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NPR Lists top 100 Sci Fi/ Fantasy books/series of all time

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  • NPR Lists top 100 Sci Fi/ Fantasy books/series of all time

    http://www.npr.org/2011/08/11/139085...-fantasy-books

    Our very own fearless leader comes in at # 90
    "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life." -Robert A. Heinlein

    "If I accept you as you are, I will make you worse; however, if I treat you as though you are what you are capable of becoming, I will help you become that." -Johann Wolfgang Goethe

    "Man once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous, and like a ship without rudder, is the sport of every wind." -Thomas Jefferson

  • #2
    There's an existing thread on this list in the Q&A forum.

    Last edited by The Cosmic Balance; 09-05-2011, 08:56 AM.
    The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who, in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is The Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee.

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    • #3
      Ahh! I didn't even think to look there. I put it here as it is a bok thing and not really a question for Mike.

      Thanks.

      It is a pretty good list overall and I have read a good percentage of the books listed.
      "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life." -Robert A. Heinlein

      "If I accept you as you are, I will make you worse; however, if I treat you as though you are what you are capable of becoming, I will help you become that." -Johann Wolfgang Goethe

      "Man once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous, and like a ship without rudder, is the sport of every wind." -Thomas Jefferson

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      • #4
        Pas convaincu.

        I am not fan of this list : Star wars books and not works of Norman Spinrad and Fritz Leiber.
        Papi

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        • #5
          A few of the books and authors on the list didn't even look familiar to me. I'm sure that says something about me.

          Interesting that Gaiman is so well represented (deservedly, IMHO). I agree that the omission of Leiber and Spinrad, amongst others, makes me scratch my head a little.

          Makes me wonder- which is more interesting, whose work was included or whose was not.

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          • #6
            Gene Wolfes book of the new Sun only one place higher than the Star Wars novels??

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Doc View Post
              Interesting that Gaiman is so well represented (deservedly, IMHO).
              .
              what?! American Gods is a better novel than the Time Machine... yet further proof that democracy just does not work! I hate popular lists for this very reason. I'd wager that no critics list would score them that way around...
              forum

              1. a meeting or assembly for the open discussion of subjects of public interest
              2. a medium for open discussion, such as a magazine
              3. a public meeting place for open discussion

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              • #8
                What a weird selection. Some true classics and lots of right trash.

                No Hawkmoon? No Jerry? No Dancers? No Eric Frank Russell? No Alfred Bester? No Pohl and Kornbluth? No James Blish? The Christian SF of CS Lewis makes it and Tolkein makes number one, but where's David Lindsay's, 'Voyage to Arcturus'?

                Neil Gaiman shoul be feeling quite chuffed, though!
                http://www.npr.org/2011/08/11/139085...-fantasy-books

                ...

                A quick word about what's here, and what's not: Our panel of experts reviewed hundreds of the most popular nominations and tossed out those that didn't fit the survey's criteria (after — we assure you — much passionate, thoughtful, gleefully nerdy discussion). You'll notice there are no young adult or horror books on this list, but sit tight, dear reader, we're saving those genres for summers yet to come.

                So, at last, here are your favorite science-fiction and fantasy novels. (And a printable version, to take with you to the bookstore.)
                Would be interested to know what the 'panel of experts' actually threw out.

                No young adult? What's Starship Troopers doing in there, then? Would that also mean, no Andre Norton and no, Wizard of Earthsea? Was it a ruse to keep Harry Potter out? Frankenstein gets in, but no Dracula. Yes it's horror, but it's also a very influential work of fantasy.

                It's the bit about toddling along to the bookshop with the printed out list that does make me wonder. The extended list: http://www.npr.org/2011/08/07/138938...tasy-finalists

                Weird.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by The English Assassin View Post
                  Originally posted by Doc View Post
                  Interesting that Gaiman is so well represented (deservedly, IMHO).
                  .
                  what?! American Gods is a better novel than the Time Machine... yet further proof that democracy just does not work! I hate popular lists for this very reason. I'd wager that no critics list would score them that way around...
                  Ha! I looked at what I wrote, and I find myself unable to disagree with you. I guess what I really should have said is Gaiman certainly should be on the list at least once.

                  Lists like this are fun for me at first. Then they drive me crazy thinking about what they got wrong, rather than what they got right. And I hope all of us agree that Star Wars novels should never, ever be on a list like this.

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                  • #10
                    And Pietro- I also agree that Jerry's absence is glaring.

                    I'm ambivalent about the absence of a lot of young adult stuff, especially at the expense of some things on the list. Having said that, I can think of some very good YA stuff that could have made the list. Especially ahead of Star Wars novels.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doc View Post
                      Originally posted by The English Assassin View Post
                      Originally posted by Doc View Post
                      Interesting that Gaiman is so well represented (deservedly, IMHO).
                      .
                      what?! American Gods is a better novel than the Time Machine... yet further proof that democracy just does not work! I hate popular lists for this very reason. I'd wager that no critics list would score them that way around...
                      Ha! I looked at what I wrote, and I find myself unable to disagree with you. I guess what I really should have said is Gaiman certainly should be on the list at least once.

                      Lists like this are fun for me at first. Then they drive me crazy thinking about what they got wrong, rather than what they got right. And I hope all of us agree that Star Wars novels should never, ever be on a list like this.
                      While I'm not a massive fan of NG, I certainly wouldn't begrudge the guy a listing... he is MASSIVE. Even among those who don't normally stray into the ghetto of the SF/F section...

                      Originally posted by Pietro_Mercurios View Post

                      Frankenstein gets in, but no Dracula. Yes it's horror, but it's also a very influential work of fantasy.
                      I find it weird to include SF and fantasy in a list like this, then not to include horror, which is no less similar as the other two are to each other. But as for Dracula... with the exception of the opening few chapters, it is one of the worst novels I have read - so maybe that's why it didn't get in the mix... It's hardly had a brilliant influence on literature either... especially in the last 20 years...
                      forum

                      1. a meeting or assembly for the open discussion of subjects of public interest
                      2. a medium for open discussion, such as a magazine
                      3. a public meeting place for open discussion

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        After reading this, on the New Statesman site:

                        I read the 100 “best” fantasy and sci-fi novels - and they were shockingly offensive
                        Why are so many of NPR's list of best science fiction books so misogynistic, and why can't we move past our nostalgia for them?


                        by Liz Lutgendorff

                        I had a look through the Your Picks: Top 100 Science-Fiction, Fantasy Books [Summer 2011], over on the NPR site.

                        Admittedly, there does appear to be an awful lot of turgid multi-volume doorstopper dross in there. The Lord of the Rings, is in at N°1, whilst Elric is relegated to N°90. But, did Liz Lutgendorff really read and reject them all? Margaret Atwood's Handmaid's Tale is in there, at N°22, for starters. There's Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (N°20). There's some Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness (N°45) and The Dispossessed (N°78), not at all misogynistic fare. Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series (N°89), with it's main, time travelling, female protagonist, which my daughter has been reading and enjoying and Marion Zimmer Bradley's The Mists of Avalon (N°42), Arthurian legend from the perspective of the women involved. That's just a preliminary glance. Hardly an entirely awful & misogynistic selection.

                        Admittedly, there could be more of a feminist presence. I'd definitely nominate Virginia Woolf's Orlando and Sylvia Townsend Warner's quirky, Lolly Willowes, form my top 100 best SF & Fantasy books, for starters. Two rather fine pioneering works of fantasy, feminist at heart, rather euphemistically described as works of 'satire.'

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                        • #13
                          I was really trying to read this but once she writes

                          However, despite the same years in combat, one of the supporting female protagonists, Marygay, only gets made an executive officer while Joe, the male protagonist becomes a major.
                          I really stopped reading.
                          "From time to time I demonstrate the inconceivable, or mock the innocent, or give truth to liars, or shred the poses of virtue.(...) Now I am silent; this is my mood." From Sundrun's Garden, Jack Vance.
                          "As the Greeks have created the Olympus based upon their own image and resemblance, we have created Gotham City and Metropolis and all these galaxies so similar to the corporate world, manipulative, ruthless and well paid, that conceived them." Braulio Tavares.

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