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Why isn't this around?

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  • Conrad
    Denizen of Moo Uria
    • Mar 2012
    • 188

    Why isn't this around?

    Just a quick question for you all.
    I've just discovered Harold Lamb Cossack series and find the readying much to my liking.

    I am quite sure that there are many other authors out there equally as good but not available anymore so I ask you:

    Which out of print series would you like to see back in print and why?


    Thanks for reading.
    Sincerely,
    Conrad
  • Pietro_Mercurios
    Eternal Champion
    • Oct 2004
    • 5746

    #2
    As far as I know, the works of Maurice Walsh, have been out of print for a while. My grandfather used to really enjoy them and I've read a few. Manly romances, like Westerns, set on the Celtic fringes of Scotland and Ireland. Fists instead of six guns. No accident that one of the best known, The Quiet Man, was made into a film by John Ford, starring, John Wayne, Maureen O'Sullivan, Barry Fitzgerald and Victor McGlaglen, amongst others.

    I'd happily read them again.

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    • David Mosley
      Eternal Administrator
      • Jul 2004
      • 11823

      #3
      Trevor Hoyle's 'Q' Series [trilogy really] would get my vote, likewise Henry Treece's 'Celtic Tetralogy' - The Golden Strangers, The Dark Island, Red Queen, White Queen and The Great Captains - has been OOP I believe since the Savoy Books editions were published in the early '80s.
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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      • Kymba334
        Eternal Champion
        • Jun 2011
        • 3149

        #4
        Moderan and other tales by David R. Bunch is my pick for out of print writers although it seems that most of what I like to read is getting hard to find. Bunch was one of my favorite speculative fiction writers and a real inspiration to me, a black humorist of the highest order. This ought to be famous writer has not had his work reprinted since 1997. He died around the turn of the millennium.
        Last edited by Kymba334; 10-14-2013, 02:28 PM. Reason: more to add
        Mwana wa simba ni simba

        The child of a lion is also a lion - Swahili Wisdom

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        • opaloka
          digital serf 41221z/74
          • Jun 2006
          • 3746

          #5
          The fantasies of H. Warner Munn. I haven't read the werewolf stories but I bet they're pretty good.

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          • Chris T
            Defender of the Runestaff
            • Jan 2009
            • 304

            #6
            Seeing as I just enjoyed The Walrus and the Warwolf, I'd say Hugh Cook's fantasy series (although I did find the first three—of ten—in a second hand bookshop the other day).

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