Announcement

Collapse

Welcome to Moorcock's Miscellany

Dear reader,

Many people have given their valuable time to create a website for the pleasure of posing questions to Michael Moorcock, meeting people from around the world, and mining the site for information. Please follow one of the links above to learn more about the site.

Thank you,
Reinart der Fuchs
See more
See less

Carnell's Stormbringer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Carnell's Stormbringer

    E.J. ("Ted") Carnell's copy of Stormbringer fetching $550 US.

    Stormbringer
    The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

  • #2
    I think I remember seeing that for sale quite some time ago Berry, not sure if it's the same seller or not. Be interesting to know if the high asking price is because of Mike's signature, the Carnell connection, or both... and whether Mike remembers signing that particular copy. Did he sign it for Ted, or later? Presumably he would have inscribed it for Ted and it just says 'signed'.
    'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

    Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

    Comment


    • #3
      Well spotted, Berry.

      And yers, I reckon that's been up for sale for some time. I remember seeing the part about "first Elric Novel" and thinking, "Hmmmm, technically, if you regard Stealer Of Souls as being a collection of novellettes, you might just about get away with that (Stormbringer being a collection of novellettes that was at least planned as one long piece).

      Bit pricey for a copy with a worn soiled DJ...? (Even given its other attributes.)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by GuyLawley
        Bit pricey for a copy with a worn soiled DJ...? (Even given its other attributes.)
        Perhaps the vendor doesn't really want to sell it.

        It looks like Abebooks can be a good source for pictures of book covers...
        The cat spread its wings and flew high into the air, hovering to keep pace with them as they moved cautiously toward the city. Then, as they climbed over the rubble of what had once been a gateway and began to make their way through piles of weed-grown masonry, the cat flew to the squat building with the yellow dome upon its roof. It flew twice around the dome and then came back to settle on Jhary's shoulder. - The King of the Swords

        Comment


        • #5
          Ted was my agent as well as my editor. He sold the book to Jenkins. I signed a copy for him. I suspect almost all his clients did that at the time.
          Incidentally, I planned Stormbringer as a novel, much as I planned the Hawkmoon books -- essentially four novellas. I cut the book, as it happens, for Jenkins, who had a maximum wordage requirement so they could sell the book at a certain price agreeable to the private lending libraries who were at that time their biggest customers. They'd built a large part of their company on the works of P.G.Wodehouse (and, for that matter, Herbert Jenkins, the founder). I think the price being asked is a bit hopeful...

          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
          The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
          Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


          Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
          The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
          Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

          Comment


          • #6
            Ooops, novellas, not novelettes. The bookseller calls Stormbringer the first Elric novel, which is correct, though it was the second book. Stealer of Souls was defined by Spearman as a “collection of stories,� which was pretty accurate, though they hang together well as a book.

            Other booksellers have tried to sell Caribbean Crisis as your first published novel (!)

            So that’s why Stormbringer was cut… the lending libraries were often part of a grocer's or tobacconist's shop, weren't they? Even small towns & villages had a few shelves of books for lending. Like the VHS tapes and DVDs of today. Did authors get lending library royalties, or was that only for Local Authority libraries?

            Comment


            • #7
              Nobody got library royalties in those days! If it hadn't been for a bunch of dedicated people, including Angus Wilson, Maureen Duffy and Bridget Brophy, originally called WAG -- the Writers Action Group -- there would be no royalty paid on public library loans. I was a member of the group.
              As I recall, the legislation wasn't passed until the 80s. Jenkins were one of the last of the great private library suppliers. Almost every community had at least one private library, lending books often not available in public libraries -- mostly popular fiction -- when I was growing up, together with Boots' Libraries (usually a whole floor above the chemist shop) and W.H.Smiths' Libraries. Until around 1895, the
              private libraries were enormously powerful, able to make or break a book, and more or less dictated what could be published. That's how the three volume hardbound novel arose -- because the libraries liked to lend a volume at a time rather than the whole novel. Many of those novels were not especially long. Dickens defied the lending libraries by publishing in parts. Mudie's Library dominated the 19th century and you can trace much of the development of English fiction through its influence. The sudden rise of the 'six shilling novel' really marks the beginnings of modernism. These were published in defiance of the likes of Bentley (the publisher) who was in league with the library system to keep the price of books at half a guinea a volume! George Eliot bemoans the fact that she has to do 'the middle book' in Adam Bede and the notorious long-windedness of much popular Victorian fiction has at least something to do with the fact that you had to produce at least two volumes, preferably three or four. Now you know why almost all my early fantasy novels came in three or four volumes.... :D

              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
              The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
              Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


              Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
              The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
              Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

              Comment


              • #8
                My copy of Stormbringer has a 'Boots Booklovers Library' sticker on the front (the 'Boots' logo is the that of the department store of the same name). What the heck was that? There are no other signs of it having been lent out as a library book, no stamps, ticket pockets or anything and not a great deal of wear either, other than you'd expect for a 40 year old book. I've never tried to remove the sticker in case it rips the dustjacket.
                'You know, I can't keep up with you. If I hadn't met you in person, I quite honestly would NOT believe you really existed. I just COULDN'T. You do so MUCH... if half of what goes into your zines is to be believed, you've read more at the age of 17 than I have at the age of 32 - LOTS more'

                Archie Mercer to Mike (Burroughsania letters page, 1957)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Absolutely right. They put the sticker on the book and then wrapped the book in a clear plastic wrapper. That way you couldn't peel the stamp off. So in this case they've preserved the Boots (the Chemists) sticker but somewhere you've lost their original wrapper. I actually have some pre-plastic boots wrappers, made of something like 'rexene'. There are tips on how to remove those labels in several book collecting books, as I recall! But you'd probably still get the shield outline on the wrapper.

                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
                  The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
                  Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


                  Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
                  The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
                  Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X