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Elric & Albinism.

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  • dasNdanger
    replied
    *takes deep breath and blows dust away* KOFF-KOFF!!!

    Just thought I'd dust this old thing off.

    A very interesting site of a girl with OCA1 albinism - she explains several things, including what it's like to see through her eyes. Thought some might enjoy.


    http://www.knowlton-family.co.uk/Albinism/bianca.htm

    And, of course, this site, which has been linked in other threads: http://www.albinism.org/


    das
    Last edited by dasNdanger; 05-30-2009, 09:19 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jules
    replied
    Having spent some time in Germany, I can see how easy it is to develop a dislike of Turkish guest workers - my wife was living over there for a year, and the only people to give her hassle (comments, etc) on the street were the Turks.
    But I think it's more down to the guest worker thing than anything else - you only need to think what British builders are like abroad - gangs of lads with nothing better to do, and no real relationship to the place they're working in (they are literally second class citizens).

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    In Bushovik culture, which celebrates philistinism and anti-intellectualism, it's not likely to die out in a hurry. Some cultures which seemed singularly free of such traits suddenly reveal them when the cultural balance is somehow threatened (real or imaginary). I remember being impressed at how most young Swedes I met weren't racist in the late
    50s/early 60s. Now, I hear, there is a 'backlash' against Turkish workers who weren't, of course, there when I was there. For all that, liberal humanist governments can limit and discourage racism. When things get bad are when our democratic governments play the race card, or something similar. There are a lot of Moslems out there at the moment far more fearful of the consequences of 9/11 than non-Moslems fearful of further terrorism. While racial profiling continues to be attacked by the administration and elsewhere, we are at least doing much to counter such
    singling out of people, though it must be said people of dark skins are
    still treated as potential criminals in many societies still dominated by people of Northern European origin. It also has to be said that some of the worst racism I've ever heard has been from the mouths of Arabs,
    especially Saudis. I was shocked, when younger, at the extraordinary racism of Russians I met, who sounded like Europeans from the 19th century. I remember one KGB lady (very pleasant to me) explaining how Pushkin had been unstable because he had negro blood. I'm not sure what it's going to take to get rid of the vast amounts of prejudice and myth which infects the human race in this area. We continue to see it exemplified in Europe (Serbs and Croats, for instance) and it continues to be the poison which infects the Middle East. No matter how many idealists (and we sometimes forget just how many idealists there were in Israel, for instance, when the state was founded) try to destroy that
    poison, it still keeps welling up. Perhaps we should worry more about that threat to the world more than we should worry about greenhouse
    gasses. If Bush can't agree to Kyoto, maybe he can agree that the UN
    needs to fight a War on Racism if we are to win any of our other 'wars',
    actual or abstract.

    Leave a comment:


  • manmiles
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    I think it makes good drama to have a hero with a handicap or being prone to some illness or attack (even if it's Green Kryptonite).
    It makes common sense in literature to have your charecters imperfect in some way, whether through physical disadvantage or a mental illness or even a personality flaw. It reads much more interesting than the perfect 'ubermensch' who readers will tire of quickly and will not be able to relate to them.

    Of course, the downside is that if you make them TOO fallible, the charecter can become dislikable and the reader will lose patience.

    The portrayal of albino's as mostly antagonistic charecters is yet another example of society's constant willingness to 'alienate the other', i.e- Blacks, Jews, Communists, Homosexuals, Terrorists, aliens (okay, aliens may or may not be fictional, but still the same intent)

    The fact that it still happens in the oh-so-enlightened 21st Century is the saddest fact of all.

    Leave a comment:


  • AC
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    http://www.lunaeterna.net/popcult/
    That's a fascinating site. I hadn't realized the extent to which both literature and film have villainized albinos.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    Hmm. Reincarnation ?

    Leave a comment:


  • PsychicWarVeteran
    replied
    Rare ALBINO SHARK found in Australia!

    http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2-2004142168,00.html

    "HE may look like he’s got jaundice, but this yellow fellow is a one-in-a-million albino shark.

    Two-year-old Mango was picked up by the crew of a prawn trawler in a river mouth north of Sydney, Australia.

    Experts say it’s a miracle he wasn’t eaten by predators after a rare genetic mutation made him stand out from the usual dull grey of a Port Jackson shark.

    He goes on show from today at Sydney Aquarium — where he’s now in protective custard-y."

    Here's a link directly to the picture:

    http://images.thesun.co.uk/picture/0,,2004141159,00.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • Theocrat
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    http://www.lunaeterna.net/popcult/

    I'm indebted to my friend Ian for this. I checked out the site and have also written to them. They use a very nice Robert Gould picture, too!
    They aren't aware of Zenith the Albino, it seems, who can also be checked out at the Sexton Blake site and also at the Savoy site, where other links to Zenith can be found. In no way is Zenith lethargic, except when smoking opium. He's astonishingly strong and fit, in fact.
    Yeah.. The girl who's made the site seems nice and smart. Good thing to mention Zenith to her aswell! :) I forgot about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Starscream
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    I think it makes good drama to have a hero with a handicap or being prone to some illness or attack.
    I agree. The AD&D character I have referred to was so challenging to RP I cant say he always had the better of his 'liabilities' and it always made for some serious and intense RP if I say so myself. (I ran that AD&D character from 1984 to 1996 and finally retired him. Though its not a permanent retirement. I just got tired of converting him to all the rule changes that are always coming out...and he did get pretty high level). Ever since I drew up that character every other one Ive done has never been 'perfect', totally-powerful-in-every-way ‘hack and slash' specialist. That has just never appealed to me. It didnt before that character and I go out of my way to never get one like that since. I think if more writers took that outlook they might come up with better and more griping stories and characters. No one is perfect in real life. Having a little 'real' in a fantasy world is such a nice touch. I hope what Im saying makes sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I, too, think those books are above average, though I was a bit harder than I should have been on him in Wizardry and Wild Romance, tending to lump him in with Tolkien imitators about whom I had become a bit grumpy at the time.

    Leave a comment:


  • VonWeiner
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael Moorcock
    I think it makes good drama to have a hero with a handicap or being prone to some illness or attack.

    Kind of like Stephan R. Donaldson's Thomas Covenant and his leperosy. ever read those anyone? I liked the first three. The second trilogy seemed a little too much (IMO).

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    I think it makes good drama to have a hero with a handicap or being prone to some illness or attack (even if it's Green Kryptonite). That said, Zenith's main problem with his albinism is that he feels that he is an outcast, too different to his fellows.
    For some years now, of course, I've also dealt with the genetic strain in the Melnibonean royal family, the people usually known as 'silverskins',
    who are considered not necessarily genetically abnormal, as 'different'
    and dangerous. Some more of this comes up in the graphic novel sequence I'm doing for DC with Walter Simonson. Silverskins are, it's pointed out by some supporters, often 'lucky'. Others think doom comes to Melnibone with such rulers.
    That site points out that traditionally albinoes have been identified in negative ways. I suspect that Zenith and Elric have largely shown albinoes as positive, in that they are indeed 'outlaw' characters but are
    nonetheless very accomplished and smart.

    Leave a comment:


  • Starscream
    replied
    As long as my AD&D character took the necessary precautions he was pretty fierce as someone to go against. I went to that site on albinism and glanced around and I cant see where an albino could be /that/ fit and robust all the time without at least some precautions (in regards to the other fantasy character you just spoke of). I dunno, it just takes some sort of ‘believability’ out of it if you have a character with a known liability be unhindered by it at all.

    When I first did my character up my DM advised against it cause it would leave him prone for various situations if I screwed it up. I welcomed the challenge and couldnt have been happier. It made the game and this characters development better IMO. And I didnt take them away after I realized the inadvertent similarities to the Elric series. As I said before, having the main character not nigh invulnerable is one of the most appealing things about him as a fantasy character IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Moorcock
    replied
    http://www.lunaeterna.net/popcult/

    I'm indebted to my friend Ian for this. I checked out the site and have also written to them. They use a very nice Robert Gould picture, too!
    They aren't aware of Zenith the Albino, it seems, who can also be checked out at the Sexton Blake site and also at the Savoy site, where other links to Zenith can be found. In no way is Zenith lethargic, except when smoking opium. He's astonishingly strong and fit, in fact.

    Leave a comment:


  • Starscream
    replied
    Well, I had a post all written out for this thread and then it got wiped…bah….so lets try this again . . .

    When I first got into Role Playing, AD&D *2nd edition* I decided to make my elvin character stand out and I made him an Albino. I find that to be very unique visually and I wanted my character to stand out in some way that was ‘legitimate’. His hair was pure white as was his skin. I made his eyes a very light, almost translucent amethyst though. Making him like this I also did a little reading on the condition and had it where he could not tolerate the sun to much extent. His eyesight was actually pretty good though but that was because he didn’t get over exposed to it when he was a child. (His childhood was far from how it should have been . . . but I suppose some good actually came out of that mess . . . being locked away had its advantages as in his eyes didn’t get burnt out so to speak). And he also had a blood condition. Odd set of similarities considering, looking back in retrospect, what I had created was spooky in many ways to a certain albino we all know. At the time, I had never heard of any of Mr Moorcocks books or the Elric series in the slightest but my DM was very familiar with the series and brought over his copies for me to read. Needless to say all I could say was WOW. To begin with what a story . . . and then what similarities I had stumbled across (and I thought I was being original).

    Anyway, reading on albinism in some various encyclopedias and stuff when I was drawing up this character, what I read said there was ‘full albinos’ and then something regarded (at that time) as ‘half albinos’. They generally had more normal pigmentation but usually had some distinguishing mark in their hair (yea that sounds odd but that’s what I read I swear). I had a class mate that could have been one of those. She was pale in complexion, light eyes but brown hair with the front naturally very light blondish/white. She never dyed it. This was years ago and Im sure theres been much more knowledge gathered on it since then. I remember reading something about the ‘half albinos’ carried the gene and that if one parent had the gene, 1 in 4 births (on average but not always the case) would be albino and I think 1 would be half and then like 2 would carry the gene. Im really not good with anything like that and its been years since I read any of this stuff. Shoot what I read was probably so wrong anyway :P I probably only read enough and remember enough to convince most I don’t know a thing about it….errr…..

    I have heard that albinos do not always have red eyes but that is a common color for their eyes to be. Ive also heard that not all true albinos have white or light blonde hair either . . . I always thought it was very cool that the ‘hero’ of this saga had something like that. Even though Im not one, I never thought anyone could or would take offense to Elric being an Albino. If anything, if I was one, Id think it would be cool that such a dynamic character in the fiction world could be ‘flawed’ like that. Then again, I don’t consider stuff like that to be a ‘flaw' persay. Its part of what makes that person who thay are. I found it refreshing to have a ‘hero’ character that had problems like Elric had. It seemed more ‘real’ to suspend belief on and accept when you were reading it. Having a main character not perfect was just . . . well . . . perfect . . .

    Leave a comment:

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