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Who first published 'The Jade Mans' Eyes'?

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  • Who first published 'The Jade Mans' Eyes'?

    There I was, sorting through my collection (selling off the duplicates to be honest!), when I recalled an early pamphlet sized novella I once owned. Entitled 'The Jade Mans' Eyes', it featured Elric and, I think, Moonglum. The cover was mainly white, as I recall, with a line drawing under the title. Sadly some perfidious type pilfered it from my shelves long ago. I find myself wondering who the publisher was. It isn't listed in the bibliography index - I've just checked. Was it an early Savoy publication? I have Sojan and The Golden Barge already, but haven't found any reference to the little book I bought back in the mid-seventies therein. Oh! Do help, someone!
    He's well smoked

  • #2
    Hi Kipper. Jade Man's Eyes was first published by Unicorn Books, run by Mike's old friend Bill Butler. The cover was by James Cawthorn. It's a shame someone made off with your copy as it's quite a desirable item (I bought mine years ago). Still you may be able to find another copy on ebay or somewhere else.

    You can find scans of the cover here in the Image Hive.

    Unicorn also published The Distant Suns by Mike and James Cawthorn (credited as Philip James), which was a larger-format comic-sized book. Again this can be found in the Image Hive. Take a look, there's a lot of interesting stuff in there.
    Last edited by Marca; 11-20-2006, 03:01 PM.
    'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

    Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

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    • #3
      The Jade Man's Eyes also later appeared in Flashing Swords #2, edited by Lin Carter.



      It is also included as (iirc) the third story in the Elric novel, The Sailor on the Seas of Fate.
      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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      • #4
        That's the very fellow! Many thanks for guiding me to a fondly remembered blast from the past. I wonder where my old copy is now? Sigh...
        Flashing Swords Vol 2? I sold that on eBay earlier in the year without even looking inside the thing! I read it when I bought it, way back in time. I mentioned elsewhere about my rapidly fading memory, just as well I've a copy of Sailor!
        I really have to go now - lots of re-reading to do.
        How embarrassed am I?
        Last edited by Kipper; 11-21-2006, 06:53 AM.
        He's well smoked

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        • #5
          Our failing memories are supposed to embarrass us?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Doc
            Our failing memories are supposed to embarrass us?
            Mine does! I'm only 48. Some stuff sticks in my head, useless trivia mainly. It makes me quite useful in quiz teams!
            He's well smoked

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kipper
              That's the very fellow! Many thanks for guiding me to a fondly remembered blast from the past. I wonder where my old copy is now? Sigh...
              Flashing Swords Vol 2? I sold that on eBay earlier in the year without even looking inside the thing! I read it when I bought it, way back in time. I mentioned elsewhere about my rapidly fading memory, just as well I've a copy of Sailor!
              I really have to go now - lots of re-reading to do.
              How embarrassed am I?
              It was re-written quite a bit for Sailor, of course.

              And in Elric: Making of a Sorcerer (IIRC) we learn that R'Lin Kren A'a (or whatever the city's name was) wasn't in fact the city of the ancestors of the Melniboneans after all.

              I think of all the Elric stories it must be the one clinging by the thinnest thread to canonical status!

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              • #8
                Not only my memory, but my vocabulary needs a kickstart as well! "Canonical Status"? What do you mean?
                Apologies for being semi-literate!
                He's well smoked

                Comment


                • #9
                  This should explain the basic concept of 'canonicality' with regards to literature:

                  Canonical

                  From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                  Canonical is an adjective derived from canon. Canon essentially means "rule", "law", "standard", and has come to mean "generally accepted" or "authoritatively correct."

                  basic, canonic, canonical: reduced to the simplest and most significant form possible without loss of generality, e.g. "a basic story line"; "a canonical syllable pattern"
                  Literature and art

                  It is used most often when describing bodies of literature or art: those books that all educated people have read make up the "canon" (see also canon (fiction)).
                  Canon (fiction)

                  From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


                  In the context of fiction, the canon of a fictional universe comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. that are considered to be genuine, and those events, characters, settings, etc. that are considered to have inarguable existence within the fictional universe. In order for the fictional universe to appear cohesive, especially in fictions that contain multiple parts, both creators and audiences sometimes find it useful to define what has and has not "actually happened" in that universe. Usually items that are considered canon come from the original source of the fictional universe while non-canon material comes from adaptations, spin-offs or unofficial items, often in different media.

                  The practice of defining a canon in fiction derived from the concept of a literary canon, a specified collection of works considered to be both representative and the best of a particular form, genre or culture. It appears to have originated amongst fans of the character Sherlock Holmes, as a way to distinguish between the original works of Arthur Conan Doyle and both adaptions of those works and original works by other writers utilising Holmes and related characters and settings. However, the most interest in and controversy over issues of canonicity have appeared in the fan followings of two science fiction franchises, Star Wars and Star Trek.
                  _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                  _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                  _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                  _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So what Guy's saying, is that it barely fits into the accepted framework of the Melnibonean world?

                    I found a spare copy of Flashing Swords 2, whoohoo!
                    PS, thanks for that David! Now that my brain's expanded, I'm off to bed (it's 02.00am here). Or should that be off to 'The Deaming City'?
                    Last edited by Kipper; 11-23-2006, 04:59 PM.
                    He's well smoked

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GuyLawley
                      I think of all the Elric stories it must be the one clinging by the thinnest thread to canonical status!
                      Just re-read both versions, the Flashing Swords one, which I guess is close to the original version, and the Sailor version. I preferred the first version, the continuity in the re-write goes a bit astray. I can see why MM re-wrote it to fit in with the early part of the storyline. I preferred the Moonglum version myself, it fitted better into Elric's later adventures because of the sword references.
                      Just my opinion!
                      He's well smoked

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