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Stuff you read when you were a kid that you aren't into now

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  • Stuff you read when you were a kid that you aren't into now

    Who are some authors you read when you started out that you wouldn't read now?

    for me, off the top of my head:

    Terry Brooks
    Raymond Feist

  • #2
    I read Mists Of Avalon, not sure If I would read it again. For quite sometime I thought I would not read Agatha Christie anymore as I did when I was a kid, but these days I have only fond memories. Perhaps, I would not read Orson Scott Card again, but I read him when I was 21.
    "From time to time I demonstrate the inconceivable, or mock the innocent, or give truth to liars, or shred the poses of virtue.(...) Now I am silent; this is my mood." From Sundrun's Garden, Jack Vance.
    "As the Greeks have created the Olympus based upon their own image and resemblance, we have created Gotham City and Metropolis and all these galaxies so similar to the corporate world, manipulative, ruthless and well paid, that conceived them." Braulio Tavares.

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    • #3
      Doctor Who Target novelizations; I used to read these all the time in the '70s and early '80s when they were the only way to experience old adventures or re-experience ones you'd recently seen - three in one day was my record - but although I still have all but one of the first five doctors' (published) novelizations I find them all but unreadable now. Maybe its because I've since seen or heard all those old stories for myself now?

      I read a ton of fantasy novels in my teens that I wouldn't read again, mostly because reading them once was enough; no names, no pack drill - but you can probably guess who they were. (Oddly Howard and Leiber were never among that coterie. Who knows, maybe one day I will read them. )

      More recently Terry Pratchett used to be a much-loved author in my 20s/30s but since giving up on Jingo a quarter of the way in I've not read another word of his and haven't acquired any novels since The Night Watch. I think Terry just got too prolific and mainstream for my wallet/tastes.
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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      • #4
        As i've mentioned elsewhere i was a late starter but one authors books i kind of liked back then was Piers Anthony but i tried to read one of his books that i liked a wee while back and thought it was pants.
        Pretty much the same with Poul Anderson and Anne McCaffrey.
        "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

        Hunter S Thompson

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        • #5
          David, I read a good number of the Targets too and still have a box of them. I'm sure I'll never read them again. Why do you have all but one? I'd have to get that one just to finish it out even if I wasn't going to read it!

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          • #6
            I picked up my DW Targets during the '70s & '80s when they were originally published but by the time I started using eBay to plug the (many) gaps in my collection in the early '00s the one book I'm missing, The Wheel in Space, was going for silly money, £60+! Even today you're looking at the best part of £20+ (at least) for a copy. For something I was never going to read it wasn't/isn't worth it.
            _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
            _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
            _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
            _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

            Comment


            • #7
              Cities in Flight by Blish. It was one of the only SF novels in my school library, so I read it again and again. But the things that bugged me then are what stayed in my mind (building up a sympathetic character and then having his friends put him to death for a blunder off stage, in fact most of the action was off stage, and the stage was pretty bare).

              I was into Asimov big time as a youngster. Not sure I'd bother going back now. And of course there were the De Camp/Carter/Nyborg Conan pastiches. Nope, never again.
              Dave Hardy
              http://fireandsword.blogspot.com/

              My books: Crazy Greta, Tales of Phalerus the Achaean, and Palmetto Empire.

              sigpic

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              • #8
                David, the cheapest you can get it in the states is $20. That's pretty ridiculous. But it would drive me crazy to have one left.

                DH, I've read a lot of De Camp but I'm not sure his Conan would be the thing I picked to re-read. Lin Carter is Lin Carter. I like him OK. I'd probably read those guys before I read any of the newer pastiches which don't even try for Howard's feel.

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                • #9
                  I suppose I don't read much of what I read as a kid, because I mainly read new books than re=read old ones, but that doesn't mean I'm seriously embarrassed of my past tastes or anything. I guess the main genre or form I no longer read to any extent is comics. I'm just out of the habit these days. I end up reading them like novels and just ripping through them and feeling dissatisfied with them. When I was young I used to read and re-read them, losing myself in the art... I just don't do that as an adult. It's not a fault of comics per se, just I have changed. I'm sure there's still many good comics tho...
                  forum

                  1. a meeting or assembly for the open discussion of subjects of public interest
                  2. a medium for open discussion, such as a magazine
                  3. a public meeting place for open discussion

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                  • #10
                    I still read Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman J.M DeMatteis and Will Eisner. Anything else I just don't feel quite motivated. Except, perhaps, I'd read the Hellboy series most definitely. I think I might read the Books of Magics series ( after Jonh Nieber start writing it as a regular series ).

                    I still enjoy the cartoons a lot anyway: Teen Titans, Justice League, Superman, Batman, etc. I rather enjoy them.
                    "From time to time I demonstrate the inconceivable, or mock the innocent, or give truth to liars, or shred the poses of virtue.(...) Now I am silent; this is my mood." From Sundrun's Garden, Jack Vance.
                    "As the Greeks have created the Olympus based upon their own image and resemblance, we have created Gotham City and Metropolis and all these galaxies so similar to the corporate world, manipulative, ruthless and well paid, that conceived them." Braulio Tavares.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Enid Blyton and C.S.Lewis. I mostly read comics when I was a kid (and still do).

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