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Stormbringer - a card game

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  • Stormbringer - a card game

    I was surprised
    Last edited by Krzysiek; 05-16-2008, 03:14 PM.

  • #2
    Very interesting, K.

    So... I guess you have to just whip up the decks on your own? Gee, that's quick and easy. :roll:

    Note that Chaos has more cards than Law and that the author seems to equate 'Law' with 'Good' and 'Chaos' with 'Evil'. :? Further, Elric was a servant of Chaos, but this game has seven different iterations of the albino, all in the Law deck, including even Elric, Woman-Slayer.
    "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
    --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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    • #3
      They certainly shouldn't be doing this without some sort of permission and should have had the courtesy to run it by me. This is all part of the degredation of the original idea which goes on throughout what we can now reasonably call 'the fantasy industry'. It's very depressing.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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      • #4
        It must be very difficult, MM, to see your work so badly bastardized. It doesn't even seem as if the creator of this abysmal card game even understood the Elric stories, or indeed even read them. It's as if they just gleaned names and threw them together haphazardly.

        They can't even give proper credit to you for the inspiration, though they claim it's a "fan site."
        "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
        --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

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        • #5
          Intresting...

          Except....can you actually play the game? 8O though those are good points. I really don't like just waking up.

          Anyways...

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          • #6
            The corruption of the ideas of Law and Chaos, which I spent quite a long time making fairly sophisticated, is perhaps the worst thing that's happened throughout the fantasy industry. Add orcs and such to the mix and you get a thorough bastardisation of two sets of attitudes which, while often opposed, weren't exactly simplistic. I can hardly stand to witness all this and it's one of the main reasons I'm stopping writing more heroic fantasy stories. You feel overwhelmed -- drowning in garbage which people tell you you helped create! When you've spent your whole career trying to raise standards, it's pretty depressing to see them come to this.

            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
            The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
            Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


            Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
            The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
            Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

            Comment


            • #7
              Alas, peerless pursuer of spires, one can hardly disagree with your feelings about that. I speak as one who had a semi-pro review of early Warhammer comics rejected as being too unremittingly negative. Well, guilty as charged, but what else could one be?

              On the plus side, your own work will be enduringly recognised as the class act that it is.

              Not long ago I re-read the Hawkmoon and Castle Brass series, my least favourites of the “pure fantasy� material, for the first time in about 25 years. I was very pleasantly surprised by how enjoyable they were, especially the Castle Brass books. Divertissements, perhaps, and quite possibly not read by their author since leaving his typewriter, but still, entertainment that doesn’t insult the intelligence is so hard to come by. (Er… which is pretty much your point, I suppose!)

              More recently I’ve gone back to the Dancers at the End of Time trilogy, likewise for the first time in a long time. Powered through books 2 & 3 over the Easter break, a rare opportunity for R&R. These of course are kettles of a different fish, and just breathtakingly good, it seems to me.

              Quite apart from the writers you helped up (or along) as editor in the past, there must be a good few younger writers of quality now who either wouldn’t be writing at all, or would be writing less ambitiously, if they hadn’t had your example. I have three in mind in particular, from my very limited knowledge of the field.

              I’m sure you know I am not a Happy Clapper of any persuasion, but I hope you can keep that Black Dog, depression, at bay. Set the White Wolf on him!

              PS: What was that about all art approaching the condition of muzak?

              Comment


              • #8
                Mike,

                Tell everyone what happened with Dreamtheif's Daughter & Ravenbrand.

                Originally posted by Steeplechaser
                The corruption of the ideas of Law and Chaos, which I spent quite a long time making fairly sophisticated, is perhaps the worst thing that's happened throughout the fantasy industry. Add orcs and such to the mix and you get a thorough bastardisation of two sets of attitudes which, while often opposed, weren't exactly simplistic. I can hardly stand to witness all this and it's one of the main reasons I'm stopping writing more heroic fantasy stories. You feel overwhelmed -- drowning in garbage which people tell you you helped create! When you've spent your whole career trying to raise standards, it's pretty depressing to see them come to this.
                The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MM writing as Steeplechaser
                  The corruption of the ideas of Law and Chaos, which I spent quite a long time making fairly sophisticated, is perhaps the worst thing that's happened throughout the fantasy industry. Add orcs and such to the mix and you get a thorough bastardisation of two sets of attitudes which, while often opposed, weren't exactly simplistic.
                  Mike, your post reminded me of a question I've been meaning to ask you regarding Dungeons and Dragons. Do you feel Gygax stole and bastardized the whole Law & Choas thing with his development of character 'alignment'?

                  I've always assumed that because the Melnibonأ©an mythos was removed from Dieties and Demigods you must have not appreciated what Gygax was doing. I'd love to know the real story.
                  "Wounds are all I'm made of. Did I hear you say that this is victory?"
                  --Michael Moorcock, Veteran of the Psychic Wars

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Some general thoughts on this stuff from a long-time gamer and fan of Mike's work

                    The free card game is clearly a fanboy make-it-yourself page. This is an area of copyright infringement that gaming fanboys can run into, often with the best of intentions. Note that I'm not defending the posting of this without permission, just pointing out that many fans of an artists work will make their own homebrew games in tribute without thinking that they may be compromising the artist's ideas.

                    One of the interesting things about the game hobby is that there has been a growing segment over the last 10 years based on the wonderful world of board and card game systems developed principally in Europe. These are highly involved, beautifully produced and well-thought-out game systems and as an aside, if the licensing of board games will be part of the upcoming Elric movie, an interesting approach would be something like the job that was done with the War of the Ring by an Italian games company.

                    This is not only a beautifully produced game, but one which is fairly true to the spirit of the books and is actually fun to play (more info here: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/game/9609). The real challenge in boardgame design is to make an entertaining game through the alliance of theme, mechanics and playability. I've always thought, for instance, that a great card game could be made reflecting the Eternal Champion theme, but the needs of playability and the dynamics of card-games (plus the need to appeal to a wider gaming market) would involve compromises on the thematic elements. Anyway, that's neither here nor there for the purposes of this discussion.

                    On the Gygax D&D thing, my adolescence saw the happy coincidence of my discovery of the Elric stories and D&D (about 1976). For several years I ran a D&D campaign with a small group of friends that was based in Melnibone and a jolly good time we had even if there were some occasionally unfortunate and unexpected outcomes for characters from the books (like the day Rackhir lost an arm - bit tricky using a bow after that...). The great thing about modelling on the Elric stories of course was that it was easy to bring the campaign to a suitably resounding end when we all tired of it ("what do you mean, 'everyone's dead?'. Don't I get to roll some dice first or something?").

                    A brief reading of the first four chapters of The Hobbit provides many of the core concepts that seem to motivate D&D. On reflection it looks like the rest was acquired by plundering over the years anything that resembled fantasy literature. One of the unfortunate things in my mind about the whole world of D&D (which was very influential in the minds of many adolescent readers of fantasy) was that it conflated a whole range of fantasy worlds into one great potpourri of contradictory and unrelated ideas.

                    D&D was a grab bag of stuff from all over and it didn't care much for consistency or whose ideas were borrowed. The end result was a mish mash that may account for much of the muddy thinking that people interested in the fantasy genre have about author's works ("you mean there aren't any orcs in Elric?").
                    \"Such confidence, gentlemen, is warming to the heart\".

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