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Barrington Bayley (1937-2008)

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  • #16
    I too, am very sad to hear of this. He must have been quite a guy for my favorite emperor to smile at his comment on the dock when he would have sent any other man screaming to hell.
    Kevin McCabe
    The future is there, looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become. William Gibson

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    • #17
      I did an obituary for The Guardian but they don't appear to have run it. If they haven't run it by next week I'll put it here. My memoir will be in the next LOCUS.

      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in Europe:
      The Whispering Swarm: Book One of the Sanctuary of the White Friars - The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction
      Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles - Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - Modem Times 2.0 - The Sunday Books - The Sundered Worlds


      Pre-order or Buy my latest titles in the USA:
      The Laughter of Carthage - Byzantium Endures - London Peculiar and Other Nonfiction - The Sunday Books - Doctor Who: The Coming of the Terraphiles
      Kizuna: Fiction for Japan - The Sundered Worlds - The Winds of Limbo - Modem Times 2.0 - Elric: Swords and Roses

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      • #18
        RIP: Barrington J. Bayley

        RIP: Barrington J. Bayley (1937-2008)
        by Dan Clore
        (libertarian)
        Thursday, October 23, 2008


        Obscure British science fiction writer (his first publication in America was a story in the Judith Merrill anthology England Swings SF) Barrington J. Bayley has passed away.

        While Bayley's work never enjoyed wide popularity, his fellow writers have recognized its merit. Michael Moorcock, for example, considered him "the most original writer of his generation".

        William Burroughs borrowed the concept of deadliners from Bayley's novel The Star Virus.

        The editors of Semiotext(e) SF, perhaps the greatest original SF anthology ever published, chose Bayley's "Cling to the Curvature" as the closing story.

        Bayley's novel Annihilation Factor has special interest to libertarians, as the character Castor Krakhno is based on the historical Ukrainian anarchist Nestor Makhno.

        Among this obscure author's works, many single out his novel The Zen Gun as a masterpiece.

        There is a website in tribute to him: The Astounding Worlds of Barrington Bayley.
        Source
        Last edited by David Mosley; 09-10-2011, 03:26 PM.

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        • #19
          Mike, sorry to hear of the passing of your friend.
          My condolences to Barrington's family and friends.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Michael Moorcock View Post
            I did an obituary for The Guardian but they don't appear to have run it. If they haven't run it by next week I'll put it here. My memoir will be in the next LOCUS.
            Mike, not sure if you know but your obituary for Barry appeared in last Thursday's (13 Nov) edition and can be read on the Guardian website.
            _"For an eternity Allard was alone in an icy limbo where all the colours were bright and sharp and comfortless.
            _For another eternity Allard swam through seas without end, all green and cool and deep, where distorted creatures drifted, sometimes attacking him.
            _And then, at last, he had reached the real world – the world he had created, where he was God and could create or destroy whatever he wished.
            _He was supremely powerful. He told planets to destroy themselves, and they did. He created suns. Beautiful women flocked to be his. Of all men, he was the mightiest. Of all gods, he was the greatest."

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