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What book are you reading right now? (2010)

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  • Just finished "The Angel's Game" by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. A fast stimulating read, but not as good as "The Shadow of the Wind". Whilst that one was from the reader's point of views, this one is from the writer's. A great follow up though, and I am looking forward to "The Prince of Mist" in May.

    Now, I am on to "The Master and Margarita" by Mikhail Bulgakov. I have meaning to read this classic for an age. Now I can see why people rate it so highly. I have been fully engaged from the very start.
    ‘In real life people do not spend every minute shooting each other, hanging themselves or making declarations of love. They don’t spend every minute saying clever things. Rather they eat, drink, flirt, talk nonsense."

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    • I too loved both Zafon books,great reads!
      "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

      Hunter S Thompson

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      • ballard's cocaine heights. love the way he writes about spanish seaside towns populated by ex-pat brits with the same withering distain that he uses elsewhere for other models of dystopia.

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        • Just read that Mr. Feist and Sierra, the game company that owns the rights to the games the books are based on, are in a dispute and that the last two novels of the series may never be written. Oh great, another series where we're left hanging.

          BTW, starting Drake's Northworld: Justice.
          herb

          Man spends his time on devising a more idiot proof computer. The universe spends its time devising bigger idiots. So far the universe is winning.

          http://www.wolfshead.net/wolfshowl


          http://www.wolfshead.net/books

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          • halfway through White Chappell, Scarlet Tracings by Iain Sinclair
            Kevin McCabe
            The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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            • Originally posted by porcus_volans View Post
              ballard's cocaine heights. love the way he writes about spanish seaside towns populated by ex-pat brits with the same withering distain that he uses elsewhere for other models of dystopia.
              Thats a great book PV!
              The bit with the tennis coach is hilarious.
              I just opened The Condition of Muzak by Oor Fearless Leader.
              "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

              Hunter S Thompson

              Comment


              • That's a nice thumbnail summary of JGB's style, PV! I'll pick up a copy of that book soon. Tonight, I started reading Balzac's Pere Goriot.

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                • Read A Study in Scarlet at half-time during Sinclair's White Chappel, Scarlet Tracings.
                  Kevin McCabe
                  The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Kevin McCabe View Post
                    Read A Study in Scarlet at half-time during Sinclair's White Chappel, Scarlet Tracings.
                    Shurely that should be the other way round?
                    Papa was a Rolling Stone......

                    Comment


                    • Kevin, when you finish it you'll have to read 'A Scarletin Study' by PJ Farmer!

                      Halfway through Chatterton, and it's very good, some well drawn, funny characters, and a story that keeps you guessing. Really well done.
                      Last edited by Governor of Rowe Island; 03-09-2010, 12:11 PM.
                      You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

                      -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

                      Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

                      :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


                      "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Guzzlecrank View Post
                        That's a nice thumbnail summary of JGB's style, PV! I'll pick up a copy of that book soon. Tonight, I started reading Balzac's Pere Goriot.
                        If you have a ballardian thing about shopping centres check out kingdom come. brilliant.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Pebble View Post
                          Originally posted by Kevin McCabe View Post
                          Read A Study in Scarlet at half-time during Sinclair's White Chappel, Scarlet Tracings.
                          Shurely that should be the other way round?
                          Surely, I missed an l in White Chappell. I read Holmes as a kid and loved him. But, it's been a while, so I read his debut again. You know, I think Mike has a Holmes story out in a collection in the bookstores. Over in mysteries.

                          Originally posted by Governor of Rowe Island View Post
                          Kevin, when you finish it you'll have to read 'A Scarletin Study' by PJ Farmer!

                          Halfway through Chatterton, and it's very good, some well drawn, funny characters, and a story that keeps you guessing. Really well done.
                          Will do Gov! Your tips always pay off. What's Chatterton about?
                          Kevin McCabe
                          The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

                          Comment


                          • Chatterton is about a modern day poet, Charles Wychwood, who seems to find evidence that Thomas Chatterton faked his death in 1770. There is a hell of a lot more to it than that, of course. He writes about Wychwood's friends and people connected to Chatterton and the creation of the painting of him on his deathbed. Ackroyd is renowned for playing about with time, with connections and echoes across the years, and he does that in this book and to a greater extent in Hawksmoor. He sets a lot of his books in London and has been placed with the other 'London' writers by some. I don't think he's as dense as I understand Sinclair to be. I think you'd like it, Kevin, but don't go looking for it if you already have enough to read.
                            Last edited by Governor of Rowe Island; 03-10-2010, 11:16 AM.
                            You see, it's... it's no good, Montag. We've all got to be alike. The only way to be happy is for everyone to be made equal.

                            -:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-

                            Image Hive :-: Wikiverse :-: Media Hive

                            :-: Onsite Offerings :-:


                            "I am an observer of life, a non-participant who takes no sides. I am in the regimented society, but not of it." Moondog, 1964

                            Comment


                            • I read Chatterton last year and enjoyed it. I lived in Bristol as well so it was of double interest. Also The House of Dr Dee, which I had thought was in Mortlake in the book, but it was central London around Spitalfields or to the north west of it, but below Islington. Not sure if he researches a book and then uses it to write a fiction novel.

                              I found Sinclair very dense and took a while to get use to the prose style. Learn a lot as well especially about our south west part of London.

                              Not sure that a study in scarlet was in two parts of the original annual/book, so between the first part and the second part, there other stories as it threw me as young reader and I didn't know what was going on. Gave up once as I was lost (and not in Utah).

                              Finished Silas Marner and found it v. enjoyable. I have a copy of Felix Holt waiting for me at some point. Crashed through The Magician's Guild by Trudi Canavan - not bad, but a bit cliched in places. A wander to Botswana and the the Good Husband of Zebra Drive (a bit of mind candy) by Macall Smith - who I discovered before mega litertaure stardom beckoned.

                              Then to Dreaming of Jupiter by Ted Hughes and dreaming of my mid life crisis, waiting for a motorbike and the new MotoGP season to begin. Go! Go! 46!!!!!!!!!!!!
                              Papa was a Rolling Stone......

                              Comment


                              • Condition of Muzak was brilliant yet again so its only fair i move on to The Lives and Times of Jerry Cornelius!
                                "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                                Hunter S Thompson

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