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What's it all about, Jerry?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    So how do we take power back from the corporate elite and spread it more fairly, actually improving our quality of life as well as our economy ?
    The million dollar question, of course.

    Part of me thinks that we should convince China to call in its markers on US debt. That would change things in a hurry. Too drastic a measure, though.

    I think we have to start by working to get some of the idiots out of office. People like DeLay have showed that the government is for sale to the highest corporate bidder. Removing people like that is one place to start--especially at the local level, where the voice and will of the people , as well as direct action, are more likely to resonate with less influence of corporate lobbies. Eventually, this could work uphill (and on the Hill), and we could actually have campaign reform. I realize this is a bit naive.

    I also think we should work to destroy the Republican coalition. No, not the Republican party. I mean coalition. As long as people vote against their own economic interests in the name of values, economic disparity will continue to increase. I've said many times that I am totally befuddled by those who would rather lose their health care than stop fighting to end abortion. This is really about controlling discourse, at which the Democrats have been lousy.

    Wake up the press.

    These are all structural things, in which we can play a small part. As individuals we can make a difference by protesting with your money. Don't be a sheep. Choose where and what you buy wisely, with full informed consideration of what your actions are doing. Vote in all local elections. Do something. Even post crackpot ideas on message boards. :)

    I really do believe that we're reaching a tipping point. GM and Ford are shining examples of what has happened to the old world order. They are on the verge of collapse simply because they promised to meet people's basic needs--income and health care. They are scaling back on both. If this is indicative of where we are heading--with pensions and health care as luxuries--people may pay attention to all of the bait-and-switch.

    Really, the simple answer is people need to wake up. I'm not a Marxist, but I certainly believe in false consciousness.

    Ahem... So much for a quick response. Weren't we talking about Jerry? :D

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Zero
      Become as hard as a Puritan when it comes to saying that separation of church and state, shared affluence and an inclusive middle class, and the free press came from PROTESTANT CHRISTIAN theology and DUTCH and BRITISH culture. Don't budge an inch on this one.
      I agree with you in substance, Zero, but "hard as a puritan"? I think our model in this instance was the person who managed to actually pull off the revolution that the "Independents" (Cromwell's party) could only glimpse from behind the ramparts of a dictatorship: that person was of course John Locke, who far from being a hard-nosed puritan was a person who bent over backeards to get along with everybody, and in fact was very well liked by everybody (er, excluding of coure those who wanted to arrest him for treason!) :)

      "Puritan" is a not a flattering term, moreover. I think rather the party you seek to identify with are the 17th-century republicans--who are best identified through the "Independent" character of their theology--middle class English Calvinism with Arminian qualifications; that is, free-thinking Presbyterians who had friends in Holland. Lord Shaftsbury, Locke, the American Scocians like Jonathan Mayhew (and Emerson, mmm?), Democrats like Jefferson, Hathorne, Melville--trumps, jokers, capital story tellers, amiable lads always.

      Good question, Doc! Mmm. Maybe those confused pangs of self-righteous indignation Jerry felt were the rumblings of a waking political consicousness that arrives at some improved resolution in the study of 17th and 18th century Anglo-Amrican liberal politics? And is it any wonder Rose falls in love with Dick Turpin, 17th century highwayman? Um, over to Christopher Hill's studies of 17th century culture for more there....

      In addition to Second Ether stories, maybe we should work on JC stories for PX? What are the possibilities? What's your speculation? Mmm. He'd be sitting in some kind of contril center facing a wall of screens, monitoring the situation, quietly sending coded mythages (myth + message) to agents in the field? Trolling for transmogs and coordinating their movements to maximize the organisation's effectiveness?

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
        So how do we take power back from the corporate elite and spread it more fairly, actually improving our quality of life as well as our economy ?
        I'll be thinking on that question for the next 50 years or so.

        If money would lose it's value and become worthless, that would take power away from the corporations for the short term and everyone would have to go back to the barter system. Then maybe we could all start over and make mom and pop shops again since the people would actually have to deal and trade with others eye to eye again instead of handing down orders from the boardroom.

        I don't know how to stop the corporations from forming again in the long term, besides passing laws against them like the old anit-monopoly laws. :D

        "With a deep, not-unhappy sigh, Elric prepared to do battle with an army." (Red Pearls)
        - Michael Moorcock

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Carter Kaplan

          In addition to Second Ether stories, maybe we should work on JC stories for PX? What are the possibilities? What's your speculation? Mmm. He'd be sitting in some kind of contril center facing a wall of screens, monitoring the situation, quietly sending coded mythages (myth + message) to agents in the field? Trolling for transmogs and coordinating their movements to maximize the organisation's effectiveness?
          Jerry would be sending those mythages to PX agents in the field, I presume? And the wall of screens are in the Shed? :lol:

          Comment


          • #35
            Jerry would be best used in such a project I think, since that's his essence. Harrison reckoned he was as much a technique as a character.

            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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            • #36
              Cure deeply impressed me, as well there is much throughout the JC material that inspired my Invisible Tower work. There is something about the JC technique, however, that I have difficulty with, and I can only ascribe it to a difference in temperament. If this makes any sense: I think you need dark hair to weave that Cornelius grammar successfully. It's a very brunette--smart, fast, brittle, self-composed, controlled (artistically controlled, I mean)--sort of humor. In struggling with it, I found I was too fey to pull it off, and I had to invent a new, essentially different grammar--dry, facetious, deranged, whacked-out--to create a comparable effect. The Cornelius grammar breaks down into lines. The Invisible Tower grammar breaks down into aphorisms. Being American also makes it difficult.

              Have you discussed this or similar distinctions with John Sladek (or other Americans)?

              Have any abnormal psychologists, er, I mean psychologists with expertise in abnormal psychology-- :scratch: --looked into the Cornelius material?

              I want to mix Jerry with the second ether. I've got a crew of chaos engineers at the center of the Universe sinking into a miasmic supercarbon tar pit, and it looks like the only way to recover the Lost Multiverse is to heat up the forge, re-shoe the soft drive on the Pegasus engine and then run the Cornelius Loop, which is a mighty finicky loop indeed. Set the chronometers back to absolute zero! Allah help us if it fails!

              And then the smiledons show up.

              To be continued....

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Carter Kaplan
                To be continued....
                And then? And then? Eh-eh...

                Comment


                • #38
                  Um, Carter, I have fair hair ? Pure Aryan, you know. Or at least that's what my dad told the Racial Purity Board... I inherited his big round AS head and blue eyes and what you might call my mother's Jewish temperament (she was also a lot better looking than me).
                  I was influenced in part at least by the Black Mask writers -- wanted a laconic, no-nonsense approach which took all the questions asked by the modernists for granted (as answered). In that sense, of course, Jerry and Co are nothing but post-modernists -- they finish one another's sentences sometimes, stuff like that -- they KNOW the conventional (modernist) analyses and they're bored by them. They like to cut to the chase, as it were.

                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                  The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                  Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                  The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                  Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Warwick Colvin, Jr’s

                    Corsairs of the Second Ether

                    Chapter CMXVLXIII: The Antinomian Gambit


                    The story thus far: Upon crashing upon the slowly swelling surface of the miasmic supercarbon tar pit at the center of the strange, laws-of-physics-defying "Universe", Cappy Cahtah Kohenum of the Bifurcating Monofilament orders the immediate re-shoeing of the Pegasus engine, necessitating the throw-back of all ship’s thermochronometers to absolute zero, and so simultaneously and paradoxically initiating and terminating the dialogic flow within the core of the Pegasus engine itself, bringing not a few chaos engineers to doubt if the re-shoeing will be completed in time to run the Cornelius Loop. Meanwhile, as the temperature converges upon the beginning of time, the super carbon tar thickens, and catches fast the paws of the advancing smiledons.

                    Now read on!

                    Cappy Cahtah Kohenum nodded with satisfaction at the tri-color synoptic space viewer. "That will hold those kitty's for a while. Right! How much time until re-shoeing is complete?"

                    Billy Blake, ship's blacksmith, is unsure. "It's the forge, Cappy! What hand dare seize the fire?"

                    "Belay that, Billy. The New Jerusalem wasn’t built in a day. Believe in yourself. One foot in front of the other, lad, like the Little Choo Choo: 'I think I can . . . I think I can . . . I think I can . . ."

                    Professor Pop had seen Cappy drive the men too hard before. "Cappy, Billy is doing the best he can. The duration of the current synopsis is approaching absolute zero--

                    "--there will be time enough withal, to be a rock and not to roll!" Cappy couldn’t help completing Pop's sentence. He had heard it all before.

                    Winking at the old gray beard, Cappy turned to his other responsibilities. Once more Lt. Baudrillard was doubting the authenticity of the images coming through the tri-color synoptic space viewer. Baudrillard chose his next words carefully: "As we approach absolute zero, modernity retreats further and further into the future. Therefore, all that is about to happen is an imitation of what we anticipate. Under such circumstances, how long do you think we can maintain the illusion of signification? Our expectations were all fulfilled long ago. We've consumed it all before, you know?"

                    Cappy momentarily lost his patience--but in the nick of time (not a commodity they had a lot of, incidentally) he realized he was reacting when he should have been responding. Maybe Pop was right? And for a few moments he thought to do a mitzvah . . . but he just couldn't bring himself to go through with it. Mitzvah-shitzvah, he thought, he'd hoist Baudrillard by his own petard! "Do you want to discuss postmodernism, again? We've consumed that before." Cappy shook his head. Why he of all the skippers of the Chaos Brotherhood should be stuck with these screwballs.... Ah, what the heck, they were lovable screwballs!

                    Professor Pop puffed his pipe with a piquant sparkle in his eyes. He knew the skipper well, so well that he could read his thoughts. If time wasn't converging upon absolute zero, he could have anticipated Cappy's next move.

                    Cappy stood shaking his head as he anticipated Pop's next speculation; but, after all, he hadn't the time to contemplate such notions. He had a ship to run. "Billy!" he ordered, "grab the chain and the hammer. It's cool enough by now. I'm going out to bring back the brains of one of those tigers!"

                    The tension deflated for a few moments. Baudrillard looked back and forth between the image of Cappy in the tri-color synoptic space viewer and the “real� Cappy in the compartment beside him, and decided that he was having trouble drawing a distinction. The metal digits in the thermoclock turned over more slowly. Clank . . . clank . . . clank . . . clank . . . Cappy was climbing into his silver insulated time suit. From the throat of the forge the fire roared.

                    Professor Pop crammed his thumb into the bowl of his pipe and extinguished the smoldering white sage that had done so much to purify the transforming atmosphere, which had by this time taken on a definate universal tang. He wondered for a few moments how their bodies might react to the rarification of this new space? He decided they better not take any chances. "You don't intend to go out like that do you, Cappy?"

                    "What do you mean?" asked the determined leader of the Lost Corsairs.

                    Pop shook his head. "You look a might fey, golden boy. Don't you think you ought to die your hair?"

                    Cappy could only laugh. "Blonds have more fun. Besides, my aura is combed. I'll represent the Bifurcating Monofilament with honor, dear fellow!

                    Billy Blake looked up from his forge and snapped his iron pincers. "Begging your pardon, Cappy, but you would't be going out like that if we were back in the Multiverse!"

                    Cappy narrowed his eyes at Billy Blake--and then blinked at the pincers. "That's 'Captain Kohenum' to you, dude!"

                    "Well, quite actually," said Professor Pop," your mother was a shiksa, and according to the rules you're no more kosher than that aura you've been bragging about!"

                    Cappy wasn't about to split hairs with the good professor--besides, he left his Torah in his other time suit. "If I've told you once, Professor, I've told you before," said Cappy, and he recited a tid-bit of ancient advice he once received from his sage father: “’The Rabbis don't make up the rules, we do!’"

                    Pop shook his head. "What, are you--an antinomian Cohenum, Kohenum? One of those Paul-reading "Jews for Jesus?"

                    "No, Pop, I'm with that other outfit--Jesus for Jews!" And jabbing once upward toward Allah with his index finger for emphasis, Cappy entered the airlock, which slammed behind him with a deep shuddering clang and a defiant hiss, as if the entire structure of the Bifurcating Monofilament , roots and branches, was resonating in agreement with the iron resolution of the mixed-blood antinomian peregrine of time.

                    But once he was out standing alone on the frozen tar, Cappy wondered if perhaps he should have dyed his hair. Those smiledons weren't frozen after all--they were moving!

                    "Dog-gone-it!" exclaimed Crappy, "I don't care if I have to tear it out through one of their blasted mouths. I'm not going back inside without a brain!"

                    To be continued....

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Aw-rite
                      ya got one
                      now let it run a bit
                      play with it some
                      so's it'll wear itself down
                      'fore ya try 'n reel it in
                      "A man is no man who cannot have a fried mackerel when he has set his mind on it; and more especially when he has money in his pocket to pay for it." - E.A. Poe's NICHOLAS DUNKS; OR, FRIED MACKEREL FOR DINNER

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Wolfrik View Post
                        Each year I pluck one of the Cornelius novels from my bookshelf and re-read it. The experience is always a satisfying mixture of novelty and familiarity, but I'm always left feeling that I've been excluded from an elaborate in-joke.
                        Too long in coming, but I'd like to add that although there may not be any "in-jokes", it does require some knowledge of a number of events and people to get it all. Like for instance I've been a reader of the Cornelius stories for many years, but I only recently became aware that Prince/Prinz Lobkowitz was a real person (he was one of the supporters of Beethoven's work), and the short story "The Longford Cup" was immeasurably helped by (again only recently) becoming aware of the events of the real Lord Longsford. I would also suggest looking for the book "Death Is No Obstacle" which illuminates other aspects of the stories and themes in the Cornelius mythos. Greg

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          i tend to agree with wolfrik on the"elaborate injoke front"but for me that has always been part of the fun.I just finished the entropy tango which was skullbakin but george orwell as major nye now your not telling me thats not an "elaborate injoke"
                          "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                          Hunter S Thompson

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                          • #43
                            The Ever Mutable nature of Reality...

                            I read the cornelius quartet backwards and it seemed to make perfect sense, obviously as much sense as any tale of a time traveling mesianic creature can, might try reading them again cos condition of muzak was the most confusing in my mind but maybe thats because I read it when i was little..

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              a good idea

                              thats a good idea actually paul,i think ill try that with the cornelius quartet.Tthe only time i ever did that was inadvertently with the end of time trilogy because i was young and daft and didnt know any better but i still loved them.Its yet another great facet of mikes work that means you can do that. all the best.
                              "I hate to advocate drugs,alcohol,violence or insanity to anyone,but they've always worked for me"

                              Hunter S Thompson

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I have to say that I'm not really trying to make elaborate injokes, but write for an audience which appreciates (as clearly the people here do, so I don't think I'm getting it wrong) a reference I don't have to spell out OR simply enjoys the story for its own sake.
                                I actually disapprove of 'mandarin' fiction and thought A Cure for Cancer got a bit too close to it, so pulled back in the subsequent stories. Blair's ambiguity around 'Empire' reflected Major Nye's. The association provides what is essentially an extra narrative in the book. All the 'experiments' are nothing more or less than experiments in offering the reader as many narratives as possible. It DOES take a fairly sophisticated reader to enjoy every aspect, every narrative offered, but then I know I have sophisticated readers. QED.

                                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                                The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                                Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                                Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                                The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                                Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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