Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

The Laughter of Carthage

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Laughter of Carthage

    Mike:

    I recently finished reading Carthage and just wanted to drop a line and let you know how downright brilliant it is. When talking about the "New Wave" stuff you once said something along the lines of - "It wasn't that we couldn't tell a story, it was that we were trying to tell as many stories as possible at the same time." I felt something like that going on in Carthage. You were so pitch perfect in your use of the "unreliable narrator" device, it got the point where absolutely everything that Pyat tells us, even the most seemingly benign things, can be interpreted in multiple ways. It literally felt as if I were reading at least three or four stories at the same time! Absolute fucking genius, Mike.

    I was just wondering if you could translate the last two lines for me?

    Ven vet men umkern mayn kindhayt? Wie lange wir es dauern?

    Thanks much. And Happy New Year!

    Nick Parisi.

  • #2
    Re: The Laughter of Carthage

    I was just wondering if you could translate the last two lines for me?

    Ven vet men umkern mayn kindhayt? Wie lange wir es dauern?
    .....

    Nick Parisi.[/quote]

    While you're waiting for Mike's response let me give it a try. It looks halfway like Yiddish and the rest is German with a minute error:
    "When shall they 'turn around' (?) or 'return' my childhood? How lang will it take/last?"
    I do suspect old Pyat wasn't too firm in either language, and surely never wrote in them
    Pleasure to serve you,
    L'Etranger
    Google ergo sum

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow. With readers like you I am decidedly blessed.
      Yes, it's a mixture of Yiddish and German and you've got it dead
      on, stranger...
      The idea is basically that I've improved Pyat's English (as editor) and
      done what I could with some of the other languages and otherwise left in examples of his half-crazed mixture of languages he's picked up on his travels. He denies any Jewish background but, of course, does break into Yiddish occasionally, and understands it.
      To a degree I also used this technique for the chorus voices in Mother
      London, trying to capture some of the cosmopolitan quality of a big
      city, but also used patois in that.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment


      • #4
        I wonder if a reader will make up a digital companion some time, that has all the translations in order that goes along with each book's page number.

        Would that take away from idea in the first place and it's purpose, though?

        It might be interesting, I don't know.

        "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
        - Michael Moorcock

        Comment

        Working...
        X