pure as her nine sisters, and not to some bustling Madame Sosostris (Eliot's "famous clairvoyant", with her "wicked pack of cards"). Nevertheless there are certain writers whose visionary power is indifferent to the corroboration of mere upshots – writers who seem to be able to feel, and use, the "world hum" of the "near-after". That first quote is from Don DeLillo, who is one such; the second quote is from James Graham Ballard (1930-2009), who is another.

    ...
    Rest at link.

    Bit too much stuff about SF foretelling the future. Does this Amis chap actually get SF, or Ballard?

    Good thing he's a 'serious' writer and doesn't do SF.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    We have to thank Greg Dyke, former DG of the BBC, for his foresight in modernising the BBC extensively and rapidly. Not all his changes were popular (including with me) but he did so much better than his predecessor. Might be I would never have left Britain if it hadn't have been for John thingy (name escapes me as usual) who was caught fiddling his income tax returns. Not him, but the fact that the inland revenue guys who'd given me so much trouble over mistakes they acknowledged were innocent were laughing about it the morning of my final show-down with them. That is, they were amused that he hadn't followed the usual procedures for falsifying his returns. They knew no moral outrage. I lost it... After all, it was my license fee that was paying his wages!
    Never regretted it, either. Still can't remember the smarmy bugger's name.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dead-Air
    replied
    Cool, that's really a nice thing to have handy, thanks! I guess I should've figured you'd have the link since you're listening from Austin and all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/

    You'll then be able to go to Radio Seven and find out a complete list of what's on. You can click on 'Listen Again' to get the archived material.
    The Ballard isn't due out until, I think, next Friday.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dead-Air
    replied
    Anybody know if any of that stuff is streaming or saved as MP3s somewhere?

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    They're reading a Ballard story on 7th Dimension -- the Radio Seven sf and fantasy programme. You can also hear C.S.Lewis's Perelandra, Gibson's Burning Chrome and a whole lot of other stuff!

    Leave a comment:


  • PsychicWarVeteran
    replied
    Ha! Yeah, I thought about calling you back and simply saying "Thanks, Lapis" and then hanging up. :D

    Leave a comment:


  • Whiskers
    replied
    Kirk,

    I did just make a post. I had forgotten. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Whiskers
    replied
    Thanks lapis

    Leave a comment:


  • lapis
    replied
    Arthur website

    Arthur website at:

    http://www.arthurmag.com/news/

    Looks like you can view issues as PDF files.

    --lapis

    Leave a comment:


  • Pietro_Mercurios
    replied
    Originally posted by Berry Sizemore
    Mike,

    How can we get a hold on a copy of ARTHUR?

    ...
    I was wondering that too? :)

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X