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Calling Jerry Cornelius tech support!

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  • Calling Jerry Cornelius tech support!

    Ok, I just finished the Cornelius Chronicles Vol I (The final Programme, A Cure For Cancer, The English Assassin & The Condition of Muzak), and all I can say is "whew"! Now on to vol II.

    I found Vol I a challenging read. As Mr. M has pointed out, a lot was left to the reader to 'fill in'. I think we were even meant to fill in several of J C's deaths, the secondary character's purposes, relationships, significances, etc, the world situation... All somewhat spelled out, but much left to the reader. Obviously, in these stories, more than possibly any other books I've read, each reader's interpretation will vary extremely widly. I wonder what others may have got out of the stories.

    Any other Cornelius readers out there? Thoughts?
    Don\'t blame me; I voted for Trixitroxi Ro!

  • #2
    Re: Calling Jerry Cornelius tech support!

    Originally posted by duggm
    I wonder what others may have got out of the stories.
    I got very confused 8O

    Kind of hard to follow: characters get killed early on and come back later???(resurrections or 'alternate' versions?)

    Guess I'll just have to keep rereading them
    Madness is always the best armor against Reality

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    • #3
      I did find them somewhat frustrating though also compelling. Frequently I wished for a bit more of the narrative style of The Final Programme in the later ones, but then some of MM's most recent Cornelius stories such as "Firing the Cathedral" actually seem to have a bit more of that. All of the deaths and reappearances of the core characters certainly have a strange effect on the reader.
      My Facebook; My Band; My Radio Show; My Flickr Page; Science Fiction Message Board

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dead-Air
        All of the deaths and reappearances of the core characters certainly have a strange effect on the reader.
        Just as long as, say, Current Jerry doesn't meet up with Dead-from-the past Jerry, and then Future Jerry shows up.

        Unless all three have their 12-string Rickenbackers in hand
        Madness is always the best armor against Reality

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        • #5
          "Confused" - "frustrating" - "compelling", I'm right there with ya! Glad it wasn't just me! :oops:

          Did Jerry ever die? Or did he just get a bunch of do-overs?
          Don\'t blame me; I voted for Trixitroxi Ro!

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          • #6
            Well, I liked having him as a corpse for an entire book. I was actually mildly dissapointed when he started walking and talking again after that.
            My Facebook; My Band; My Radio Show; My Flickr Page; Science Fiction Message Board

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            • #7
              I liked the Jerry Cornelius stories that i have read so far..(not all of them were written by MM)

              For sure it was confusing at times ....
              But I really liked the way Jerry was literaly everything he was said to be. I thought that it was kinda cool and ironic that J C learns that he screwed up all along and that they shoulda left Time as it were......

              I guess it gives us the "what if" scenerio's that make us all the more glad for the life we live.. well thats what I got from Jerry :roll:

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              • #8
                Originally posted by duggm
                ...

                Did Jerry ever die? Or did he just get a bunch of do-overs?
                He's one manifestation of 'The Eternal Champion', so he's a hard guy to put down, he's been re-incarnated more times than Angel. Unfortunately, he also seems to encompass some of the worst attributes of the 20th Century's pop culture 'Gods & Heroes'. He's got feet of clay, a neck of brass and he sulks a lot.



                I owe JC a debt of gratitude. When I was having my umpteenth nervous breakdown in London a few years back, it was using the likes of Jerry C., Philip K. Dick and (don't laugh) Lovejoy (the books, by Jonathan Gash, not the TV series), as templates that allowed me to put my life back together as something I could live with.

                "What would JC, PKD, or L have done?" got me through the worst.
                :lol:

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                • #9
                  I feel that the 'cut up' narrative of the Cornelius sagas may actually be a more naturalistic representation of existence than 'conventional' narrative. By that, I mean that the true human experience of existence is non-linear, and our experience of time is flexible, in a more dramatic and perceivable sense than the purely (Einsteinian) relativistic. Our consciousness does not necessarily follow a trammeled pathway. Differing periods in our lives - I always call them 'eras' - may proceed at differing rates and differing degrees of 'intensity' or 'reality', if you like. The 'eras' that we exist in throughout our lives are therefore partly disarticulated, and, as we are ourselves altered by our experiences, our 'characters' become subtly different according to the era in which we happen to exist at any one time.
                  What I'm getting at is that normal narrative texts impose a largely artificial ordering of event-perception and clarity of sequence that does not actually exist in 'reality'. The 'confusion' of the JC series, with apparent deaths, resurrections and repeating events may have a greater veracity to the human experience of the universe than normal storytelling. Whilst we do not (as far as we know...) 'die' literally and become resurrected in a different time and place, I think elements of our personalities can be destroyed, eroded, created from scratch and remodelled in such a way that makes the JC narratives quite metaphorical. In this respect, MM's 'Cornelian' style may be regarded as a paradigm shift, both in literature and in self-realisation.
                  Yeah, er...well, that's how it struck me! :D :oops: 8O

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                  • #10
                    What Perdix said. :)

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                    • #11
                      So if JC is an aspect of the EC, whom is he serving? Law? Chaos? The Balance? Rock and Roll?
                      Don\'t blame me; I voted for Trixitroxi Ro!

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                      • #12
                        Himself?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by duggm
                          So if JC is an aspect of the EC, whom is he serving? Law? Chaos? The Balance? Rock and Roll?
                          Himself? The human race? All of the above?

                          Edit: Damn! Too quick off the mark there, Perdix :D

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                          • #14
                            Clearly, our synapses short-circuited across the voids of the multiverse, CandyflossCow...like a big old spark-plug. Or something. :D

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                            • #15
                              Clearly his sister, and thereby himself. But that's as Jerry. What about as the EC? The EC always serves one of the above, no? I think he was serving Chaos by trying to implement his own sence of order (Law?).

                              :?:
                              Don\'t blame me; I voted for Trixitroxi Ro!

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