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Stanislaw Lem & Kobo Abe other non-US sci-fi/fantasy wri

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  • Stanislaw Lem & Kobo Abe other non-US sci-fi/fantasy wri

    I was wondering if anyone else has read Stanislaw Lem books, not just Solaris, but his other works. I was just re-reading "The Star Diaries" and "Cyberiad" and "Tales of Pirx the Pilot" and found some interesting parallels to MM's Cornelius series. Lem also wrote a facinating analytical essay about the state of Science Fiction in the collection "Microworlds". He wrote it in 1973, but it is still valid today.

    I also have been reading Kobo Abe, a Japanese author, who is particularly good at surrealist fantasy. BoxMan, Woman in the Dunes, Secret Rendezvous and (still my fav) Inter IceAge 4.

    What other non-US sf/f writers do people particularly like?

  • #2
    Re: Stanislaw Lem & Kobo Abe other non-US sci-fi/fantasy

    Originally posted by Zoxesyr
    I was wondering if anyone else has read Stanislaw Lem books, not just Solaris, but his other works. I was just re-reading "The Star Diaries" and "Cyberiad" and "Tales of Pirx the Pilot" and found some interesting parallels to MM's Cornelius series. Lem also wrote a facinating analytical essay about the state of Science Fiction in the collection "Microworlds". He wrote it in 1973, but it is still valid today.

    I also have been reading Kobo Abe, a Japanese author, who is particularly good at surrealist fantasy. BoxMan, Woman in the Dunes, Secret Rendezvous and (still my fav) Inter IceAge 4.

    What other non-US sf/f writers do people particularly like?
    I've read a fair amount of Lem, including all the books you listed above. A few other books of his from my shelves: The Futurological Congress, The Investigation, Memoirs Found in a Bathtub, and Mortal Engines. An interesting writer, but not always to my taste.

    The only things by Kobo Abe I've read are the aforementioned Woman in the Dunes (from which a curious movie was made) and Inter IceAge 4. It has been a while -- maybe 30 years. :?

    As for sf/f not written in English, what about Italo Calvino? Invisible Cities and Cosmicomics and (one of my favorites) The Watcher and other stories.

    LSN

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    • #3
      Re: Stanislaw Lem & Kobo Abe other non-US sci-fi/fantasy

      Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
      I've read a fair amount of Lem, including all the books you listed above. A few other books of his from my shelves: The Futurological Congress, The Investigation, Memoirs Found in a Bathtub, and Mortal Engines. An interesting writer, but not always to my taste.
      I always thought The Investigation would make a great Wes Craven film because it was so creepy. Mortal Engines was more a collection of essays than stories. I did like The Invincible, and Fiasco is particularly good.

      Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
      The only things by Kobo Abe I've read are the aforementioned Woman in the Dunes (from which a curious movie was made) and Inter IceAge 4. It has been a while -- maybe 30 years. :?
      I haven't seen the movie, I'll have to check it out.

      Originally posted by L_Stearns_Newburg
      As for sf/f not written in English, what about Italo Calvino? Invisible Cities and Cosmicomics and (one of my favorites) The Watcher and other stories.
      Thanks for the tip! 8)

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      • #4
        I think there are not so many authors who has the typical characteristics of English written SF or they aren't translated. However, Strugatskis can be thought as classical SF writers.

        I can give more examples for fantasy like Borges, Calvino, Pavic, Hoffman, Kafka. Like SF, they didn't write the way we have our minds nowadays when we talk about fantasy genre. I mean, they didn't write about dragons, swords, sorcery. But I don't think it's wrong to explain "Verwandlung" with the words "fantastic literature".

        Btw, I'm reading If On A Winter's Night (I'm not sure if it's translated into English with this title; direct translation from the Turkish one). I don't know how the weather is like there , but it's snowing here and the book goes very good with the snowy and stormy weather.
        http://soundandclouds.blogspot.com/

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        • #5
          I bought We by Yevgeny Zamatyin the other day - haven't got round to reading it yet, but supposed to be superb.

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