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Elric Books Reprinting in US

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  • #46
    Will this release be limited to the US? I know we could always order them online, but I'd love to see Elric appear on Dutch bookshelves at last. His name ought to be known in this particular Young Kingdom too.

    I'd prefer the stories in order of publication myself. When I read them I followed the chronological order of the omnibuses, and I don't think that was best for my enjoyment. Better to read along as the writer develops his style, characters, overarching plot and so on. But if there's going to be extensive notes on the process of writing, chronological order would be inconvenient anyway.

    Comment


    • #47
      English language editions generally can't be sold in large numbers outside the area of the contract (in this case USA and territories, possibly with Canada) but it's up to local bookstores to order them if they think they have enough customers. Oddly, not that many of my books have appeared in Dutch editions (Gloriana was one) because it's thought most interested Dutch readers read English anyway. This is also the case in most Scandinavian countries, with the exception of Finland. It's possible that future editions in some countries where my sales follow the general pattern of US and UK, that the new editions will be produced eventually, but meanwhile I think only the US editions will include extra material and so on. This actually follows a pattern where I first published the stories in chronological order in US editions (the DAW editions) in the 70s! This is because the books went out of print in the States sooner than in the UK (in that case because th US publisher went bankrupt).

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

      Comment


      • #48
        Ah well, I could hope. As you say, few of your books have appeared here. Fourteen actually, and that includes the Cornelius quartet and the Dancers trilogy.
        I agree that most Dutch readers who'd be interested would just as soon read them in English, but then English versions aren't/haven't been readily available either. You're a very obscure writer around here, and I can't really blame people for not ordering books solely on my recommendation.

        Guess the whole problem will solve itself when (if) the Elric movie appears. That should get at least the Swords & Sorcery stuff translated and in stores. At which point I'll get to act all snobby about having been a fan since long before the movie.

        Comment


        • #50
          I would love to see a real nice edition done in buckskin, after all these "works" are part of our Tradition, a legacy. I am way to engrossed in my own vision to digest every letter of every book but I have read a fair few. Maybe somebody like Brock could cut a deal to get a "nice edition". Short of the original paperbacks a high quality library in bound leather with lovely tooling, is likely to be seen by many of a certain age, a "great investment". I believe that you are as important in your own way as William himself.

          Comment


          • #51
            buckskin???

            I was thinking of something more along the lines of "madben/"young kindgoms" upstart skin". Afterall, it is all the rage these days in some parts of the multiverse...

            Just sayin...

            *ducks*
            "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life." -Robert A. Heinlein

            "If I accept you as you are, I will make you worse; however, if I treat you as though you are what you are capable of becoming, I will help you become that." -Johann Wolfgang Goethe

            "Man once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous, and like a ship without rudder, is the sport of every wind." -Thomas Jefferson

            Comment


            • #52
              Originally posted by David Mosley View Post
              The fact that the stories/novels were originally published out of order presumably never troubled the original readers.

              I know I'm coming in very late on this debate and that the Del Rey reissues have been underway for a while, but back in the mid eighties young fans were going nuts because they couldn't get Elric of Melnibone. Granada/Grafton were publishing all the other Elric books, so if one wanted to read them in order of internal chronology, you had to start with Sailor on the Seas of Fate.

              At that time Grafton were publishing popular omnibus editions of Hawkmoon, Corum and dancers, which used to sell really well. As local Moorcock Guru on the Bath bookselling scene, I was always being asked about reading orders etc and the absence of omnibuses (or even an in print edition of Elric of Melnibone) was a real headache for new readers.

              Then Arrow reissued Melnibone and kept it in print for about a year and my life was a lot easier. Soon afterward Grafton finally got rights to it and for another year everything was plain sailing.

              As a bookseller, for me the problems started once the Orion/Millennium omnibuses started to go OP. Obviously Mike will have had his issues and triumphs with various publishers which I don't know about, but I can confirm that I always found the Grafton omnibuses easy to sell - they were a great way of hooking in new readers - and that the situation re. Elric was a tough one to get around.

              ...which is a very long way around of saying I'd prefer the books to be arranged in order of internal chronology, for objective practical reasons. As an individual, veteran Moorcock reader, I'm all for editions in writing order with the extra material.
              Last edited by Stephen_E_Andrews; 01-26-2009, 01:59 AM.
              2006: 100 Must Read Science Fiction Novels (5th printing 2009/Bulgarian Edition (!) due 2011).

              2008: 100 Must Read Books For Men (2nd printing 2008)

              2009: 100 Must Read Fantasy Novels

              sigpic

              Comment


              • #53
                Originally posted by The Bishop Swine View Post
                I would love to see a real nice edition done in buckskin, after all these "works" are part of our Tradition, a legacy. I am way to engrossed in my own vision to digest every letter of every book but I have read a fair few. Maybe somebody like Brock could cut a deal to get a "nice edition". Short of the original paperbacks a high quality library in bound leather with lovely tooling, is likely to be seen by many of a certain age, a "great investment". I believe that you are as important in your own way as William himself.
                I love full leather bindings, but they are really expensive to produce and therefore at retail would be pretty pricey, which is why you don't see them very much. Easton Press ( a subscription based bookclub in the USA) has done some nice classic SF and Fantasy in full leather and on abebooks you can usually pick them up for between £20-£50, excepting signed copies).

                Mike once signed a couple of skivertex-bound slipcased copies of Elric of Melnibone and The Vanishing Tower for me (skivertex is a kind of synthetic, smelly faux-leather). Nice books, nonetheless. Does Mike's work deserve fine binding? Of course! But it's tough to get publishers to even shell out for cloth these days. Instead we get grubby boards and bad paper.
                2006: 100 Must Read Science Fiction Novels (5th printing 2009/Bulgarian Edition (!) due 2011).

                2008: 100 Must Read Books For Men (2nd printing 2008)

                2009: 100 Must Read Fantasy Novels

                sigpic

                Comment


                • #54
                  Originally posted by The Bishop Swine View Post
                  I would love to see a real nice edition done in buckskin, after all these "works" are part of our Tradition, a legacy. I am way to engrossed in my own vision to digest every letter of every book but I have read a fair few. Maybe somebody like Brock could cut a deal to get a "nice edition". Short of the original paperbacks a high quality library in bound leather with lovely tooling, is likely to be seen by many of a certain age, a "great investment". I believe that you are as important in your own way as William himself.


                  I love full leather bindings, but they are really expensive to produce and therefore at retail would be pretty pricey, which is why you don't see them very much. Easton Press ( a subscription based bookclub in the USA) has done some nice classic SF and Fantasy in full leather and on abebooks you can usually pick them up for between £20-£50, excepting signed copies).

                  Mike once signed a couple of skivertex-bound slipcased copies of Elric of Melnibone and The Vanishing Tower for me (skivertex is a kind of synthetic, smelly faux-leather). Nice books, nonetheless. Does Mike's work deserve fine binding? Of course! But it's tough to get publishers to even shell out for cloth these days. Instead we get grubby boards and bad paper.
                  2006: 100 Must Read Science Fiction Novels (5th printing 2009/Bulgarian Edition (!) due 2011).

                  2008: 100 Must Read Books For Men (2nd printing 2008)

                  2009: 100 Must Read Fantasy Novels

                  sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #55
                    Originally posted by The Bishop Swine View Post
                    I would love to see a real nice edition done in buckskin, after all these "works" are part of our Tradition, a legacy. I am way to engrossed in my own vision to digest every letter of every book but I have read a fair few. Maybe somebody like Brock could cut a deal to get a "nice edition". Short of the original paperbacks a high quality library in bound leather with lovely tooling, is likely to be seen by many of a certain age, a "great investment". I believe that you are as important in your own way as William himself.


                    I love full leather bindings, but they are really expensive to produce and therefore at retail would be pretty pricey, which is why you don't see them very much. Easton Press ( a subscription based bookclub in the USA) has done some nice classic SF and Fantasy in full leather and on abebooks you can usually pick them up for between £20-£50, excepting signed copies).

                    Mike once signed a couple of skivertex-bound slipcased copies of Elric of Melnibone and The Vanishing Tower for me (skivertex is a kind of synthetic, smelly faux-leather). Nice books, nonetheless. Does Mike's work deserve fine binding? Of course! But it's tough to get publishers to even shell out for cloth these days. Instead we get grubby boards and bad paper.
                    2006: 100 Must Read Science Fiction Novels (5th printing 2009/Bulgarian Edition (!) due 2011).

                    2008: 100 Must Read Books For Men (2nd printing 2008)

                    2009: 100 Must Read Fantasy Novels

                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #56
                      Originally posted by Stephen_E_Andrews View Post
                      ...back in the mid eighties young fans were going nuts because they couldn't get Elric of Melnibone. Granada/Grafton were publishing all the other Elric books, so if one wanted to read them in order of internal chronology, you had to start with Sailor on the Seas of Fate.

                      <snip>

                      Then Arrow reissued Melnibone and kept it in print for about a year and my life was a lot easier. Soon afterward Grafton finally got rights to it and for another year everything was plain sailing.
                      I remember that period well. The Great Melniboné Famine of '82.

                      My mates and I used to badger the shop assistants at Hammicks in Harrow on a monthly basis to see whether Elric was coming back into print. Great was our rejoicing when one day when she announced "Computer says 'Yes'".

                      We used to see these lists in the front of the Grafton/Granada paperbacks with titles like The Deep Fix, The LSD Dossier and The Swords of Heaven, The Flowers of Hell and wonder what secrets those 'lost' stories held, little thinking that we would ever get to hold them let alone read them.
                      Last edited by David Mosley; 01-26-2009, 04:41 AM.
                      _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
                      _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
                      _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
                      _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

                      Comment


                      • #57
                        Selling MMs books was always a joy for me when most of his backlist was in print in the UK, despite the Elric of Melnibone issue. I think I'd like to see omnibus editions of what I always think of as 'the big four (Elric, Corum, Hawkmoon, Erekose) back in print in Britain as this was a good way to pakcage and market them - although length is no indicator of quality as regards most Genre Fantasy, the fact is that for most readers under 35, 'Fantasy' means Very Big Books. So to be competitive and satisfy expectation while converting readers to high quality Fantasy writing, I think omnibus editions are the most attractive to novices, who think they're buying one big novel. It worked for Tolkien in the USA, as the individual volumes didn't do so well originally - it was the omnibuses that really took off mid-sixties over there.
                        2006: 100 Must Read Science Fiction Novels (5th printing 2009/Bulgarian Edition (!) due 2011).

                        2008: 100 Must Read Books For Men (2nd printing 2008)

                        2009: 100 Must Read Fantasy Novels

                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • #58
                          I didn't know the Elric books sandf others were OP in the UK. If so, I could do something about it. Orion/VG have had a stranglehold on publication for many years now and it's been very hard to deal with them -- in fact they won't deal with me most of the time. When he came to Orion Malcolm Edwards promised to sort things out. Instead he merely continued with what is essentially a very crooked policy of exploiting a loophole in a contract made between my old agent and Anthony Cheetham of Orion. The contract was iffy and I'd asked for an amendment letter clarifying certain issues., This was promised. I signed the contract, and then the amendment never materialised. Later agents have been defeated by the contractual complications. It means that for the first time (i.e. the last ten years or so) I have had no control over my own work. I find this Orion's behaviour contemptible, since they won't keep books in print and won't release them (the contract allows them to cross account on books that haven't sold as well as others). Edwards promised many things when he first took over and has proved himself weak and devious. But there it is.

                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                          Comment


                          • #59
                            Looking on Amazon.co.uk - and based on my own behind-the-counter experience - I can confirm that with a few exceptions, the Orion Eternal Champion sequence has been out of print for many years, with the possible exceptions of Von Bek and Elric, which I believe have been reprinted a few times due to sales demand. It's been many years since all of the series was in print, and few of them have been repackaged as Fantasy Masterworks (apart from Hawkmoon, Dancers and a selection of Elric stories). I'm sure you know all this, but the biggest problem for UK booksellers with your work for many years now has been patchy availability. I have to say that back when Grafton owned the rights to the core Eternal Champion series (Hawkmoon, Elric, Corum, Erekose, Bastable, Dancers), the books were easy for UK readers to find and easy for booksellers to stock and sell, as they stayed in print.

                            Speaking as a bookseller, I've never been happy with the Orion editions in terms of availability (except at the very beginning back in 1993) and Orion/Gollancz' failure to present the books in a uniform manner by keeping them in print is an enormous commercial failure on their part. Normally, I'm full of praise for Gollancz, as they are now the only major UK house showing full support for backlist titles in SF and Fantasy (HarperCollins have concentrated almost entirely and increasingly on new Fantasy, publishing little new SF after Jane Johnson had been on the case for a few years and dropping backlist titles, and Orbit are almost as bad in this respect).

                            As they have the original hardcover rights to so much superb international SF and Fantasy, Gollancz now have a near-monopoly on backlist paperback reissues. Younger readers now look at the Fantasy and SF Masterworks series as the gold standard. I have always been baffled as to why they don't release more of your titles from the original 14 volume sequence in Masterworks livery. Apart from the exceptions mentioned above (and Behold The Man), I can't understand why any commercially-minded publisher would let Corum, The New Nature of the Catastrophe, Bastable and singletons like The Black Corridor languish out of print. Your books have a consistent, proven sales record for decades and Gollancz have dropped the ball. It makes me angry when I can't turn to young and new readers of Fantasy when I'm behind the counter, easily pick a pile of your books off the shelves and say 'Read these!'.

                            I really hope you can reacquire the rights for the UK one day and place them with a publisher who recognises what a valuable property your core works are- it would be great to see your ouevre filling shelves again in the way Terry Pratchett's does, instead of being represented by a handful of titles. Not only that, we booksellers would have some proper Sword and Sorcery to point devotees too.
                            2006: 100 Must Read Science Fiction Novels (5th printing 2009/Bulgarian Edition (!) due 2011).

                            2008: 100 Must Read Books For Men (2nd printing 2008)

                            2009: 100 Must Read Fantasy Novels

                            sigpic

                            Comment


                            • #60
                              Thanks, Steve. Your letter is about the best breakdown of the situation I've had. I needed something like this to begin an attempt to get the rights of the books back.
                              Who knows, maybe we WILL see those Roberts covers on some hardbacks again! Sales of new editions of books have been very good in the US at what's considered a bad situation, same in France, so I'm pretty sure the same could be true of the UK. Mostly, the problem has been M. Edwards's refusal to answer any of my correspondence. I really have nothing but contempt for him.

                              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                              The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                              Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                              The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                              Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                              Comment

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